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Old 06-17-2012, 12:44 AM   #751
windmill
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Meh.

Some people just don't know when to stop. .
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Old 06-17-2012, 01:12 AM   #752
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Originally Posted by windmill View Post
Meh.

Some people just don't know when to stop. .
Same horse Hoss, you're just beating the other end.
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Old 06-17-2012, 01:19 AM   #753
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Originally Posted by IsAnOzzie View Post
Same horse Hoss, you're just beating the other end.
I'm referring to the bickering on a personal level, not the on topic subjects.


Just curious, what engine bearings weren't SKF other then the unique big end bearings?
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Old 06-17-2012, 02:26 AM   #754
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Originally Posted by Mr. Cob View Post
Howdy All,

There really is no excuse for this type of failure, something must have changed in the way the rear swing-arm assembly is being produced. Until very recently this type of failure was unheard of on a Ural, this is the third one that I know of over the last three years of production. Assuming that over the last three years well over 2,000 Ural's have been produced having at least three known failures of this type amounts to 0.0015% of the Ural's rolling off the production line with this type of failure. That's a VERY LOW percentage of failure UNLESS it happens to YOU especially in the middle of nowhere. Still I hope this will be investigated and changes made to resolve the problem.
Well, apparently the last vestige of Ural reliability has gone down the crapper, too. They can't really blame this one on anyone else...
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Old 06-17-2012, 02:42 AM   #755
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Originally Posted by gspell68 View Post
Well, apparently the last vestige of Ural reliability has gone down the crapper, too. They can't really blame this one on anyone else...

Reckon ya odds would be better with a bm' ?




First thing to go off the K1100 . Some break , some don't .
K100 mono's don't so on it went .




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Old 06-17-2012, 02:43 AM   #756
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Originally Posted by windmill View Post
I'm referring to the bickering on a personal level, not the on topic subjects.


Just curious, what engine bearings weren't SKF other then the unique big end bearings?
Every bearing the mechanic replaced, what came out was russian.
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Old 06-17-2012, 03:00 AM   #757
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Originally Posted by FR700 View Post
Reckon ya odds would be better with a bm' ?




First thing to go off the K1100 . Some break , some don't .
K100 mono's don't so on it went .




.
Until a few years ago, Ural & Dnepr frames were generally regarded as indestructible unless you took a blow torch to 'em...
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Old 06-17-2012, 03:54 AM   #758
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I have searched some to see where SKF bearings are said to be used, but I didn't find anything specific listing what bearings are used where.

This list was posted last year.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Norms 427 View Post
Railbender, that's a good link but let me offer this as a little easier one to read. As many have stated, major improvements from 2007 on make those models the ones to get. BTW, sometimes a change is indicated to have occurred in a given year but Ural doesn't always wait till a new model to implement it so some of these changes occur earlier or later than the specific year listed below.


2003 Improvements
1. Brembo disc brake on front wheel (mid year update)
2. IMWA 750 cc engine (different valves, camshaft, pistons)

2004 Improvements
1. Denso alternator
2. Type IV ignition (outside location, two-piece rotor)
3. Improved 2 WD engagement lever (with fixing plate)

2005 Improvements
1. Front bumper for Patrol
2. New bench seats
3. New wire harness with power outlet in the sidecar

2006 Improvements
Engine
1. Hex head fastening screws
2. Weather proof air cleaning system
3. Simplified exhaust system
4. New header fastening system for exhaust pipes
5. New ignition system (Starting January production*)
6. Improved quality breather pipe
Gearbox
1. Neutral light cut off for reverse
2. Hex head fastening screws
3. Improved clutch slider
4. Improved speedometer cable seal
5. Extended drive shaft splines
Final drive
1. Use of final drive lock nuts
2. Knob style dipstick removable by hand
3. Nylock nuts used to secure final drive to swing arm*
4. Labeled final drive engagement lever
Motorcycle
1. Capped steering headlock
2. Mounting of vacuum fuel valve without adapter (Starting January production)
3. New wire harness (Tourist, Patrol, Troyka, Gear Up)
4. Sidecar fuse block with power outlet
5. Floating disc for front disc brake (Troyka and Retro)
6. Improved sidecar brake plate
7. Improved rear brake pedal
8. Strengthened turn signal mount
9. Mechanically operated rear and sidecar wheel brakes (Retro)
10. Foot pedal on central stand (Retro)
*Early release 2006 models will come with improved “Type 5” Ignition.
January 06 production and on will come with Ducati Ignition system.

2007 Improvements
Engine
1. Herzog precision cut timing gears
2. NAK seals
3. High quality 8.8 hardware used throughout
4. New aluminum starter cover
5. Surfaced clutch plates for smooth operation
Gearbox
1. Herzog shafts and precision cut gears
2. NAK seals
3. High quality 8.8 hardware used throughout
Final Drive
1. Reversed style drive shaft with larger spline surface area
2. Improved 2WD engagement rod with UNI balls
Chassis
1. Improved front sidecar mount to allow more adjustment and negative camber
2. Reinforced front brake reaction link
3. Brembo floating disc on all models
4. New brake hose routing with retaining clips
5. Improved sidecar truck hinges and handle
6. Universal spare wheel holder
7. Standard handle bar size and removable risers
8. Cable trunk lid limiter strap
9. Bottom out travel limiter on sidecar swing arm
10. New US license plate mount
11. High quality 8.8 hardware used throughout
Carburetion
1. Mikuni rubber intake flanges
2. Petcock directly mounted without the use of adaptors
3. Quality fuel line
Electrical
1. Ducati ignition system
2. Italian horn
Accessories
1. Improved fuel can holder
2. Reusable touch-up paint containers
3. New shovel cover
4. Dual purpose grips for Gear-up models
4. Removable sidecar interior panels attached with 3M Velcro
5. New Name plate emblems for all models
6. New more complete tool kit, including a new bag

