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Old 05-08-2013, 01:29 PM   #121
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Originally Posted by DriveShaft View Post
Is that what it looks like? Shhooooot.

Half the challenge is just figuring out the "layout" of commands on this version of ACAD/AA. When I worked it, I had a dedicated digitizer, w/ all the important commands laid out nicely on the digitizer, and I could fly that thing pretty damn fast. It helped that I had a good sense of spatial relationships. But what's killing me now is just basic things like trying to remember how the hell you get the area measurement of a polyline space to friggin' show up. That, and where the hell the damn hatch tool is on the little floating menus...which I still can't figure out.

I do surprise myself in how much I remember, through the cobwebs. I was hammering out relative coordinates, and making UCS's in no time.
The ribbon that AutoCAD took from Office is quite nice. I'm able to have all controls at the top of my screen, freeing up real estate. Those toolbars you have are old school.

Likewise, I can't recommend getting to know the Properties window enough. There are so many edits that can be accomplished with it, as well as checking parameters (polyline areas, etc). Between the Properties window and the Match Properties tool, you can do anything.
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Old 05-09-2013, 06:39 AM   #122
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Was Viz Viz? I bought Autodesk Viz 4 trying to get into the 3D home design and quickly realized I just threw thousands out the window!! That was good times. I'm really into Revit. Self taught with a stack of books and all the forums around the web.
We're almost all Solidworks here now, so I haven't kept up with Autodesk's newest offerings, but 3D Studio Viz was the "light" version of 3D Studio Max, which is the 3D animation software that was used to make movies like Toy Story.

The "Viz" version was just a cut-down version that while didn't have all the functionality of Max, it worked very well for making 3D video walk-arounds and walk-throughs of buildings so our customers could see what they were going to get before we actually went ahead and finalized plans.

Now I do stuff like this . . .

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Old 05-09-2013, 07:01 AM   #123
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We're almost all Solidworks here now, so I haven't kept up with Autodesk's newest offerings, but 3D Studio Viz was the "light" version of 3D Studio Max, which is the 3D animation software that was used to make movies like Toy Story.

The "Viz" version was just a cut-down version that while didn't have all the functionality of Max, it worked very well for making 3D video walk-arounds and walk-throughs of buildings so our customers could see what they were going to get before we actually went ahead and finalized plans.

Now I do stuff like this . . .

That's impressive. I have limited 3D experience (mostly just partial structural assemblies, such as steel framing or various platform layouts). I'm working on a very large power plant upgrade and it boggles my mind to see so much of the project modeled in 3D. We're talking all pipe runs, framing, platforms, handrails, etc.

Things like office buildings seem mostly simple compared to these structures (there is so much information packed into it, and none of the parts are really the same from one point to another). The time to assemble it must be immense. Updating it all per revisions must be something!
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Old 05-09-2013, 08:15 AM   #124
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Originally Posted by McCormack View Post
The ribbon that AutoCAD took from Office is quite nice. I'm able to have all controls at the top of my screen, freeing up real estate. Those toolbars you have are old school.

Likewise, I can't recommend getting to know the Properties window enough. There are so many edits that can be accomplished with it, as well as checking parameters (polyline areas, etc). Between the Properties window and the Match Properties tool, you can do anything.
Im not liking the ribbon at all in AutoCad. I have mine set to classic with the same layout oddly as when I had R14 as now with 2014. Just habit. The ribbon is too time consuming jumping around the tabs for me. Though Revit has the ribbon only so I have to use it there. Working on setting up the keyboard quick commands to speed things up.
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Old 05-09-2013, 08:24 AM   #125
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Just finished this yesterday. Basically more garage than house but that's what the customer wanted. A 16' x 16' garage door for his Prevost bus. The RV side is 60' deep. A 12' tall ceiling in the 3 car garage next to it that will have lifts installed to fit 6 cars. And it's on the water for his 50' yacht in the backyard

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Old 05-09-2013, 08:34 AM   #126
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Originally Posted by McCormack View Post
That's impressive. I have limited 3D experience (mostly just partial structural assemblies, such as steel framing or various platform layouts). I'm working on a very large power plant upgrade and it boggles my mind to see so much of the project modeled in 3D. We're talking all pipe runs, framing, platforms, handrails, etc.

Things like office buildings seem mostly simple compared to these structures (there is so much information packed into it, and none of the parts are really the same from one point to another). The time to assemble it must be immense. Updating it all per revisions must be something!
It does take time, but when you break it down into little bity pieces, it all comes together in the end.

