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Old 04-04-2013, 06:11 PM   #1
Long Gone OP
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Bluhduh Riding after prostate surgery

Got the news of the positive biopsies during Easter dinner with friends and family. Nice time to call Doc. I don't fault him really as he let me know as soon as he could and he's very good at what he does.

Now it looks like surgery is in my future so I'm wondering if anyone who's gone through that would share what their experience was afterward when riding. What helped or didn't and how long was it before you could do any real distance?

I've been planning on ordering Russell Day Long saddles. Maybe I can get the Doc to write a scrip for them? One can hope.

BTW, start getting your PSA and prostate examined in your 40s guys. It's not that big a deal and you could be very thankful later.
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Long Gone screwed with this post 04-04-2013 at 06:13 PM Reason: My wife is a grammar guru.
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Old 04-04-2013, 07:59 PM   #2
No False Enthusiasm
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Most of us who live long enough will develop prostate problems. A significant number will develop malignancies.

This version of the Airhawk may be of some help...

http://www.airhawk.net/airhawk-r.aspx

Quote:
The NEW AIRHAWK R is here! This strategically designed cushion has a cutout area that runs throughout the center of the cushion from front to back that allows for 3 points of no contact:tailbone, prostate and scrotum.

The tailbone relief area has tapered transition for increased comfort. The front cutaway allows for no contact on the scrotum as well we improved fit on the bike. Redesigned cell geometry improves airflow under the rider: NO HOT SEAT!

This cushion is designed not only for maximum comfort, but also addresses issues of prostatitis, general discomfort in the sacrum and coccyx, as well as under the prostate and scrotum.
Good luck with your treatment.

NFE
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Old 04-04-2013, 08:43 PM   #3
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No advice but a good luck wish. I am high risk (Dad and Grandfather both had it) so have been getting checked for 18 years now.

If you are a Vietnam Vet check with the VA, I've heard that Prostate Cancer is on the list of things caused by Agent Orange. You may be due a benefit.
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Old 04-05-2013, 01:59 AM   #4
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Here's info about Agent Orange & prostate cancer:
http://www.publichealth.va.gov/expos...ate_cancer.asp

Discuss the various ways of treating the aggressive prostate cancer with your chancre mechanic. This shows the various treatment options:
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/p...ge4#Keypoint19

Pick the options most likely to save your life, then the option that will affect your life after treatment the least, finally the option that relates to riding. For example, if the choice is between natural erections or getting back to riding a month sooner...hmmm, how long do I get to think about this?

The PSA testing isn't an easy decision. It detects early cancers, but it also has way too many false positives with the inconvenience, pain, expense, and possible infection from biopsies that show no cancer. The sudden rise in my PSA level showed my aggressive prostate cancer at age 56, though. The cancerous prostate gland was cut out at stage IIb--aggressive but not spread beyond the gland. 11 years later I get annual PSA tests and the level is still undetectable.
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Old 04-05-2013, 03:47 AM   #5
okennon
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Protect the area

Longone,
I went with Russell day long seat and had them eliminate much of the padding below that sensitive area. I can now ride for hours and no longer experience the discomfort while riding or the after affects due to slight bruising and/or swelling.
Personal note: take your time...be patient ...it'll happen.
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Old 04-05-2013, 05:24 AM   #6
Jacl-Kampuchea
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Would it be an invasive surgery or lazer reduction?

My dad had lazer on his a few years ago, it was benign thankfully.

He was cranky and sore for a month or so but after that he was back to full action with no lasting ill effects.

All the best with your recovery.
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Old 04-05-2013, 06:31 AM   #7
OhBoy
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Prostate

I had surgery Oct 2006.
Dont remember all the details.
Your doctor will probably tell to wait until you stop using the catheter.
Remember, do your Kegel exercises!
I experienced some leaking for a few months. The exercises are important.
Check with your doc, he may say it is OK to start doing them prior to surgery.
I know I was riding in April of 07.
Dont have any photos of riding that winter.
My blood work comes back with 0 PSA now.
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Old 04-05-2013, 07:57 AM   #8
t6pilot
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Long gone,
You have many options,
Six years ago I had partial cyro focal freezing, they only froze a portion of the prostate

Had a tube you know were for three days, day it came out I was fine
Prostate institute of America Dr Duke Bahn Ventura Ca
I have sent at least a dozen pilot friends to him ALL have been satisfied with the result

Don't let some one cut on you without second opinion
I had three, surgery, radiation, and cryo, chose the later and couldn't be happier

If you choose surgery
Please ask these questions
1 how many do you do a week, some do 5 or six some do one a month
2 robotic the only why to go if surgery

Feel free to pm me for more info
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Old 04-05-2013, 11:28 AM   #9
tmm2good
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I had mine removed Jan-11, was riding in the spring, a few months later. Do your PT- Kegals. That was a bugger to get under control, the leakage. But finally got it. My PSA comes back as a 0 now as well.
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Old 04-06-2013, 04:28 AM   #10
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Just remembered a small detail.

