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Old 04-05-2012, 09:45 AM   #31
SomethingClever
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Quote:
At least the pipes still blue, they got something right, If you think the new ones have character, try riding a new one and a mid '60s model side by side. No comparison. The old ones actually felt like MOTORcycles. Just like pre '04 Sportsters. The new ones are 100% more reliable, but they don't come close to providing the same experience.
Serious question: Have you ridden one that has been de-restricted and fitted with a set of decent pipes? I fully admit that the modern Bonnies sound neutered out of the box, but it doesn't take much to wake them up.

I haven't ridden a '60s Bonnie, but I've ridden other ancient motorcycles that leak oil and vibrate... sail around in the wind... with forks that barely work... and brakes that work even less. In fact I rode one for like 5 years before I wised up
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Old 04-05-2012, 04:40 PM   #32
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If the stock pipes are too sedate for you, you can always opt for the Arrows. Here is my 2011 T100 I just bought with Arrow two-into-ones with no baffles. Sounds great with a nice low rumble and even without the baffles is not deafening, but you pay a bit of a price on mpg with these pipes. Although I have gotten mine up to about 48 mpg before while making an effort to ride easy. The pipes also up the hp, not sure how much, but this bike has some oomph and can hit the ton with lots of throttle left. Handling is great and I've yet to drag my peg, something that happened occasionally on my CB350. The tank is 4.2 gallons giving a decent range. The saddle is not great, but I will eventually replace mine with a Corbin. That said, the stock seat is not too bad, but I am used to 400 to 700 mile days on my '68 CB350 so anything is better than that seat by comparison. I have added a rear rack since the pic and my tailbag swaps right over that I use on my CB, along with tank bag, saddlebags, and windscreen (National Cycle Deflector DX). I am looking forward to some long trips on the Bonnie when I am not doing vintage rides on the CB.



Cheers,

Mike
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Old 04-05-2012, 04:47 PM   #33
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Just my opinion here Mike, but one of THE most attractive features on the new Bonnie are the "pea shooter" exhaust pipes! A 2 into 1 header......say you didn't!! Please. The "pea shooters" are works of ART!
Lyle
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:04 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by skysailor View Post
Just my opinion here Mike, but one of THE most attractive features on the new Bonnie are the "pea shooter" exhaust pipes!
I absolutely agree with that, yet the sound coming out of the stock pipes (gorgeous as they are) begs for improvement. Isn't there a pipe available that would retain the pea shooter look AND sound good as well?
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Old 04-05-2012, 06:07 PM   #35
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Maybe its just me, but most of the bikes that people say have "character" or "soul" have serious flaws. It seems that this euphemism for some horrid mechanical flaw. I have ridden some of these bikes and would never trade a modern bike for them. Sure, they required more personal involvement from the rider than the new ones do. Does that make the old ones better? I think not. Personally I like things that don't break. I had a '74 Scout that I loved....wouldn't trade my Tacoma for it.....EVER! The Tacoma works everyday! I actually had to buy two Scouts to create a single one....fun, but I don't have time for that anymore. And, I hate vehicles that leave me stranded.

When I bought my K8 Gixxer, the only other bike that was seriously in the running was a Bonnie. The new ones are great. Mods can be cheap. You probably won't even need the dealer. It is not fast, but it is fun. The BMW will be very expensive to maintain....the Bonnie not so much. If anything happens to the Bonnie much of it can be handled by the owner or local indy, try that with the BMW. I really like the K1200s...very hot bike, but the dealer network is limited and they are very complicated.

Just my NSHO.
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Old 04-05-2012, 06:41 PM   #36
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There are all sorts of Exhaust options for the new Bonnie a few that retain the peashooter look. Check out:

http://www.british-customs.com/

or

http://www.newbonneville.com/

My fI 09 T100 sounds better with stock exhaust than the ones I had originally heard with carbs. Maybe Triumph let loose a little sound when they converted to FI. I do plan on getting pipes though but will probably stick with the TORS with the factory tune for them. I wouldn't mind getting rid of the AI while I am at it.

