ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-26-2012, 07:48 PM   #61
caryder
Gnarly Adventurer
 
caryder's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Phoenix
Oddometer: 202
I'm always annoyed by friends that have an aversion to modern dirt bikes that have everything going for them except they don't have e-start and that becomes the deal breaker. Seriously?


Chuck
__________________
Chuck
2012 Honda NC700X
2006 Gas Gas 300 Pro
2003 Kawasaki KDX220R
1976 Yamaha RD400C
caryder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2012, 10:13 PM   #62
DAKEZ
Beastly Adventurer
 
DAKEZ's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: OR
Oddometer: 19,553
Quote:
Originally Posted by IRideASlowBike View Post
Sorry Dakez, you just don't ride in 110F temps and "not break a sweat". Doesn't matter what gear you wear. At least here on the East Coast you sure don't.

It must suck to be where there is high humidity. My reference was Montana, Idaho, Dry Side of Washington and the Dry side of Oregon. Do like I stated in my earlier post and it works.

I don't think I would do well in a high humid area like Texas or any place where the humidity is high. I would guess that the high humidity would take away much of the cooling effects of evaporating that we get up here.

There is no need to apologize. I have done this many times up here and I know it works. I can accept the fact that it might not work there as I have never ridden there.

I must need more fiber in my diet or something... My bm's are brown and I feel so normal.

This is my HOT weather riding Jacket.

For reference, it is a BMG Adventure. It has a zip off hydration pack that I last used in 2008 (I prefer bottled water in my tank bag)
__________________
“Watch out for everything bigger than you, they have the "right of weight"
Bib

DAKEZ screwed with this post 04-26-2012 at 10:33 PM
DAKEZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 12:40 AM   #63
Wraith Rider
Beastly Adventurer
 
Wraith Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Germany
Oddometer: 1,137
Quote:
Originally Posted by rivercreep View Post
It's really meant to say...if you want all the comforts of a cage, drive a cage and stop whining about Bikes not having all the creature comforts of a cage or technology.
Sounds like a very stupid advice to me. I don't like driving cars for several reasons. But I really like being comfortable and I love motorcycles. So I buy and ride comfortable motorcycles.
Anyone who thinks I'm not "tough enough" to be a "real biker" in my opinion is not open minded enough to be a "real biker" himself.
__________________
"Why not stay in disguise all the time? You know, look like everyone else."
"Because we shouldn't have to."
Wraith Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 12:48 AM   #64
Tripped1
Likely Lost.
 
Tripped1's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Sandy Eggo
Oddometer: 7,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraith Rider View Post
Sounds like a very stupid advice to me. I don't like driving cars for several reasons. But I really like being comfortable and I love motorcycles. So I buy and ride comfortable motorcycles.
Anyone who thinks I'm not "tough enough" to be a "real biker" in my opinion is not open minded enough to be a "real biker" himself.
+1

I've been on both ends of that one. Did have my car registered for three years at one point because I just rode the bikes everywhere. Also if I want to be comfortable I'll just take the truck. I've been riding for 25 of my 33 years on this planet, I've little to prove to anyone.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by RottenScummyTroll View Post
Show folks something with a clutch and carburetor, and it's like teaching a baboon to use a Macbook.
Tripped1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 01:07 AM   #65
FinlandThumper
Has Cake/Eats it Too
 
FinlandThumper's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Neither here nor there
Oddometer: 6,259
I think the very idea that a hobby so general as motorcycling has a single definition of "pure" is a fiction, or that wanting your bike to be reliable and comfortable makes you somehow "less" of a rider. Usually, and this isn't a dis on the OP or anything, concepts of "purity" are usually so ill defined or subject to personal interpretation that the entire thing is bullshit.

I agree with this assessment:

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
Personally I like the modern bike's features. I like the old bikes too, but every time I buy one I remember why I like the modern ones. They usually do not handle as well, stop or go as well, and break all the time.
I remember as a child, my old man had a 1968 Triumph Bonneville bobber, metallic blue with black lace custom tank, tasteful chrome, sweet exhaust. Cool? Sure...that thing literally dripped coolness. Pure? Sure...pure hell to keep the damn thing running. I remember going up the road on the back and suddenly...nothing. No power. Blown fuse, again. Get it to the side of the road and figure out the electrical problem. And while he was at it, he'd grab his wrenches and tighten the loose bolts back up. We were "fixing" as much as we were "riding".