I was allowed two months rehab, no working post surgery. I used all of it. To answer your original question, "how long before you can ride again?" I may have taken a ride or two towards the end of the vacation.
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Old 04-06-2013, 11:58 AM   #11
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Quote:
robotic the only why to go if surgery
Why? Do the robotic surgeries actually show superior outcomes, or is the machine more for marketing than for results? As with every type of surgery, the skill and experience of the surgeon is critical. The last thing I read is that the robotic surgery does not have better outcomes on average. Things might have changed in the mean time, but check. Most of us don't buy motorcycles based on the amount of chrome on them, so don't base a surgery decision on the gizmos in the operating room. Only go for the gizmos if there is a real advantage.
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Old 04-07-2013, 09:54 AM   #12
Long Gone OP
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Many thanks for the responses.

thjis
Quote:
Originally Posted by okennon View Post
Longone,
I went with Russell day long seat and had them eliminate much of the padding below that sensitive area. I can now ride for hours and no longer experience the discomfort while riding or the after affects due to slight bruising and/or swelling.
Personal note: take your time...be patient ...it'll happen.
Thanks Okennon. I'll take that up with Russell and maybe I can send my seat off for them to work on while recuperating from having my other seat worked on. My understanding now is that after about a month I'll be able to "resume a normal routine including golf". Yikes! That's ALL I'll be up to doing? No offense to golfers but to me it's a waste of a perfectly good shooting range.

PT Rider said:
"Pick the options most likely to save your life, then the option that will affect your life after treatment the least, finally the option that relates to riding. For example, if the choice is between natural erections or getting back to riding a month sooner...hmmm, how long do I get to think about this?

The PSA testing isn't an easy decision. It detects early cancers, but it also has way too many false positives with the inconvenience, pain, expense, and possible infection from biopsies that show no cancer. The sudden rise in my PSA level showed my aggressive prostate cancer at age 56, though. The cancerous prostate gland was cut out at stage IIb--aggressive but not spread beyond the gland. 11 years later I get annual PSA tests and the level is still undetectable."

I'm at the same stage and aggressiveness, T2B, 4+3 Gleason, and hope to have the same results.

From what I've read in Dr. Patrick Wash's "Guide to Surviving Prostate Cancer" his nerve-sparing technique that was developed at Johns Hopkins to save the neurovascular bundles on either side of the prostate requires the surgeon to be able to feel for cancer outside of the prostate. That's something they can't do laparascopically with robotics. With a lesser grade I might consider that but the risk of cancer having escaped the gland isn't worth the risk IMO. Others MMV.

As t6 pilot said it pays to ask about the surgeon's experience. Walsh says to ask for rates of success in preserving potency and continence along with how many does he do in a year. Preferably the surgeon does this particular operation several days a week with totals in the hundreds or is one that's devoted his or her life to doing this one operation. Whatever the process it's the surgeon who makes the decisions and the difference.
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Old 04-07-2013, 12:50 PM   #13
Barnone
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I had 44 radiation treatments for my prostate cancer and rode a hour and a half each way from Robbinsville to Silva (NC) on my W650 to a lot of the sessions. I went to the gym in Franklin to work out just about every day on the way back to Robbinsville.

Never had to quit riding but took about a year to get my systems back to normal.

My PSA test the other day was .65
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Old 04-10-2013, 11:59 AM   #14
Garbln
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The real advantage of the robotic surgeries is it's less invasive and recovery time is greatly reduced. Recovery is also less painful. As has been said doing the exercises will help you regain your urinary control sooner. I had mine done about 4 yrs ago and am doing very well.

Good luck with whatever treatment you choose!
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Old 04-14-2013, 08:40 AM   #15
Long Gone OP
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Robitics it is

Thanks again for all the input. I'm going with the robotic surgery. Apparently the info. I have on the open surgery is from the doctor who developed the procedure and wants to promote it. Advances in robotics make it the choice in my case. There are fewer complications and recovery is quicker. Radiation was an option but not the best one IMO.

Riding will happen again in time. It's just life as life is the stuff that happens when one has made other plans.
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