But first I am doing a proper suspension. I am waiting on a set of Ohlins and will have Ricor Intiminators for the front forks installed at the same time. Can't wait for the suspension mods, but will have to wait a bit for the pipes.

Rick G
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Old 04-05-2012, 06:45 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skysailor View Post
Just my opinion here Mike, but one of THE most attractive features on the new Bonnie are the "pea shooter" exhaust pipes! A 2 into 1 header......say you didn't!! Please. The "pea shooters" are works of ART!
Lyle
Yeah, the peashooters look good and I would have been happy with them and the better mileage, but this was a deal I just couldn't pass up on a consignment bike with 3,500 miles and still under warranty until April of 2013 (<$7,000) and it was absolutely flawless. I had been looking for the right deal on a Bonnie for the last couple years. A friend of mine test drove some out in Nevada a while back, and the one thing he did not like was the (lack of) sound. He sadi at speed you couldn't even hear the motor. These Arrows are cool in their own way looks-wise, but not like the peashooters, but man, I mean, no one can say the growl of this thing has no character. There is a drawback to them, though, and that is that the stock centrestand won't fit with the Arrows on. I may look into buying one and modifying it.
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Old 04-05-2012, 07:54 PM   #38
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I would not say serious flaws, more like personality as opposed to the sewing machine that sort of looks like an old motorcycle.
Some years and models did suck, others were very good.
The later bikes had good brakes, electronic ignition, good carbs, were around 400 pounds, had cast wheels, held about 4 quarts of oil in the frame, had thick comfortable seats that flipped up for storage.
You could buy a new one, and ride it for years without issues if you did the usual maintenance on it.
They did vibrate a bit when you really got on it, which was where the character came from, that and the sound of the exhaust.

Not to say everyone should run out and get one, just that the new ones are not anything at all like the old ones in a bad way.




Quote:
Originally Posted by alii1959 View Post
Maybe its just me, but most of the bikes that people say have "character" or "soul" have serious flaws. It seems that this euphemism for some horrid mechanical flaw. I have ridden some of these bikes and would never trade a modern bike for them. Sure, they required more personal involvement from the rider than the new ones do. Does that make the old ones better? I think not. Personally I like things that don't break. I had a '74 Scout that I loved....wouldn't trade my Tacoma for it.....EVER! The Tacoma works everyday! I actually had to buy two Scouts to create a single one....fun, but I don't have time for that anymore. And, I hate vehicles that leave me stranded.

When I bought my K8 Gixxer, the only other bike that was seriously in the running was a Bonnie. The new ones are great. Mods can be cheap. You probably won't even need the dealer. It is not fast, but it is fun. The BMW will be very expensive to maintain....the Bonnie not so much. If anything happens to the Bonnie much of it can be handled by the owner or local indy, try that with the BMW. I really like the K1200s...very hot bike, but the dealer network is limited and they are very complicated.

Just my NSHO.
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:19 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post
I would not say serious flaws, more like personality as opposed to the sewing machine
What puzzles me endlessly is how vibration and breakdowns are considered personality traits, while reliability and smoothness somehow are not. Yes, I also look for a bike with character: smooth, reliable one.
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:59 PM   #40
SomethingClever
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Originally Posted by ferrix View Post
I absolutely agree with that, yet the sound coming out of the stock pipes (gorgeous as they are) begs for improvement. Isn't there a pipe available that would retain the pea shooter look AND sound good as well?
Norman Hyde Togas (what I have, pictured above) look closest to the 60s pipes and sound great. They're not as loud as some other options, but they are nice and robust sounding. And they deliver increased rwhp and torque when carbs/mapping is dialed accordingly.
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Old 04-06-2012, 12:43 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post
I have had many old Triumphs, and the new Bonneville, and a 1979 Bonneville and a 2005 at the same time, along with a 1969 Daytona.
The new ones are trouble free, but nothing like the older bikes, which were very light, had thick seats and handled better.
I never had electrical problems on my Triumphs, or any bike for that matter, as I pay attention to my bikes.