Revisions aren't so bad when using something like Solidworks since it is all parametric. If you change a part, all of the drawings that that part is in update themselves automatically. Much easier and quicker than AutoCAD. Back when we did all this in 2D, even a simple revision could take hours just to make sure you fixed it in every view and every drawing that pertained to the fix. In Solidworks, it just takes a few minutes and you're done.
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Old 05-09-2013, 08:51 AM   #127
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Im not liking the ribbon at all in AutoCad. I have mine set to classic with the same layout oddly as when I had R14 as now with 2014. Just habit. The ribbon is too time consuming jumping around the tabs for me. Though Revit has the ribbon only so I have to use it there. Working on setting up the keyboard quick commands to speed things up.
I avoided the ribbon for quite a while, then spent an afternoon getting it setup the way I want it (all typical commands are on one ribbon, without tabs (tabs too, but for the stuff I rarely use)).

I've found it to be a much better way to work, and I'm someone who never uses keyboard inputs.
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Old 05-09-2013, 08:52 AM   #128
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i'm pretty much a complete cad noob. a mate says he can arrange for some shorter dog bones for the DR650 to be lasercut on the back of other jobs they are doing.

downloaded a freebie program, QCAD, but couldn't figure out how to draw anything. i'm a graphic designer by trade so knocked up the design in illustrator, exported as a dwg file then opened that with QCAD and saved it as a dxf.

it all looked fine but the laser cutter said the lines are broken and it's not usable. this probably isn't the right thread to be asking for noob help, but anyone know where i might be going wrong? would it be better to export as a pdf from illustrator and use a particular bit of software to export as a dxf?

any tips appreciated!
It may be possible to export from Illustrator as a DXF. If not, ask him if he can import EPS or PDF. There's no need for you to use a CAD program.
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Old 05-09-2013, 09:42 AM   #129
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I avoided the ribbon for quite a while, then spent an afternoon getting it setup the way I want it (all typical commands are on one ribbon, without tabs (tabs too, but for the stuff I rarely use)).

I've found it to be a much better way to work, and I'm someone who never uses keyboard inputs.
While I do use a lot of keyboard shortcuts, I did set up my ribbon for me. I created a tab with all of the commands I need regularly and it works quite well.

With every revision, I try to use the new layouts and processes and most of them have shown to help with the workflow.
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Old 05-09-2013, 10:14 AM   #130
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It does take time, but when you break it down into little bity pieces, it all comes together in the end.

Revisions aren't so bad when using something like Solidworks since it is all parametric. If you change a part, all of the drawings that that part is in update themselves automatically. Much easier and quicker than AutoCAD. Back when we did all this in 2D, even a simple revision could take hours just to make sure you fixed it in every view and every drawing that pertained to the fix. In Solidworks, it just takes a few minutes and you're done.
I did a ton of 3-d truss work when I worked on this one air-supported structure project back in the '90s. It was autocad 3d modeling we used, facilitated mostly by the use of xrefs, and blocks. The one thing about that experience that bugged me was that you could not locate each block based on mating surfaces. All locations were fixed, based on where you initially set things. So if you changed, say, the length of a component, there was no rule telling mating pieces to move accordingly. It just allows interference. Does SW offer a way to handle interferences and/or calculated locations more elegantly?
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Old 05-09-2013, 01:03 PM   #131
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It may be possible to export from Illustrator as a DXF. If not, ask him if he can import EPS or PDF. There's no need for you to use a CAD program.
thanks, oaklanstrom. good point and it would solve all the issues. the problem is illustrator really botches the file up when exporting as a dxf, or at least its not CAD-friendly.
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Old 05-10-2013, 07:01 PM   #132
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We do cooler stuff at work but I design stuff I need for my bike, like a flag mount for the Tiger.


And a bracket to hold shear pins for my snow thrower.


We print them out on a Stratasys 3D printer.
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Old 05-14-2013, 06:34 AM   #133
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...if someone has a list of keyboard shortcuts for Autodesk Inventor, please post them.
The more I work with this program the more I hate it....
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Old 05-14-2013, 09:02 AM   #134
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...if someone has a list of keyboard shortcuts for Autodesk Inventor, please post them.
The more I work with this program the more I hate it....
We were just working with a school using Inventor to print some things out for them. The STL files were the wrong scale and had open faces - three times.

Finally just told them "Send me the IGES files." Brought them in to SW, pushed out the STL's, done.
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Old 05-14-2013, 10:07 AM   #135
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I did a ton of 3-d truss work when I worked on this one air-supported structure project back in the '90s. It was autocad 3d modeling we used, facilitated mostly by the use of xrefs, and blocks. The one thing about that experience that bugged me was that you could not locate each block based on mating surfaces. All locations were fixed, based on where you initially set things. So if you changed, say, the length of a component, there was no rule telling mating pieces to move accordingly. It just allows interference. Does SW offer a way to handle interferences and/or calculated locations more elegantly?
Oh, yes. In Solidworks, you mate the parts in the assembly the way you want to. You can mate them by hole locations, or mating surface, or angle, or distance, or, or, or . . .

Changes and revisions are one of the biggest pluses of SW. Modify a part, and the assembly, detail drawing, etc. all update to reflect the changes you made.
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