ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Fluff > Shiny things
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 3 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 04-17-2012, 02:01 PM   #46
Brunow - 007
Bantam Fever
 
Brunow - 007's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Oddometer: 308
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krabill View Post
One of our latest Solidworks projects.

Virtual:



Reality:


Nice work! How is the sheet metal in solidworks?

Proffesional use:
I use it a lot in autodesk inventor 2012. With the right K value - bend loss you really can tweak those bends.

Home use:
Alibre. Cheap but ... allway's one step behind... (And sheet metal just ... aint what it could be)
__________________
Working on the D14/4 Bsa Daily Driver .
Brunow - 007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2012, 05:11 PM   #47
reelfish
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Oddometer: 86
I have been a machinist for 33 years been using cad/cam for at least 30. I started with a system called microcad a pc based system from Lockheed then moved to Catia huge difference between the two. The engineers did not like the machinist using the catia so the shop got us Tek-soft and them Gibbs-cam which is a apple based system then. Them Mastercam started to show up. If someone wanted to us just the cad we also had a version of Autocad that was dos driven system. Now to this date I have been using Gibbs-Cam and MasterCam both have there ups and downs. What I would like to learn is Pro-E But our shop is to cheap to go that route.
reelfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2012, 05:37 PM   #48
LuciferMutt
Rides slow bike slow
 
LuciferMutt's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: New(er) Mexico
Oddometer: 11,095
I use acad 2004 at work just to make 2d third angle projection drawings of small parts I design and fabricate. It does what I need it to, but I'm nowhere NEAR an expert with it. I use the same two templates for everything and almost never use layers, etc.

I just use it to draw straight lines

I have used MasterCam in the past and like it. My department can't afford a single of seat of it at the moment..
__________________
You couldn't hear a dump truck driving through a nitro glycerin plant!

Badasses might screw with another badass. Nobody screws with a nut job. -- Plaka
LuciferMutt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2012, 03:17 AM   #49
AZbiker
Crunkin' with crackers
 
AZbiker's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: Phoenix, in the Arcadia area
Oddometer: 6,949
Quote:
Originally Posted by McCormack View Post
I have one seat open and am trying to fill, but there just does not seem to be candidates in this area looking for CAD work. I really don't get it.
I'd love to be drafting again, but not there.

I would be confined to the states of NH and VT for the rest of my life.

As soon as I get my A+ and Network+ certs (fallback) I'm going to start looking again.

I know what you mean about "readable plans"--I've seen plenty drawn by people that wouldn't know the meaning of lineweight if it was shoved up their ass. These same people also seem to be fond of shading large parts of the drawing in colors. I guess they don't have a clue that once the drawing leaves there office it's going to be printed in black and white and that pretty colored shading is going to be unreadable.

I saw tons of this when I was a mapper--lots of boundary surveys that don't close as written because the asshats drawing them don't understand direction.
__________________
rubber side down,

derek

http://azbiker.smugmug.com

Got SmugMug? If not, save some cash and use my code: McYdbycdcvM5Q
AZbiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2012, 04:01 AM   #50
Bongolia
stop acting
 
Bongolia's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: In transit
Oddometer: 16,822
I'm a Structural Engineer (buildings) and taught myself how to use Autocad R12 when I worked in the Caribbean on a small island (no draughtsmen, had to do all the drawings ourselves )

I use it all the time now for smaller 2D stuff, mainly plans and projections and also for detail development when I have tricky connections and the like to work out.

It's a great tool. The new solid modelling stuff looks amazing. Our company are moving towards BIM/Revit in a big way.
__________________
Former Farmer.
G 850 LM Mk II
Bongolia is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2012, 08:05 AM   #51
Krabill
Beastly Adventurer
 
Krabill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Tulsa, OK
Oddometer: 4,703
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brunow - 007 View Post
Nice work! How is the sheet metal in solidworks?