But most would not want to do a long trip on an old one. I did 9000 miles on my 1979 in a month, no problems other then a flat front tire at the Grand Canyon.
Lots of other 3000 to 4000 mile trips without issue as well.

The new ones, while not as good as the older ones in some respects, DO have electric start and are trouble free.
They need a seat upgrade for longer rides, and suspension work makes them better like most bikes...
They are over 100 pounds heavier then the old ones.

The old ones are now old, so its hard to compare against a new bike as far as reliability goes, but I had a new 79 in 1979 and ran it hard for many years and miles, in all weather, and it needed 3 speedo drives and 3 key switches.
The key switches just wore out, the speedo drive was just Italian crap. Very flimsy.
I traded the bike in on a new sportster in 1986. The Bonneville had 55,000 miles on it and was running fine. Great in fact.
The 2005 Bonneville lasted less then a year.
It was fine I suppose, it just needed a better seat to ride it cross country.
Why are you bashing Triumphs?
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Old 04-06-2012, 07:15 AM   #42
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I am not, they are what they are, good modern reliable bikes that sort of look like old ones.
I had one, and it did not turn me on after owning a number of older ones for many years and putting a LOT of miles on them.
I found the new one uncomfortable, over weight, and not so great handling.

With my 1979 T140D, I could ride it to work year round, ride it around the country, take a girl on the back in comfort for a long ride, and back in the day, take on most bikes and any car in the twisty's.

The new one was good for about an hour ride before the butt went numb, and even when dragging the pegs it was not going to keep up with most bikes in the turns (not including Harley's).

I am not sure where the weight came from, you would THINK that a bike that is 25 years newer would be faster, or better handling, or lighter, or have a better suspension, or be more comfortable, or might have a place to stash some gloves, but it did not and was not.
It had electric start, and was very smooth, and that was about it.

Not that it is a good thing really, but when you got on the old ones, it FELT like you were getting on it.
Hit 115 mph and it felt like warp speed, you really felt like you were going fast.
Hit 115 on the new ones and it feels fast only because of the wobbles.

But for what is out there for sale new, it would be one of my bigger street bike picks, the V7 classic, an old sportster, the new Bonneville.
The V7 classic is electric start, shaft drive, and 400 pounds, about what the old Bonnevilles were, but with electric start. Somehow they managed to keep the weight down and still have electric start AND shaft drive.




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Why are you bashing Triumphs?
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Old 04-06-2012, 11:58 AM   #43
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Sorry I thought that's what we were supposed to dow in these kinds of threads. Wait until at least page 3 then start crying "bashing" like a rotten little child having a sugar induced meltdown becasue somebody said something they didn't agree with.
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Old 04-06-2012, 03:54 PM   #44
LWRider
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A few have mentioned that the old Bonnies were lighter (implying better performance) so that got my curiosity going. Bikez had some info on both old and new Bonnies. I found that the '77 Bonnie T140 weighed 435 wet and put out 49hp. The 2011 Bonnie T00 weighs 495 wet and puts out 67hp (stock pipes, the Arrows probably add 10hp to that, just a guess based on what my Triumph dealer told me). That makes the old Bonnie 8.88 lb per hp while the new has 7.39 lbs per hp with stock pipes and 6.42 lbs per hp for the Arrow pipes. Weight is relative. Not that I don't ove old Bonnevilles, I do. Just was interesting when I looked that up.

Cheers,

Mike
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Old 04-06-2012, 09:31 PM   #45
NJ-Brett
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And the 1979 T140D was 20 pounds lighter, having a 2 into 1 exhaust (made a bit more power also).
The weight was VERY low in the fame, which made it feel even lighter.
My New Bonneville was a 2005 which had a smaller motor and just as much weight as the new ones.

But even so, you would think 25 years would show bigger results, after all, the new ones are close to 900cc's no?
If it was a 750, would it be any different at all?
And, in 1979, the design was about 20 years old I think, with the basic overall design much older.
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