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Old 05-29-2012, 03:33 AM   #31
'05Train
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Quote:
Originally Posted by portablejohn View Post
Two fingers over the front brake. Roll on the throttle as you release the clutch and let go of the front brake lever. Remind me again why you would need the rear brake or to be shifting into second gear while you do this?
I'd be happy to. A pedestrian walks in front of you while you're making a right hand turn from a stop, and you need to stop quickly to avoid hitting him. Grab the front brake, and you're going down. Stomp on the rear and you're fine.
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Old 05-29-2012, 03:41 AM   #32
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Stopping in Balance

Quote:
Originally Posted by '05Train View Post
I'd be happy to. A pedestrian walks in front of you while you're making a right hand turn from a stop, and you need to stop quickly to avoid hitting him. Grab the front brake, and you're going down. Stomp on the rear and you're fine.

I saw the scenario you described two weeks ago while riding through Monterey, VA. You are correct, '05Train, again.

Mike
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Old 05-29-2012, 05:28 AM   #33
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I strongly believe it is what several others have said, EYES UP.
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Old 05-29-2012, 06:27 AM   #34
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Old 05-29-2012, 11:50 AM   #35
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lots of good advice here, keep your feet on the foot pegs as much as you can, resist the impulse of dragging your feet or attempting to walk along while your bike is still moving, it only make you more unstable and don't hesitate to use the handle bars all the way to steer at very low speeds.
Rear brake + clutch are your allies
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Old 05-29-2012, 02:36 PM   #36
trc.rhubarb
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This bike is silly light compared to a big tourer :)

Pedestrian example is just one of many with why you want rear brake covered vs front...

Most it's habit. I've never been a foot dragger but I have seen a broken foot from doing so. I can't take off without my feet on the pegs... at least one of them. So for me, it takes longer to pull away when I have 2 feet on the ground. Oh... and then there is the fact that I can only get one foot on the ground! Toes really.
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Old 05-29-2012, 03:29 PM   #37
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+1

It took me a long time and more than a few drops to learn this.

of course, i'm also a stubborn SOB and some times it was just my yelling "I'm not going to drop this F$%^&^g thing!", to keep it upright.

YMMV


Quote:
Originally Posted by Boon Booni View Post
Countersteer.

Balance yourself to nearly stopped, and the last movement with the bars should be slight turn away from the foot you want on the ground.

To get your left foot on the ground, slight turn to the right (just as the wheels are about to stop) to get the bike leaning oh so slightly to the left so it won't fall to the right.


All this talk about rear brake instead of front is good for low speed maneuvering, but you should be able to stop in a strait line with either brake and end up gently on either foot.
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Old 05-29-2012, 04:27 PM   #38
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Again, Thanks for all the good, helpful suggestions. I believe I have plenty to work on this coming weekend. I appreciate the time everyone has taken to respond to my question.

Steve
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Old 05-29-2012, 04:32 PM   #39
tagesk
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When I draw to a halt, I put down my right foot (not my left).

For two reasons.
First and foremost: I am stronger in my right leg.
If I need to prevent it from falling, I prefer to use my right leg.

Second, after I have came to rest, I use my left to put the bike into neutral.
I need the left on the peg to put it in gear when I want to go.
Or, if you like: I am not holding the clutch when I am waiting for things to happen (light to turn green, for example).

I don't subscribe to the "keep it in gear in order to make a quick escape"-idea.
When the light changes to green, it takes me a fraction of a second to pull in the clutch, put it in gear, and pull away.

Relating to your question: I take great care in not looking down, but at the horizon or the building in front of me in order to see any change in "orientation" long befoor I can feel it (at which point it is usually too late).

[TaSK]
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Old 05-29-2012, 04:50 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tagesk View Post
I don't subscribe to the "keep it in gear in order to make a quick escape"-idea.
When the light changes to green, it takes me a fraction of a second to pull in the clutch, put it in gear, and pull away. [TaSK]
The quick escape is not when the light turns green but when some stupid cager doesn't see you and you realize (probably too late to shift into gear) that he's about to rear end you. If you have to pull in the clutch and put the bike in gear, you've lost precious time to get out of the way. Now if there are a couple of cars stopped behind you, you're probably fine.
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Old 05-29-2012, 04:57 PM   #41
Callisto224
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Take a Basic Rider Course

Take a Basic Rider Course. They spend a lot of time teaching you how to stop correctly. Even if you've been riding for years the class will help you. Also, like many have said, do not use your front brake as you complete your stop. If the front wheel is turned at all, you will fall over.

But again, take a Basic Rider Course. There is so much that you learn in a class setting that you will never learn reading here! And yes I'm 52 and I've taking the Basic Rider Course, the Advanced Rider Course (3 times) and a couple of other classes. It makes a HUGE difference. Teaching yourself only enforces your bad habits.
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Old 05-29-2012, 11:15 PM   #42
tagesk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto224 View Post
The quick escape is not when the light turns green but when some stupid cager doesn't see you and you realize (probably too late to shift into gear) that he's about to rear end you. If you have to pull in the clutch and put the bike in gear, you've lost precious time to get out of the way. Now if there are a couple of cars stopped behind you, you're probably fine.
Over Here, we pass the line of cars and draw to a halt in front of the line.
Thus, in 99% of all cases, I have cars behind me when I wait for a light.

In any case, also in stop and go traffic, if I have to wait more than, say, 15 seconds, I drop it in neutral and wait calmly with my right foot on the ground.

[TaS;K]
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Old 05-31-2012, 07:42 AM   #43
Keithwildi
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How are your tires? Just swapped out to new tires after wearing my originals square due to long-haul highway driving. For whatever reason, it is MUCH easier to balance on the new tread. Just an idea
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Old 05-31-2012, 08:10 AM   #44
Vitruvian Mike
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For riding on the street ...

+1

For riding on dirt roads try different things, and note what works for you. If you drop it, no big deal. Most of us have dropped our rigs many times over many years. Try to get your drops in on dirt roads.

For riding offroad (not on dirt roads, more like trails), you can improvise, getting used to off camber terrain, using logs and rocks as stopping foot props, etc.

The advice about a mountain bike is fantastic advice. A keen central balance on a mountain bike pays tremendous dividends on motorcycles!

You're riding one of the funnest bikes around, but it is also pretty top heavy. You might consider picking up a smaller bike to play around on in the dirt. You'll also find that doing this will pay other huge dividends when riding your adventure bike, such as how you deal with sudden obstacles in the road, braking, turning, accelerating, body position, etc.

As about a dozen others have said, practice is your best friend!

Cheers,
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Quote:
Originally Posted by portablejohn View Post
Also note where you are stopping in your lane. The very center of the lane is often higher than where the car/truck tires roll. Often not by much, but if your bike is on the high spot, and your foot is trying to reach the bottom of the low spot, the difference can be larger that you would want. Which track you ride depends on the conditions, but the center of the lane might not be the best choice. If nothing else (beside being higher) is that it might also be very slippery from the oil/antifreeze/water that drips from other vehicles.
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Old 05-31-2012, 05:31 PM   #45
Callisto224
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tagesk View Post
Over Here, we pass the line of cars and draw to a halt in front of the line.
Thus, in 99% of all cases, I have cars behind me when I wait for a light. [TaS;K]
I love that idea! Wish we could do that here.
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