Proffesional use:
I use it a lot in autodesk inventor 2012. With the right K value - bend loss you really can tweak those bends.

Home use:
Alibre. Cheap but ... allway's one step behind... (And sheet metal just ... aint what it could be)
The sheetmetal tools in Solidworks are great.

We have both Inventor and Solidworks, but use SW exclusively now. A couple of the big pluses for SW is the file management - one file per weldment instead of each piece having its own file in Inventor, and the structural components are much, much simpler in SW than Inventor. We do a lot of structural steel design (as you can see) and in SW it's just a matter of drawing centerlines and telling it which steel member to put along each line. Super simple, fast, and easy.
__________________
Loud Sucks!
www.wrrdualsport.com
www.designatedvaping.com <- for all your electronic cigarette needs
Krabill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2012, 09:56 AM   #52
McCormack OP
eltiT resU motsuC
 
McCormack's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Location: NH
Oddometer: 6,836
Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaSteve View Post
I find that astonishing that you're still in plain Autocad. By tall structures do you mean thing like tanks and platforms or actual architectural buildings? I could see the former but def not the latter. I hear you about finding good talent. Forget good. I'd settle for bright eager and interested. I've been put in situations many times where I've been forced to train some managers or important clients disinterested and idiotic relative who thought it was all just entering stuff into a machine all day. How hard is that? Thankfully I've got last word on talent these days.
We're in a very specialized industry and just haven't needed anything more than straight AutoCAD.

For instance, a large portion of our output is reinforced concrete drawings, which basically only requires line work, dimensions and text.

Increasingly we have been using 3D modelling for our structural steel work, but even then, our framing is pretty basic (all on one plane) and conventional 2D drafting works great and is efficient.

Having said that, it would be nice to have all our framing modeled and be able to automatically pull weights from the program.

So maybe I'll take another look at SW or Inventor once I get a lull in my workload.
McCormack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2012, 04:32 PM   #53
Grreatdog
Beastly Adventurer
 
Grreatdog's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Annapolis, MD
Oddometer: 10,294
That pretty much mirrors our company. We have five structural PE's doing mostly bridge and retaining wall design. They all get by on either straight up Microstation (really PowerDraft) or AutoCAD for most of their drafting. Their computations and modelling are done with other specialized programs. But pretty much all of the drafting is just straight up 2D CAD work. Bridge plans are actually remarkably simple things to draw.
__________________
640E, MXC200, XT200
Grreatdog is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2012, 10:18 AM   #54
FloridaSteve
Beastly Adventurer
 
FloridaSteve's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Jacksonville Florida
Oddometer: 2,082
Wow. Structural and bridges are not my thing but that's amazing to me. I'm looking at a fully realized and annotated 3D gravity sewer and storm systems with existing and proposed grades on my other screen as I type this. Before Civil this would have been weeks of drafitng. Now if I have quality survey (a freaking rarity unfortunately) and some general design parameters (this can also be hard to get sometimes) I can get the preliminary design in front of a PE with plans AND profiles in a few days at the most. Typical edits take minutes instead of days.

And you know what occurs to me. We still like to complain about how long things take sometimes! We are a strange species with a short memory..
FloridaSteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2012, 02:22 PM   #55
Grreatdog
Beastly Adventurer
 
Grreatdog's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Annapolis, MD
Oddometer: 10,294
That is how our civil/site PE's work. We feed them 3D topo and they model roads, sewers, storm drains, etc. using various templates and other automation with InRoads or Geopak. Generating a set of plans is very automated.

But our structural department is a whole different animal. I guess it doesn't take a lot of CAD power to draw rebar, weld symbols and bolt holes. Watching them scribble on 10x10 grid sheets gives me bad vibes.
__________________
640E, MXC200, XT200
Grreatdog is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2012, 05:23 PM   #56
pinocono
Husky Dü
 
pinocono's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: the 'Nard
Oddometer: 442
Solidworks has transformed my job. I've been in precision sheet metal fab for the past 27 years, and 20 years ago I worked my way off the shop floor and was using a dedicated CAM program to develop CNC code for turret punch presses (and later lasers). I had to create flat pattern developments in a 2D environment, and for the most part it was pretty straight forward. Some jobs with more complicated geometry and/or assembly required a lot of calculator work.

