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Old 04-03-2012, 04:45 PM   #16
deezildennis
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Location: in the powa band
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
As the former owner of a 1966 Bonneville, I totally agree about the "character" thing. The modern ones have almost no character at all. They are very much like a modern Japanese bike. I took one for a test ride, and decided right then not to buy it. It's not just the lack of sound, there is no vibration either, and the ride is just too smooth for me. To me riding a motorcycle should be a very visceral experience, and the new Bonnie has all the soul of a toaster. A 1983 or older Yamaha XS650 has lots more character than the new Bonnie. .
BAH!!! I Have and had plenty of old trumpets and bsa's.

But with my 08 t100. I like that mine doesn't leak, Blow the bottom of the cases out with the cam chain, leave me stranded, suck through a tank in 50 miles, have the headlight go out on the dark hwy but not have a burned filment..




deezildennis screwed with this post 06-24-2013 at 06:06 PM
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Old 04-03-2012, 05:17 PM   #17
marksbonneville
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deezildennis View Post
BAH!!! I Have and had plenty of old trumpets and bsa's.

But with my 08 t100. I like that mine doesn't leak, Blow the bottom of the cases out with the cam chain,
I can guarantee my old triumph twins will NEVER blow the cam chains out the bottom. Why? because they don't have cam chains and anyone who has owned plenty of them would know this.


I would consider a newer Bonneville or preferably a Thruxton.
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Old 04-03-2012, 06:44 PM   #18
gmiguy
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Character's overrated.

Of the bikes you mentioned, I'd keep the Bandit and just put a bit of time/money into making it exactly what I wanted.
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Old 04-03-2012, 07:09 PM   #19
NJ-Brett
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I have had many old Triumphs, and the new Bonneville, and a 1979 Bonneville and a 2005 at the same time, along with a 1969 Daytona.
The new ones are trouble free, but nothing like the older bikes, which were very light, had thick seats and handled better.
I never had electrical problems on my Triumphs, or any bike for that matter, as I pay attention to my bikes.

But most would not want to do a long trip on an old one. I did 9000 miles on my 1979 in a month, no problems other then a flat front tire at the Grand Canyon.
Lots of other 3000 to 4000 mile trips without issue as well.

The new ones, while not as good as the older ones in some respects, DO have electric start and are trouble free.
They need a seat upgrade for longer rides, and suspension work makes them better like most bikes...
They are over 100 pounds heavier then the old ones.

The old ones are now old, so its hard to compare against a new bike as far as reliability goes, but I had a new 79 in 1979 and ran it hard for many years and miles, in all weather, and it needed 3 speedo drives and 3 key switches.
The key switches just wore out, the speedo drive was just Italian crap. Very flimsy.
I traded the bike in on a new sportster in 1986. The Bonneville had 55,000 miles on it and was running fine. Great in fact.
The 2005 Bonneville lasted less then a year.
It was fine I suppose, it just needed a better seat to ride it cross country.
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Old 04-03-2012, 07:17 PM   #20
NJ-Brett
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If anything has cam chain issues it would be the new ones, the old ones were push rods.
Gear driven cams in the block, screw and lock nut valve adjustments, you could make most of your own gaskets, the crankshaft was very low in the frame, some models had it below the frame rails, for a VERY low center of gravity.
Makes for a short motor.
Very easy valve adjusting, no removing parts, big wide openings, 10 minute job.
Good design.



Quote:
Originally Posted by marksbonneville View Post
I can guarantee my old triumph twins will NEVER blow the cam chains out the bottom. Why? because they don't have cam chains and anyone who has owned plenty of them would know this.


I would consider a newer Bonneville or preferably a Thruxton.
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Old 04-04-2012, 06:43 AM   #21
deezildennis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marksbonneville View Post
I can guarantee my old triumph twins will NEVER blow the cam chains out the bottom. Why? because they don't have cam chains and anyone who has owned plenty of them would know this.


I would consider a newer Bonneville or preferably a Thruxton.
I had intended to say primary chain but anyway....

I still love my new Bonnie as much as my old cantankerous bikes.
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Old 04-04-2012, 08:51 AM   #22
SomethingClever
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Quote:
The modern ones have almost no character at all.
Yeah well that's just like, your opinion, man.
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Old 04-04-2012, 10:59 AM   #23
skysailor OP
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Must admit. Leaning towards the R12R. I just like them too much to pass it up. Got a great Bandit looking for a home.
Lyle
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:57 AM   #24
SomethingClever
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skysailor View Post
Must admit. Leaning towards the R12R. I just like them too much to pass it up. Got a great Bandit looking for a home.
Lyle
Good on ya. The R1200R is hot.
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:59 AM   #25
SomethingClever
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Though I have to admit, I came back to the thread to post another reply to this comment:

Quote:
The modern ones have almost no character at all.


Yup. Just look at that no-character POS. Makes me want to puke!
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Old 04-04-2012, 01:57 PM   #26
marksbonneville
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Originally Posted by SomethingClever View Post
Yup. Just look at that no-character POS. Makes me want to puke!
I agree, that dirty bike should be in my garage keeping my POS company.
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Old 04-04-2012, 03:06 PM   #27
Patch
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Thumb R1200r

I love my R

...not that there's anything wrong with that

I looked at the Bonneville also before I bought my Beemer. I really liked it - but didn't love it as compared to the R. Luckily for me, Mrs. Patch retained an affinity for the Triumph, and will likely be picking one up this season. She's just not comfortable on the R solo... feels it is too powerful too quickly or some such thing. She's not scared of it and can tip-toe it but to her it's just not quite right. Pillion only for her on the Beemer.

I think you can't go wrong either way... good luck with your choice!
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Old 04-04-2012, 06:28 PM   #28
conchscooter
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New Bonneville

I have sixty thousand trouble free miles on mine. Lovely multi-purpose bike that looks tons better looking than any Beemer.
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:25 PM   #29
JerryH
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At least the pipes still blue, they got something right, If you think the new ones have character, try riding a new one and a mid '60s model side by side. No comparison. The old ones actually felt like MOTORcycles. Just like pre '04 Sportsters. The new ones are 100% more reliable, but they don't come close to providing the same experience.

Not a really good comparison, but I have 2 scooters. One is an '08b Yamaha Vino 125. Smooth, reliable, electric start, twist and go, no clutch and no gears, stone reliable, and drop dead boring. A modern plastic transportation appliance.

The other one is a 1971 Vespa PX150. 2 stroke, kick start, premix gas, manual trans and clutch, 6 volt electrical system with no battery, and whatever you call the front suspension that Vespa used back then, very similar to a Honda Cub. Drum brakes on both ends, and tube type tires. But it also has a complete spare tire and wheel. It is noisy, it smokes, it can be finicky to get started, you have to mix the gas and oil, the suspension sucks (though the new seat is great), the shifting is clunky, and it squeaks and rattles.

Guess which one is more fun to ride. Hint: It's not the Yamaha.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:09 AM   #30
davidji
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if you need more "character" than the Bonnie, there is the Scrambler.
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