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Old 05-24-2012, 12:51 PM   #31
hardpackrider
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Diabetic riding buddy.

hi all, great thread.

Say, my riding pal is a diabetic, he's on on-body insulin pump, and has had it for forty years, so he's totally self sufficient. But i was soliciting information from fellow riders who have a similar situation with a riding partner. My wife's an RN, so have watched her take care of a diabetic who had a seizure and use a lolly pop inside his mouth, moving it around to quickly get sugar into the blood stream... helped bring him around. She always carries them in her purse. Uhm, okay I know where I'm posting stuff about lolly pops in the mouth, but if we can move past those low hanging fruit porno comments ;-) (look at the pot calling the kettle black !)...and to the question of if you ride with a Diabetic riding buddy, what precautions would make sense for me to be aware of.

I've copied all the above posts into a doc, and will be shopping / adding to the pretty nice start of a kit:

http://www.touratech-usa.com/Store/1...ar-to-070-0932

(but definately lacking some of the specific great suggestions from you-all)

thanks for any "friend of a diabetic" advice.

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Old 05-24-2012, 02:53 PM   #32
Casejeep
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hardpackrider View Post
hi all, great thread.

Say, my riding pal is a diabetic, he's on on-body insulin pump, and has had it for forty years, so he's totally self sufficient. But i was soliciting information from fellow riders who have a similar situation with a riding partner. My wife's an RN, so have watched her take care of a diabetic who had a seizure and use a lolly pop inside his mouth, moving it around to quickly get sugar into the blood stream... helped bring him around. She always carries them in her purse. Uhm, okay I know where I'm posting stuff about lolly pops in the mouth, but if we can move past those low hanging fruit porno comments ;-) (look at the pot calling the kettle black !)...and to the question of if you ride with a Diabetic riding buddy, what precautions would make sense for me to be aware of.

I've copied all the above posts into a doc, and will be shopping / adding to the pretty nice start of a kit:

http://www.touratech-usa.com/Store/1...ar-to-070-0932

(but definately lacking some of the specific great suggestions from you-all)

thanks for any "friend of a diabetic" advice.


Well if your friend has had it for 40+ years I wouldn't worry about it. I like to use cake decorating gel. Don't have to worry about them choking on it like a lolly pop.

Ask him where he keeps his glucose meter and know how to use it.
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Old 05-24-2012, 03:52 PM   #33
yellowbirdrs
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mine
2 Sun Screen packets
1 Latex-Free gloves
3 First Aid Burn Cream Packets
3 Cleansing Towelettes
3 Triple antibiotic packets
3 Insect Sting Pads
3 Hand sanitizer packets
2 Lens cleaning cloths
1 Eyewash, 20ml
1 Ear Plugs, Pair
3 4x4 Gauze Pads
1 Tweezer/Magnifier
3 Extra-Large Strips
1 Survival wrap
10 3/4x3 strips, plastic
1 Rain poncho
2 Knuckle strips
1 Elastic bandage, 2"
2 Fingertip strips
1 Scratch Paper / Card
1 Gauze roll 3 x4.1yd
1 Golf Pencil
1 Gauze roll 2 x4.1yd
1 Quick First Aid Guide
1 Waterproof Tape in shell, 1/2"x5yd shell
1 Content Card
1 Triangle bandage
1 Emergency Contact Card

from Max BMW First Aid Kit for $29 also I add to the kit

1 scorpion kit
1 snake bite kit
2 oral rehydration mix
1 new skin
1 EDC Trauma Kit
3 powerbar gel (glucose mix)
1 $100 dlls bill
1 mini credit card
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Old 05-24-2012, 09:57 PM   #34
C-Stain
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Casejeep View Post
Well if your friend has had it for 40+ years I wouldn't worry about it. I like to use cake decorating gel. Don't have to worry about them choking on it like a lolly pop.

Ask him where he keeps his glucose meter and know how to use it.
+1

I've been diabetic since I was 13. I always ride with a Glucometer, snacks, juice and oral glucose. (My kid likes to raid my tank bag because that's where the best goodies are). I make sure that the folks I'm riding with understand that if I'm acting like I'm drunk or I'm not quite right, get me to check my sugars and eat. I manage very well, but at times will ignore my warning signs because I'm hyper-focused on something else. You should NEVER put something in an unconscious diabetic's mouth.
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Old 05-24-2012, 11:10 PM   #35
PeterW
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Mylar 'space bag' is useful to have.

