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Old 03-24-2013, 06:27 PM   #646
Ditch
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Old 03-25-2013, 08:47 AM   #647
Brian011952
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Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Rider View Post
Here's a few new things in the ongoing evolution into making the FE570 my perfect lightweight ADVenture bike.
It's the little things.



Chain guide, thanks to Lukas providing the part #'s.






My chain has been hitting the tire once again, doesn't matter how it's adjusted, it's chunking the tire running it tight or loose, methinks that once a chain get a certain amount of miles on it, this having around 5000 on it, that it just stretches enough allowing enough side to side movement when slabbing long miles. So instead of replacing a chain that still just fine in every other way I'm trying out the KTM SM guide.
It only took drilling and tapping one hole, using the existing hole that holds the chain slider in, I trimmed about an inch off the slider to fit the guide, so far so good.






Brian, looking forward to seeing what you come up with, I would be interested in making a skid plate with storage, no interest in complicating fuel storage for me though. I have a large metal supply store locally that sells every kind of metal imaginable and allows you to pick through their stock and get leftover pieces at a large discount compared to ordering sheets. Could probably make one for a fraction of the cost without the filler necks and bungs.
I always thought it could be cost effective to just buy the cheap aluminum skid plate for Husa's found on ebay and then add a tool box to it to reduce the labor and need to design of the plate itself, but you could be onto something.
Good luck!
Thanks for the advice on the Chain Guide. I'm running the Supersprox chain a nd sprocket combo, but my chain, as it has broken in hits my tire too. I'm ordering that guide set up. I'd seen it on here before and forgotten about it, you reminded me. BTW, the Skid Plate Tank Project is in full swing. Yesterday I finally got access to a nice break and plasma arc cutter. It took a few hours, but it is all bent and cut out now. I have the fuel tap bungs and a high quality screw in cap (dune buggy supply shop). Basically, I need a little more time to do a little final fitting and to touch the edges for the welder. It is looking really good, and I discovered something interesting while building it. There is a huge open space directly behind the engine, and by just extending the skid plate a couple inches, I was able to make a nice mounting pad for a micro fuel pump. I looked at the lift capability for these pumps, and it is 2.5 feet, so I should have no problem placing the pump here, and plumbing it to the 70 Degree tank for fuel transfer. Anyway, that's just a progress report. I'll post pictures when i'm finished. I've also decided to have some mounting tabs welded to the back of the tank in front of the shifter so I can attach a few items here like maybe an MSR bottle with engine oil. I'm pretty excited about this project, it is coming out very nice and my volume calculations put it at 2.49 gallons, but I've reduced that due to the bends and angles. I think it will be right at 2.0 gallons when I'm finished.
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Old 03-29-2013, 06:25 AM   #648
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Originally Posted by Brian011952 View Post
Thanks for the advice on the Chain Guide. I'm running the Supersprox chain a nd sprocket combo, but my chain, as it has broken in hits my tire too. I'm ordering that guide set up. I'd seen it on here before and forgotten about it, you reminded me. BTW, the Skid Plate Tank Project is in full swing. Yesterday I finally got access to a nice break and plasma arc cutter. It took a few hours, but it is all bent and cut out now. I have the fuel tap bungs and a high quality screw in cap (dune buggy supply shop). Basically, I need a little more time to do a little final fitting and to touch the edges for the welder. It is looking really good, and I discovered something interesting while building it. There is a huge open space directly behind the engine, and by just extending the skid plate a couple inches, I was able to make a nice mounting pad for a micro fuel pump. I looked at the lift capability for these pumps, and it is 2.5 feet, so I should have no problem placing the pump here, and plumbing it to the 70 Degree tank for fuel transfer. Anyway, that's just a progress report. I'll post pictures when i'm finished. I've also decided to have some mounting tabs welded to the back of the tank in front of the shifter so I can attach a few items here like maybe an MSR bottle with engine oil. I'm pretty excited about this project, it is coming out very nice and my volume calculations put it at 2.49 gallons, but I've reduced that due to the bends and angles. I think it will be right at 2.0 gallons when I'm finished.
I met with the welder today and made a plan. It looks like around $200 to get it welded up, and he offered some really good suggestions on adding a mount for more strength, and has offered to weld it up as I go so that I can make fit adjustments as we go. I was impressed with the advice and the helpful attitude. All in all, I'll be around $400 into this tank. I can live with that.
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:14 PM   #649
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian011952 View Post
I met with the welder today and made a plan. It looks like around $200 to get it welded up, and he offered some really good suggestions on adding a mount for more strength, and has offered to weld it up as I go so that I can make fit adjustments as we go. I was impressed with the advice and the helpful attitude. All in all, I'll be around $400 into this tank. I can live with that.
Sounds like a great project Brian. Looking forward to your pix of it.
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Old 04-11-2013, 09:46 PM   #650
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Dry Spell