This is why I always laugh when some hipster in a bar says that only British bikes pre-1970 are legit (or something similar). Sure, go ahead and talk. That BSA T-shirt sure turns on the chicks, but I'd love to watch McHipster actually get one running and keep it that way.

I currently have a 2002 BMW Dakar and a 1998 Harley Davidson. Both of them "modern" bikes. Both of them start and run every time but still don't have a ton of frills. But when I want to ride, I don't want to wrench if it's not necessary. And when I ride, especially long distance, I sure as hell want to set the bike up for comfort. What, I somehow need to spend my time motorcycling in pain and on a poor-fitting bike with shitty ergo's just so I can prove to everyone that I'm a "real old skool biker"? I call bullshit!

That's why I like modern bikes. Reliable and easily modified for comfort. Especially since here in Helsinki my only ride is the Dakar; I own no car. So it's either "ride and rust or take the bus", literally.

So am I not "legit enough"? Or do I not "appreciate motorcycling" enough? Maybe, but I stopped giving a fuck about whether some other guy thinks I'm legit a LONG time ago. And while the legit guy is fixing his bike, I'll just go about racking up thousands of miles per season on my non-legit ride, appreciating every mile.
FinlandThumper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 01:15 AM   #66
FinlandThumper
Has Cake/Eats it Too
 
FinlandThumper's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Neither here nor there
Oddometer: 6,259
Quote:
Originally Posted by IRideASlowBike View Post
Sorry Dakez, you just don't ride in 110F temps and "not break a sweat". Doesn't matter what gear you wear. At least here on the East Coast you sure don't. The only situation where you'd be "dry" was is if you weren't wearing any gear at all, and the sweat was simply evaporating off you faster than you could replenish it. But then you wouldn't last long before heatstroke and dehydration set in.
Summer of 2010 I rode from Madison WI via North Carolina to Miami, and then back up through the deep south and the river road to home. My God it was muggy. The entire trip was spent hot.

The Harley was (obviously) air cooled and I had only a leather jacket. I keep minimal gear in the states and I can't afford full sets of both. So I have good cycle pants and a jacket, and then rain shell type gear. I remember riding through Montogomery AL at 105 degrees in 15mph traffic. Just pure, hot, hell. Heat pouring off the engine onto my legs, sun literally pressing me down into the seat. Sweat just pouring down across my face; full face helmet with vents wide open, but they don't do much good at low speed. I stopped and drank gatorade at every stop. Wetted my shirt and stayed cool. It was a great ride! But damn. That was hot, especially when you're used to temperatures near the arctic circle.
FinlandThumper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 01:19 AM   #67
fallingoff
Banned
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: syd oz
Oddometer: 3,677
bikes when i started riding
bad tyres/ modern radial tyres
kick start/ electric start that works
small suspension travel/ good suspension travel
pogo or hard suspension/ suspension works
bad brakes, no brakes in wet/ brakes that work all the time
no abs/ abs
carbs/ fuel injection
constant chain adjustment/ o ring chains etc
lucas prince of darkness, poor headlights/ head lights that work
bad electrics especially in wet/ electrics that work
points/ ei
expensive to buy / cheaper per avg income
little info/internet etc for info- e bay etc
wet maps/ gps
bad helmets/ good- cheaper-visors etc
expensive-little ppe/ great cheap ppe
i could go on and on
you get the message
loved riding then/ still love it
two wheels/still two wheels
music-talk to other riders on bike fantastic
less hassle
got hassled riding on and off road/ still do
excuse the spelling

just my humble opinion and experiance

cheers

ps hi old pete and dakez
fallingoff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 02:03 AM   #68
rivercreep OP
Banned
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: S.E. Pennsylvania (Reading)
Oddometer: 3,243
Quote:
Originally Posted by perterra View Post
Yeah yeah, two up and you enjoyed it. I dont, and see no reason to do so.
Nope! I have no reason to make shit up.

My first real bike was a 91 DR650 and from that I went to a 97 and then a 2009 (with different bikes along side of them). I simply grew up with DR's and feel I logged soooo many miles on the damn things that I grew into the shape of the seats so that they never posed any real issues for me.
I never felt the need to change out one of their seats but, I did always wear cycling shorts with the ass padding and that helped greatly. (I never whined about it...just found a solution that made it livable)
rivercreep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 04:55 AM   #69
phoenixdoglover
Where to next?
 
phoenixdoglover's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Muscat, Sultanate of Oman
Oddometer: 111
Motorcycles for Old Farts with Money

In the past 20 years, the proportion of motorcycle riders over 50 years old has doubled and is now about 50%. (You can learn some interesting things at the NHTSA web site).