Not just for first aid, if you get stranded at night it makes holing up until dawn look at lot better an option as well.

Shock is generally a problem if there's any decent sort of crash, and having something there that'll keep the body heat in can be a big help.

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Old 05-25-2012, 12:40 AM   #36
SnowMule
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterW View Post
Mylar 'space bag' is useful to have.

Not just for first aid, if you get stranded at night it makes holing up until dawn look at lot better an option as well.

Shock is generally a problem if there's any decent sort of crash, and having something there that'll keep the body heat in can be a big help.

Pete
+1. Not so much in the summer on motos, but I've got one in my snowmobiling pack.

Moto pack, I've got a few black plastic trash bags. Makeshift poncho, rain shelter, or use it to pick up parts after a wreck... hundreds of uses, packs down tiny at the bottom of the camelbak pocket.
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Old 06-01-2012, 03:36 PM   #37
Storm Shadow
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at what point do you think i have too much weight for what ifs?

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Old 06-01-2012, 06:34 PM   #38
GeckoRider
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Just a quick note, and probably folks with bad allergic reactions know this, but if you find you have a new allergy this might help you. Example or think of inhaling the smoke from a plant that you did not know you were allergic too, Even if you have an Epi pen, or other medication these are ONLY to hopefully stop the problem for the MOMENT. Even if you have had bad reactions in the past and "fixed" them with one dose, this time it may be worse. The time you have bought yourself should be used to seek proper medical treatment ASAP.

A reaction that causes your eyes to swell, or any of the membranes in your nose, mouth, throat to be swollen/painful is a very serious sign as you could quickly loose you ability to breath. Get moving! Don't pack, someone can come back for it. Go go go.
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Old 06-02-2012, 09:58 AM   #39
CafeRacer99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike at Tank Vest View Post
I'm seriously thinking of taking the information from this thread and designing a first aid kit system for motorcycle riders and offering it as an accessory to the tank vest.
This kit would fit your tank vest: http://www.uscav.com/productinfo.asp...=17715&tabid=1

It's what we are issued in Afghanistan. Although we added EMT shears, quik clots and Israeli bandages.
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:32 PM   #40
nikonll
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How important is it for the Kit to be waterproof??
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:16 AM   #41
bomber60015
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For me (can't speak for others), Very Important.

Ever tried to use soaked first aid supplies?

I don't want to, every again.
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Old 06-13-2012, 08:28 AM   #42
t6pilot
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One thing I added to my kit is a bottle of cayenne pepper, this is a old Indian remedy for stopping blood flow on scrapes
I know your first thought is it's going to sting, it doesn't, I have used it several times on myself mountain biking
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Old 06-13-2012, 04:30 PM   #43
proileri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CafeRacer99 View Post
This kit would fit your tank vest: http://www.uscav.com/productinfo.asp...=17715&tabid=1

It's what we are issued in Afghanistan. Although we added EMT shears, quik clots and Israeli bandages.
That's a pretty good setup.

I got some medic training in the army, and I've since carried a separate, "real" first aid kit - the kit to stop a person from getting into seriously bad condition or dying within the next 30 minutes or so, until EMTs get there or you get to them.

In my opinion, what the kit should include is:
1) Things that enable CPR and putting your hands into another persons mouth, guts, etc. - nowadays you just need disposable gloves.
2) Things that allow you to stop heavy bleeding - field bandages (israelis are practical, including the pre-plastic clasp ones that are cheap), EMT shears, a tourniquet or two.
3) Anything to help to keep the person warm, like a space blanket. Even during the summer, the night temps can be cool, especially if the ground is wet and the person is immobile.

Plus a roll of duct tape, which is practical everywhere. After that it's quik-clot, chest seals etc. I'd personally rather keep multiple small basic kits around than invest in a big one with expensive equipment.