Wow, It's been a dry spell on here. I promise not to comment on the tank until it's finished and I can post pictures if you gys start posting again. i enjoy the posts since I'm kind of stuck in an indoor environment for another two months before I can go ride again. No, it's not jail, it's a education opportunity provided by my employer.
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Old 04-12-2013, 12:30 PM   #651
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Bio-Dome?
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Old 04-14-2013, 07:21 AM   #652
Brian011952
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Bio-Dome?
I wish! That would have some cool factor.
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Old 04-24-2013, 08:50 AM   #653
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MEFO Tires

I'm dropping a plug for the MEFO tires. Yes, they are not a knobbie, but at 1500 miles, the rear tire is showing very little wear. If you are sick of changing tires all the time, I recommend MEFO Explorer rear tires. Truthfully, the only places where I've missed having a knobbie has been in really loose off camber corners and in the mud. In every other area, the MEFO has had sufficient traction, that has included snow covered roads.

I believe the MEFO will outlast a conventional knobbie three to one at the current rate of wear, and it may possibly go even further.
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Old 04-25-2013, 11:48 AM   #654
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Brian, did you never finish your bash plate? Have been waiting patiently on some pics!
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Old 04-25-2013, 12:02 PM   #655
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Lost, since your are currently broke I figure I would try to keep you busy for a minute.

Planning to attend a trip to a bike rally in Tennessee in a couple of weeks and since truck parking is limited and my truck is running poorly I was thinking about riding my bike. It is about 300 miles via highway so i figure about 350 with back roads. I have the ability to carry everything I need on the bike and have a comfy Renazco seat so that wouldn't be a problem. Will be running a fresh d606 on the rear and a brand new mt21 on the front. No GPS except for my phone. Will carry to liter fuel bottles to extend my range. Will have a spare tube, levers, tools, med kit, and camping gear.

My problem is that most of the route will be asphalt and I am nervous about riding that far. I have all day plus part of a morning to get there but only about 8 hrs to get back. Other than Beta you seem to ride the most most miles on one of these bikes. Would you have a problem riding that far? Anything to prepare for? This is my first street bike and would be my first long ride of any sort. From what I have read it seems you regularly ride this far on your trips but how often do you do it on all slab?

Thanks for any help. Hope you get well soon and post some more awesome photos!
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Old 04-25-2013, 05:10 PM   #656
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Thank you, I'll do my best to answer your questions. It's a nice distraction.
I'm working on a packing/camping gear update too... with my pain meds my ability to think straight comes and goes as I go through the ups and downs between doses.


First of all, a long trip is just a bunch of short trips strung together, besides being true when you think of it like that it's less stressful.


I regularly ride 300+ miles in one go to get somewhere different then get off pavement, longest is 850 in a day on the Husa, all interstate. That one hurt, but the satisfaction at the end of the day for what I accomplished made it worth it to me. (had to get home for a gig)
It might sound horrible to some, but I find long distance pavement travels part necessity, and part of the challenges that make ADV riding fun for me. But I'm coming from more of a street/Dual Sport background instead of a dirkbiker moving to street rides. It's all fun to me.
I especially like passing guys with bikes in the back of their trucks, especially in crappy weather for the looks I get as I wave going by in total comfort, and using a fraction of the fuel they are.
Or the poor guy with the "kill me now" look at you as you go by on YOUR adventure with him in the beige minivan with the screaming kids in back fighting over what DVD to watch, uninterested wife with her nose deep in a People magazine.
Part of the fun for me, but in the end I just like to ride more than drive any day.

Using some of these suggestions I hope you find the same enjoyment I do traveling on the husa.
Sometimes it take a good full day on the road to clear my head, changing time zones or crossing state lines, then I'm ready for some trails.

OK enough babbling... 350 miles if you don't mess around much should take you about 6-7 hours on two lane, 5-6 on interstate. Sometimes I take the longer more scenic route on two lane country roads, many times I just choose to go the shortest route on an interstate. Just depends on the ride, time limits and goals. With a GPS I can choose shortest distance or fastest time, I'm sure you can preplan that or have a good ole paper map and give your self options, it's good to be able to decide on the fly instead of making yourself sticking to a plan sometimes. Part of being Lost, or having the "journey not destination" attitude.

I usually don't cruise more than 70 mph both to help with tire/chain wear and fatigue from the wind, usually closer to 65. Slower is faster. With my 14/45 gearing the bike just purrs at these speeds with the throttle barely cracked open, very smooth.
It's important to find your balance while on the highway, you should be leaning just right into the wind so you're not holding on with a death grip, if you hands, forearms, or wrists are hurting, you're doing it wrong and should work on finding that spot where you can just about let go of the bars while riding and stay in balance. You should be ale to ride with just one hand barely resting on the throttle while droning down the road. Saving energy is important for longer rides, and carries over to riding long days in the dirt and it's all about your balance and efficiency. Going faster makes it harder to find perfect balance since you have to learn so far forward to battle the wind.
No caffeine, small meals/ snacks throughout the day, stay hydrated, stop often if you'd like but for short times.
Wear earplugs.
It's just a string of short trips strung together, no big deal.