Older people have more money than younger people.

So, if you want to understand why motorcycles are now configured the way they are, just consider who is doing the buying, and especially who is buying the more expensive bikes.

People like me. I'm 58 years old and the kids are finished with college. Hey, what happened to my life's savings!

Anyway, I sure do appreciate electric start, as a life of computer work has left me with chicken legs. And my boney butt feels much better in a good seat. I don't want my scrawny neck twisted by the wind, so a windshield is necessary. And without a GPS, I might get lost. Could be early onset senile dementia. Somebody mentioned heated hand grips. If I lived someplace cold I might get those too.

It sucks getting old, but the suffering can be minimized.
__________________
2009 KLR650
2009 Suzuki C50T
2011 Moto Guzzi Stelvio NTX
phoenixdoglover is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 06:06 AM   #70
NJ-Brett
Brett
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Southern New Jersey
Oddometer: 6,293
I was dual sporting a 1969 Triumph Daytona for 5 years and 45,000 miles, and got towed home once when some aftermarket valve adjusters came apart, non standard parts....

Yes, it was a bit of work keeping it trouble free, as the 500's vibrate like mad at high rpm's where they make power, and the trans had some issues, both were not problems on the 650's.

And all it took was a bit of attention to the bike to prevent electrical problems, I never had electrical problems with any of my Triumphs.

I rode a well used Bonneville 9000 miles around the US and only had a flat front tire.
Friends with Harleys had the cdi crap out, flat tires, and the carb fall off from time to time.
50,000 miles of abuse on that bike and I never had to push it or get towed.

I thought it was a better bike then the modern Bonneville which is over weight, under powered, and wobbles in turns, along with having a crap seat and soft shocks.
If they made a new old Bonneville, I would be all over it.
I think the w650 came closer to the old bikes then Triumph did.







Quote:
Originally Posted by FinlandThumper View Post
I think the very idea that a hobby so general as motorcycling has a single definition of "pure" is a fiction, or that wanting your bike to be reliable and comfortable makes you somehow "less" of a rider. Usually, and this isn't a dis on the OP or anything, concepts of "purity" are usually so ill defined or subject to personal interpretation that the entire thing is bullshit.

I agree with this assessment:



I remember as a child, my old man had a 1968 Triumph Bonneville bobber, metallic blue with black lace custom tank, tasteful chrome, sweet exhaust. Cool? Sure...that thing literally dripped coolness. Pure? Sure...pure hell to keep the damn thing running. I remember going up the road on the back and suddenly...nothing. No power. Blown fuse, again. Get it to the side of the road and figure out the electrical problem. And while he was at it, he'd grab his wrenches and tighten the loose bolts back up. We were "fixing" as much as we were "riding".

This is why I always laugh when some hipster in a bar says that only British bikes pre-1970 are legit (or something similar). Sure, go ahead and talk. That BSA T-shirt sure turns on the chicks, but I'd love to watch McHipster actually get one running and keep it that way.

I currently have a 2002 BMW Dakar and a 1998 Harley Davidson. Both of them "modern" bikes. Both of them start and run every time but still don't have a ton of frills. But when I want to ride, I don't want to wrench if it's not necessary. And when I ride, especially long distance, I sure as hell want to set the bike up for comfort. What, I somehow need to spend my time motorcycling in pain and on a poor-fitting bike with shitty ergo's just so I can prove to everyone that I'm a "real old skool biker"? I call bullshit!

That's why I like modern bikes. Reliable and easily modified for comfort. Especially since here in Helsinki my only ride is the Dakar; I own no car. So it's either "ride and rust or take the bus", literally.

So am I not "legit enough"? Or do I not "appreciate motorcycling" enough? Maybe, but I stopped giving a fuck about whether some other guy thinks I'm legit a LONG time ago. And while the legit guy is fixing his bike, I'll just go about racking up thousands of miles per season on my non-legit ride, appreciating every mile.
NJ-Brett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 08:22 AM   #71
klaviator
Beastly Adventurer
 
klaviator's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Huntsville, AL
Oddometer: 5,618
Who's "WE"???

