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Old 05-14-2014, 04:45 PM   #1
AKjitsu OP
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ABS question.

As it turns out, my new Multistrada has scalable ABS. You can select a setting of 1 through 8 (8 being the most intrusive). I'm setting up one riding mode for rain/slick stuff. I've got the traction control set at it's most intrusive and was ready to set the ABS at same. Then I recall reading that the ABS on the older GS's was so intrusive that you ended up with no brakes on very slippery downhill slopes.

This got me to thinking; where should I set the ABS at for slippery conditions? I suppose I could experiment but, that could result in something loud, expensive, and embarrassing.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 05-15-2014, 05:05 AM   #2
Navy Chief
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AKjitsu View Post
As it turns out, my new Multistrada has scalable ABS. You can select a setting of 1 through 8 (8 being the most intrusive). I'm setting up one riding mode for rain/slick stuff. I've got the traction control set at it's most intrusive and was ready to set the ABS at same. Then I recall reading that the ABS on the older GS's was so intrusive that you ended up with no brakes on very slippery downhill slopes.

This got me to thinking; where should I set the ABS at for slippery conditions? I suppose I could experiment but, that could result in something loud, expensive, and embarrassing.

Thanks in advance.
Turn off ABS riding in the dirt or gravel, problem solved....
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Old 05-15-2014, 05:12 AM   #3
markk53
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If you did decide to experiment, do it on a nice flat open area where you have room in the event you either need to let off brakes or overshoot your stopping point. Don't do it where the stopping distance is vital to your well being.

Also may help with knowing what to do on an actual slippery paved surface as well.
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Old 05-15-2014, 09:29 AM   #4
ph0rk
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Does the bike come with a preset rain setting, or is there a suggestion in the manual?

I'd guess for wet pavement you'd want intrusive. The computer will figure it out faster than you will, because if you knew where the threshold was you wouldn't have engaged ABS in the first place. Wet non-pavement you'd want as little ABS as possible, but in both situations I'd hope you're already taking things pretty easy.
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Old 05-15-2014, 06:38 PM   #5
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Oh , yeah. EVERYBODY rides like old women on wet dirt. God forbid you catch a nice powerslide.
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Old 05-15-2014, 07:29 PM   #6
PeterW
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Test it, personally I'd suggest gravel, a lose there is usually slower than on a slick wet surface. Find a decent stretch of gravel with a good runoff, get up some speed and hit the brakes at some marker point hard enough that the ABS kicks in.

Repeat at the various settings and pick the one that gave you the shortest stopping distance. You should be able to pull the fuse and check with no-ABS as well. That won't be perfect everywhere, but better than guessing.

The ABS on my bike isn't variable, but I did a number of runs like that, and the ABS mostly did better with mine (9/10) so I cancelled any plans I had to add an off switch. When I factored in distance from reaction times (on the test runs I *knew* where I was going to start braking, real world, not so lucky) the ABS was a clear winner.

Pete
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Old 05-16-2014, 12:44 PM   #7
AKjitsu OP
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Originally Posted by PeterW View Post
Test it, personally I'd suggest gravel, a lose there is usually slower than on a slick wet surface. Find a decent stretch of gravel with a good runoff, get up some speed and hit the brakes at some marker point hard enough that the ABS kicks in.

Repeat at the various settings and pick the one that gave you the shortest stopping distance. You should be able to pull the fuse and check with no-ABS as well. That won't be perfect everywhere, but better than guessing.

The ABS on my bike isn't variable, but I did a number of runs like that, and the ABS mostly did better with mine (9/10) so I cancelled any plans I had to add an off switch. When I factored in distance from reaction times (on the test runs I *knew* where I was going to start braking, real world, not so lucky) the ABS was a clear winner.

Pete
Good thinking.

As it turns out, the Gen II Multistradas do have a 0 setting for both ABS and traction control.
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Old 05-17-2014, 07:19 AM   #8
H96669
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Has Jooey started riding dirty back roads so he can comment on large ABS equipped motorcycles in such conditions? I am not sure of that his profile in other forums clearly indicates "street only".

I have him on ignore....let me guess he is posting something that makes him look better than other members and demeans their riding abilities????

There is a local rider here with a Strada. I'll talk to him about "that" dirty back road I went up on the K1200RS a couple days ago.I was almost at the top but I did turn back and I sure doubt a Strada or GS could have safely made it up there anyway.

Always interesting coming down them roads with very heavy road bikes without an ABS disabling function. If I have time I'll ride all the way east next summer if just to go ride some dirty back roads with my friend there, he bought a Strada last year. And a heck of a good rider, way better than me and most probably Jooey. Will be interesting to compare the handling of our big pigs on them steep loose gravel roads in the Appalachian hills of southern Quebec.
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Old 05-17-2014, 08:30 AM   #9
windblown101
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Everyones opinion on what a "good" level of ABS to have is going to vary.

As others have said - test it for yourself. That is the ONLY way you will find out what works best for you and you are most comfortable with.

I like ABS on my KTM SM-T. I can power slide all I want on the loose stuff in order to steer with the rear if I'm inclined to and the ABS is there as a backup during braking. I generally have my "fun" on the gas and when I want to stop I want to stop. I feel the ABS kick in for a moment once a month or so if I'm riding gravel roads a lot.

On a light bike with knobbies I have no use for ABS off pavement. Knobbies do not react the same way as r street tires or 80/20 tires when locked up.
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