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Old 03-23-2012, 08:20 AM   #31
NJjeff
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Why don't you split up the 2.

Hang the tank anywhere up above.
Than mount the motor/compressor on a bracket off the wall, down at a normal serviceable level.


Hanging that huge castiron lum + large motor & tank is asking for trouble. Plus it's a nightmare for even routine service.
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Old 03-23-2012, 03:32 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by NJjeff View Post
Why don't you split up the 2.
Not going to happen, the mount is a welded component of the tank, and locates the motor and pump.

Sans tank you have to create a mount.

The only other place I would consider placing the air compressor is near the main panel where I have some metal rolling stairs. To do so I think requires getting rid of rolling stair and building out over the compressor.

Unfortunately under the stairs by the panel is one of the few places NOT wired for service.
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Old 03-23-2012, 03:50 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by P B G View Post
Not going to happen, the mount is a welded component of the tank, and locates the motor and pump.

Sans tank you have to create a mount.

The only other place I would consider placing the air compressor is near the main panel where I have some metal rolling stairs. To do so I think requires getting rid of rolling stair and building out over the compressor.

placUnfortunately under the stairs by the panel is one of the few es NOT wired for service.
I would think that adding a few feet of conduit some wire and a breaker would be a lot less trouble than trying to get another comp in the air.
Not to mention having the comp. at ground level for routine maint.
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Old 03-24-2012, 08:09 AM   #34
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If you're is chicago, I'm assuming that roof would be rated for a sizable snow load unless that is the floor to another story above. I would't think the roof support would be an issue, but the weight bearing part of these is the top, not the bottom. I would tie the top and bottom together with some welded stock and not worry about is.
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Old 03-24-2012, 10:13 AM   #35
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I would tie the top and bottom together with some welded stock and not worry about is.
If you're talking about the trusses, then the proper place to put the load is at the panel point(s) of the truss. This is where the diagonal members intersect at the top and bottom chords.
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Old 03-25-2012, 07:57 PM   #36
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Forget the strut.

Angle, 3X3 or 4X4, 5/8" would be a lot better than strut. You need double-back strut at a minimum.

If you can get some C-channel and make some strong-back mounted to the trusses, then drop some 3/4" all thread through the strong-back and down to the angle-- you could hang quite a bit from that. I'd anchor to the wall as mentioned. If you could through bolt that angle to the wall in both directions, you'll really stop the swaying that will probably be at its worst when stopping/starting.
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:10 PM   #37
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Any bolts or threaded rod that passes thru the wall will need a 6"x6"x1/4" plate between the nut and the concrete block.
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:19 PM   #38
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That raises a question.

If you move away from strut, is there a way to fabricate a steel platform with vibration isolation/anti resonance?

Assuming "point load" is < safety margin of the truss, could a platform be constructed and suspended with a mechanism to reduce vibration and resonance?

Perhaps simply bolting the platform to the wall through a rubber isolation mount?
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:21 PM   #39
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Any bolts or threaded rod that passes thru the wall will need a 6"x6"x1/4" plate between the nut and the concrete block.
Is that to prevent collapsing the block or oblonging the hole?
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:27 PM   #40
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Is that to prevent collapsing the block or oblonging the hole?
That will prevent the nut from pulling thru the block.
If vibration is a concern the rod can be double nutted.
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Old 03-26-2012, 07:46 AM   #41
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Re-think

Even if that's been there for years, that's just a really bad design waiting to fail. If you really have to wonder, you should re-engineer it so you don't. Have you considered burying the compressors instead?

I've got my giant one bolted to the concrete on rubber dampers and I can still feel it upstairs in the house.

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Old 03-26-2012, 08:10 AM   #42
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Just buy a new house.
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Old 03-26-2012, 08:15 AM   #43
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I really hope that's not how your professors taught you to go about it...
We proof load test installations all the time IF we are unable to accurately assess the existing structure by way of load path and grade strength/section size.

You usually get plenty of warning by way of deflection in advance of failure. Using a test rig mounted just above floor level above adjustable timber packs means that any sudden slip results in load release from the rig. The key thing is to gradually increase the test load in increments.

Got to be careful it doesn't come down on your head of course. Anything you choose to do is entirely your own risk and responsibility and you are advised to seek the professional advice of a qualified structural engineer in respect of this matter.
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Bongolia screwed with this post 03-26-2012 at 08:27 AM
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Old 03-26-2012, 08:58 AM   #44
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We proof load test installations all the time IF we are unable to accurately assess the existing structure by way of load path and grade strength/section size.

-----

Got to be careful it doesn't come down on your head of course. Anything you choose to do is entirely your own risk and responsibility and you are advised to seek the professional advice of a qualified structural engineer in respect of this matter.
Here Yugo. That's ~100 tons:

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Old 03-26-2012, 09:59 AM   #45
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Somehow I doubt that the gigantic 100 ton steel pipe is hanging on a lash-up of all strut and threaded rods attached to a roof truss made out of 1/8 x 3" angle iron welded up by some guy who was itching to get out of the shop for a weekend of heavy drinking...
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