I've been in love with motorcycles and riding since I got my first bike over 30 years ago and I never stopped appreciating them.

__________________
I ride, Therefore I Am.



klaviator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 08:27 AM   #72
Namecheck
Like a Sir!
 
Namecheck's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Omaha, NE
Oddometer: 114
Here's to you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by FinlandThumper View Post
I think the very idea that a hobby so general as motorcycling has a single definition of "pure" is a fiction, or that wanting your bike to be reliable and comfortable makes you somehow "less" of a rider. Usually, and this isn't a dis on the OP or anything, concepts of "purity" are usually so ill defined or subject to personal interpretation that the entire thing is bullshit.

I agree with this assessment:



I remember as a child, my old man had a 1968 Triumph Bonneville bobber, metallic blue with black lace custom tank, tasteful chrome, sweet exhaust. Cool? Sure...that thing literally dripped coolness. Pure? Sure...pure hell to keep the damn thing running. I remember going up the road on the back and suddenly...nothing. No power. Blown fuse, again. Get it to the side of the road and figure out the electrical problem. And while he was at it, he'd grab his wrenches and tighten the loose bolts back up. We were "fixing" as much as we were "riding".

This is why I always laugh when some hipster in a bar says that only British bikes pre-1970 are legit (or something similar). Sure, go ahead and talk. That BSA T-shirt sure turns on the chicks, but I'd love to watch McHipster actually get one running and keep it that way.

I currently have a 2002 BMW Dakar and a 1998 Harley Davidson. Both of them "modern" bikes. Both of them start and run every time but still don't have a ton of frills. But when I want to ride, I don't want to wrench if it's not necessary. And when I ride, especially long distance, I sure as hell want to set the bike up for comfort. What, I somehow need to spend my time motorcycling in pain and on a poor-fitting bike with shitty ergo's just so I can prove to everyone that I'm a "real old skool biker"? I call bullshit!

That's why I like modern bikes. Reliable and easily modified for comfort. Especially since here in Helsinki my only ride is the Dakar; I own no car. So it's either "ride and rust or take the bus", literally.

So am I not "legit enough"? Or do I not "appreciate motorcycling" enough? Maybe, but I stopped giving a fuck about whether some other guy thinks I'm legit a LONG time ago. And while the legit guy is fixing his bike, I'll just go about racking up thousands of miles per season on my non-legit ride, appreciating every mile.

Here's to not giving a fuck!
Namecheck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 09:45 AM   #73
ezrdr55
Gnarly Adventurer
 
ezrdr55's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: St. Louis, MO
Oddometer: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by rivercreep View Post
When did I stop appreciating... motorcycling for what it is?
Fixed it. Only you can answer that.
__________________
Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are mine, and do not represent that of any other humanoid past, present or future on this or any other planet.
'95 H-D FXDWG '06 Honda CRF250X '04 KTM 450EXC '97 Honda XR-600R '04K1200LT(SOLD) '07 K1200GT (SOLD) '09 Wee-Strom DL-650ABS '14WR250R
ezrdr55 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 05:01 PM   #74
Nevada
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Somehwere in the Utah Valley
Oddometer: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Keep playing the fool and wearing your mesh in 100+ temps. It's no sweat off my back.
uh, not "fool". It's a matter of being acclimated, and personal tolerances for different conditions. I can easily do hours in the saddle, triple digit temps wearing mesh gear, in my "native" riding environment. Over 80 I want mesh. Oh, and yes, I do hydrate. The same time wearing non-mesh gear is absolutely miserable for me above 85.

And that's riding out on the open road. Commuting in Las Vegas, in the summer, in non-mesh gear borders on dangerous.

Now, if someone from the PNW heads down through the Mojave Desert in July, for them it's going to be a trade off. They are less likely to have any real awareness of their hydration needs, so stewing in their juices may be safer for them than otherwise.
Nevada is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 06:25 PM   #75
NJ-Brett
Brett
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Southern New Jersey
Oddometer: 6,293
I crossed the Mojave in late July, during the daytime, it was 126F in the shade.
I wore jeans and a T shirt. Like riding in a blast furnace.

The old Triumph did great, lots of overheated cars though...
I did 60 mph, cars were blowing by me with the AC on, then were on the side of the road 20 miles up with smoke pouring out from under the hood...
NJ-Brett is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014