12 years ago we picked up a seat of SolidWorks because we landed a huge job for the Big Mouse, and everything was done in SW, both the sheet metal and parts for the machine shop (we have 4 Haas CNC mills as well). I pretty much jumped into the deep end of the pool, and it's made all the difference in my career.

Back then, we had 2 guys programming, with another checking our output before it hit the floor. Now there's just me, and I've taken over job planning as well. SW has made our work much more efficient.

It's also cool working in a place where I can get a few g-jobs done for myself.

Dave
__________________
'11 Husky TE630
'07 H-D FLTRI
'99 H-D FXD
pinocono is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2012, 06:35 PM   #57
FloridaSteve
Beastly Adventurer
 
FloridaSteve's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Jacksonville Florida
Oddometer: 2,082
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinocono View Post
It's also cool working in a place where I can get a few g-jobs done for myself.Dave
Oh you lucky dog! What I'd give for that sort of shot.
FloridaSteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2012, 09:22 AM   #58
OaklandStrom
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: East Bay
Oddometer: 1,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaSteve View Post
Really cool. I'd love to get my hands on a copy of solidworks! There's a 2 stroke engine crankcase I'd LOVE to draw up. I's doable in plain Autocad (3D functionality is pretty cool) but I doubt I could ever get a cnc file out of it. When I get to work tomorrow I'll post up a screen grab of some of the cooler site development work I've done.
Steve,

I also wanted to get a copy of SolidWorks, but it's far too expensive to own, unless the boss is buying it. Fortunately, Autodesk is getting more serious about getting 3d drawing into the hands of regular guys.

123D is in final beta right now, and downloadable. It's Autodesk's answer to Sketchup. It's a decent solution for drawing parts and assemblies. It's not something I'd draw an entire nuke plant with, but for moto parts, furniture, garden sheds, etc, it should be fine. It's free for now, and will continue to be free, although there may be a "pro" version at some point.

There's also Inventor LT, which is less than $1,000 (and rumored to be getting a price drop very soon). It does just about everything Inventor does. I haven't used it, but have spoken with an Inventor instructor.

TechShop is a third possibility. If you are in the Bay Area, Detroit or RDU, NC - it's a place where for $100 a month, you have access to computers with all Adobe & Autodesk software, as well as mills, lathes, a wood shop, welding shop, waterjet, CNC plasma cutter, sheet metal tools, sewing, laser cutters, and much more. Assuming you're in Florida, it may not be an option for you. Brooklyn & LA are being planned, according to their website.
OaklandStrom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2012, 02:16 PM   #59
JNRobert
Breaking Wind
 
JNRobert's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Bay Area, California
Oddometer: 9,659
Quote:
Originally Posted by OaklandStrom View Post
Steve,

TechShop is a third possibility. If you are in the Bay Area, Detroit or RDU, NC - it's a place where for $100 a month, you have access to computers with all Adobe & Autodesk software, as well as mills, lathes, a wood shop, welding shop, waterjet, CNC plasma cutter, sheet metal tools, sewing, laser cutters, and much more. Assuming you're in Florida, it may not be an option for you. Brooklyn & LA are being planned, according to their website.


Is fifty too old to make a career change
__________________
Crusader of Slack
JNRobert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2012, 08:38 PM   #60
OaklandStrom
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: East Bay
Oddometer: 1,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by JNRobert View Post


Is fifty too old to make a career change
Perhaps, but you can spend some of your free time making cool stuff. Then it's a hobby, not a job.
OaklandStrom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 06:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014