Also, anything that can be used to improvise can be highly practical. At minimum I'd have a knife and a small axe/saw around, plus something to fasten things with (duct tape, thin wire, zip-ties). These allow you to make splints, bandages and stretchers as needed.

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Old 06-13-2012, 09:57 PM   #44
team ftb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hardpackrider View Post
hi all, great thread.

Say, my riding pal is a diabetic, he's on on-body insulin pump, and has had it for forty years, so he's totally self sufficient. But i was soliciting information from fellow riders who have a similar situation with a riding partner. My wife's an RN, so have watched her take care of a diabetic who had a seizure and use a lolly pop inside his mouth, moving it around to quickly get sugar into the blood stream... helped bring him around. She always carries them in her purse. Uhm, okay I know where I'm posting stuff about lolly pops in the mouth, but if we can move past those low hanging fruit porno comments ;-) (look at the pot calling the kettle black !)...and to the question of if you ride with a Diabetic riding buddy, what precautions would make sense for me to be aware of.

thanks for any "friend of a diabetic" advice.

Great question. I'm an insulin dependent diabetic (type 1) and been dealing with it for 32 years and trying to care for my diabetes in the rural jungles of southeast asia during my rides. Most doctors years ago tried to dissuade me from scuba diving, rock climbing etc due to the dangers of low blood sugars and the consequences of it during those activities. Instead I viewed it as a variable that needed to be adapted. Diabetes challenge is managing the blood glucose levels. You neither want the levels too high or too low. When the blood sugar levels are too high, the diabetic has enough cerebral acumen present to take actions and self regulate the sugars. The danger is low blood sugars in diabetics, when in this case the mental capabilities of the diabetic can be compromised and therefore the diabetic is unable to competently take actions to reverse the low blood sugars. Symptoms of a low blood sugar are drunken like behavior, inability to comprehend and process information correctly, erratic behavior, blah blah blah. This is where friends are a huge asset to the diabetic as they can assist the diabetic in getting the blood sugar increased. This is done usually by taking on glucose to get the blood sugar to increase quickly and carbohydrates to keep it elevated.

People mention testing the blood sugar with the diabetics blood glucose meter. In my experience the meter is not even needed as by the time friends recognize a low blood sugar in my actions I'm definitely have a low blood sugar and not borderline low. In this case just get the damn glucose into my mouth. The diabetic has sugar somewhere on their person or in the pack. Ideally the quickest way to increase the blood sugar is intravenously with a glucose drip but this ain't gonna be available on the side of the trail. Next quickest would be a liquid with glucose since it does not have to be broken down from a solid; cola, fruit juice, Gatorade, etc. Third would be solids with glucose (candy, cookies, etc). Another great option are things like Powerbal Gels that can be slowly dribbled into the diabetics mouth without choking even if they are incoherent. The cake icing in a tube mentioned by Casejeep is perfect as it is a durable package and holds about 8 oz of the stuff. I used to use this in my scuba diving equipment as I could take the regulator out of my mouth 100 feet down and suck on some cake icing if i was feeling the blood sugar dropping too much.

People ask about proper glucose dosaging in these emergency situations when the diabetic is incoherent. In my eyes don't worry about giving them too much. If you give them too much then when they come around and are out of the woods they can then self regulate themselves. In other words one lollipop may not cut it and you may need six, depending on how low the blood sugar has gotten. It is better to give the diabetic too much sugar than too little sugar in this case.

Sometimes the diabetic may tell you they are fine (I do this I'm told) even though you can see for yourself that something is amiss with their actions. In these situations you are a better judge of what is going on than the diabetic and need to get some sugar into the diabetic even though they may insist that they do not need it. It may need some persistence on the part of the friends.


Best of luck.
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Old 06-14-2012, 05:24 AM   #45
proileri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by team ftb View Post

People mention testing the blood sugar with the diabetics blood glucose meter. In my experience the meter is not even needed as by the time friends recognize a low blood sugar in my actions I'm definitely have a low blood sugar and not borderline low. In this case just get the damn glucose into my mouth.
I'm considering buying some of those individually packaged glucose candy thingies for my first aid kit, and for myself too. I don't have diabetes, but exercise sometimes drops my blood sugar low. It's definitely unpleasant.
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