You can take a look here too for more advice for riding longer miles on pavement, I've been following these guidelines for years in my travels and have found the combinations that work for me.
Sour candy in your tank bag or pocket that you can get at while riding will keep you awake and alert works much better than caffeine, with no energy crashes. Never do I drink red bull or anything like that. Bad bad bad.

http://www.ironbutt.com/tech/aow.cfm

As for the bike, I'm sure there's plenty of differing views on this, but I always air up my tires when I'm going to do long pavement stretches, about 32 psi rear, 27 front. I have found that running high pressure on the pavement greatly reduces wearing on the knobs. My theory is with higher pressures there's less heat so less wearing, also helps the front wheel wear more evenly.
I also crank down my Scott's damper all the way tight, then back it off just a half turn or less in windy conditions. Helps with stability and fatigue on the road, just don't forget to loosen it up when you air down your tires going into the dirt.
I do use a Cramp Buster CB1 sometimes for long rides, it lets you relax your hand even more on the bars, saving more energy.

Little steps to stay comfortable like finding balance and shifting your weight around on the seat throughout the day, straightening you back out at times, or sticking a leg out now and then makes the difference between having an enjoyable ride or getting to the destination all wiped out and sore.

Sounds like you have your bike setup nicely to start traveling on it, the more saddle time your get, the more comfortable it will become as your body gets used to it, if you can ride as much as possible before you go, it could help make the trip more comfy, but don't waist your fresh tires!

For me, nothing is more satisfying than jumping on the road, all self contained with all I need, can't help but smile and can't wait to get back in the saddle.
For now I'll have to live vicariously through YOU and anyone else hitting the road.
Take lots of photos and let us know how it goes!

Have fun!!!

















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Old 04-25-2013, 07:28 PM   #657
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Wow, thanks Lost! As usual, you don't fell to amaze with your knowledge and experience!

I am pretty excited now that I have someone that believes it can be done. Most of my buddies scoff at riding a dirtbike that far. I will be traveling thru some pretty country so I will make sure to stop and take in the sights. Use that to break up the monotony.

Didn't think about the air pressure or ear plugs. I will try hard to stay away from the red bull, it is a crutch I need to get rid of.
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Old 04-25-2013, 08:01 PM   #658
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Glad to help!
Don't forget to tell your buddies that you're not on a dirt bike, you're on a Husaberg!

This bike is more than capable of anything us mere mortals can throw at it, but like most things it comes down to the rider and following proven methods for long distance travels on any bike makes all the difference.

Balance.

I believe you'll be pleasantly surprised at how easy it is to bang out miles once you find your balance to reduce the amount of energy needed to ride comfortably. It might take some experimenting and thought at first, but like most things it can become second nature, like using a clutch.

Good luck!


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Old 04-25-2013, 10:09 PM   #659
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Wow, thanks for sharing all that advice Lost!

I thought I'd throw out a quick recommendation on ear plugs. I've been using these, and I can't speak highly enough of them. They're much more comfortable than any type of standard foam ear plugs. You can even form it around your ear phones to make the best noise canceling ear phones I've ever used...and no, I'm not affiliated with them

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...52&postcount=1

Regardless, I would definitely agree that wearing any ear plug is a big help in reducing fatigue.
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Old 04-25-2013, 11:04 PM   #660
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Rider View Post
Glad to help!
Don't forget to tell your buddies that you're not on a dirt bike, you're on a Husaberg!

This bike is more than capable of anything us mere mortals can throw at it, but like most things it comes down to the rider and following proven methods for long distance travels on any bike makes all the difference.

Balance.

I believe you'll be pleasantly surprised at how easy it is to bang out miles once you find your balance to reduce the amount of energy needed to ride comfortably. It might take some experimenting and thought at first, but like most things it can become second nature, like using a clutch.

Good luck!


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I can vouch for what Lost says, being a member of and ridden certified rides with the Iron Butt Association for years, and done a few long rides like this one, on a Triumph Tiger not a Berg -- yet.



It is a mindset and either the long miles will drive you nuts or bore you, or you can get "in the flow", no music or distractions, no stimulants other than stay well hydrated with water (and electrolytes if it's hot), and the miles just roll by and it is enjoyable. Sounds like the latter way is how Finn does it.

The Bergs rock as a dual-sport and I think FE owners who realize what they have will keep 'em. I know I plan to.
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