2008 Improvements
Engine
1. Complete new valve train including: 7 mm valve stems, sealed valve guides, hardened valve seats, and stiffer valve springs. Testing at the factory has shown great results with this new valve train, valve performance is much more accurate at high RPMs and the heavier springs allow less valve floating. With the addition of precision valve guides and seals we expect less oil consumption and wear.
2. Modified Denso adapter with updated seal position prolonging the life of the seal.
3. New clutch springs (Italy) that are stiffer providing smoother clutch engagement and prolonged clutch life. These springs also provide more consistent clutch action in off-road conditions.**
Chassis
1. Shock absorbers from Sachs (Italy) with better dampening and stiffer springs.*
2. Pivot bearings installed in place of bushings in both front and rear swing arms allowing smoother range of movement, more precise handling and suspension action.
3. Tapered steering head bearings (SKF) that last longer with less need for adjustment and/or replacement.
4. Steel braided brake hoses on all models increase braking power and feel at the lever
5. Improved bench seat has softer foam that is more comfortable.
Other
1. New tool kit (Italy) that is more complete and better quality.

2009 Improvements
1. Stainless steel exhaust pipes and mufflers
2. Removable plate under the driver seat
3. Powder painted body parts on some models
4. Standard greasable u-joints for 2 wd shaft (GMB)
5. Unified EU/US wire harness


2010 Improvements
Engine
1. Rocker arms with needle bearings. The new rocker arms use needle bearings – the design similar to most modern bikes. This reduces friction between rocker arm and rocker arm shaft improving valve train efficiency and longevity. This also increases horsepower and fuel economy.
2. Centering bushing between cylinder and cylinder head. 2010 heads utilize an improved alignment bushing to help center the cylinder and the head. This will increase longevity of the push rods.
3. Camshaft with rear needle bearing. The standard rear brass bushing has been replaced with a new needle bearing. Reduced friction increases horsepower 
and fuel economy while providing better performance at higher RPM.
4. Machined (smoothed) intake and exhaust ports of the cylinder head. By flowing the intake and exhaust ports the heads can more efficiently move fuel at higher RPM’s and increased horsepower.
5. Redesigned alternator adapter. The new design of the alternator adaptor provides better oiling to the seal preventing premature failure while also preventing bearings from overheating and failing.
Transmission
1. New polymer material instead of rubber for flexible U-joint. The strength and durability of the coupler is increased due to using new polymers in place of the 
original rubber. The new coupler is 40% stronger and can sustain heavy loads with minimum distortion.
2. Sidecar frame 
Flexible front prop (same as rear prop) – offers more options for sidecar alignment. You now have the ability to adjust the sidecar alignment at both mounting points on the frame. This allows you to set sidecar angle, ride height, and toe-in adjustments more easily.
3. Replacement of the chromed parts. Complete exhaust system, handlebar, rear and front fender clips, passenger grab handles, sidecar bumper, turn signal steams, push road covers are now made from 304 grade stainless steel. Stainless steel is stronger and more durable than chromed steel and will not rust. Small parts formerly chrome plated are now covered with polished hard chrome or powder painted.
Wheels
1. Aluminum rims. Aluminum 19” rims are installing on Patrol and Tourist models starting container 195 (shipped 12/31/2009). Rims made from 7050 aluminum alloy and have reinforced central channel. These rims are manufactured to higher tolerances and utilize a specific design for sidecar applications.
2. Aluminum front disc rotor adapter for all models
*Note that stainless steel and aluminum parts require specific care. Please make sure you explain this to the customers at the time of sale/delivery of the motorcycle. If you have any questions about this, please contact Jason Rae for recommendations.
Retro Model
1. Marzocchi Front Forks (http://www.marzocchi.com) 40 mm telescopic 
forks and low front fender for Retro. Oversized front forks provide a more stable ride and better control with a sidecar. The 40 mm forks have less side deflection and twist than the original 36 mm forks and use better oil and dust seals.
Paint
1. Powder painted body parts (gas tank, fenders, sidecar body, side panels etc.) for Tourist-T and Gear-Up (main color) models.

2011 Improvements
1. New paint options including more powder coated colors
2. Aluminum rims on all models including sT
3. Duro tires standard on all models
4. Trunk locks on all models
5. New round indicator lamps (for alternator, turn, neutral, high beam)
6. New Cordura (canvas) tonneau covers and aprons
7. Gear-up now equipped with single seat and rear fender rack
8. New aluminum upper fork bolts
9. Improved high strength final drive ring gear bolts with loctite and elimination of locking tabs

2012 Improvements
ALL MODELS
• Gloss black powder paint replaced with flat black powder paint for frames, swing arms, wheel hubs, luggage racks, handlebars and all other non-body parts
• New flat ignition rotor prevents contact between rotor and pick-up assembly. Ignition timing can still be adjusted by rotating the pick-up bracket.
• Standard 10.9 grade Allen head clutch screws replace the original slot screws. The flywheel and cover thrust plate have been modified to accommodate the new thread pitch and taper. These must be replaced as a set. Original clutch components are still available.
• New front brake reaction link replaces the original bar with bushings. The new tie rod style link uses ball joints at each end and will provide a longer service life. No more rubber or poly bushings needed.
• New one-piece laser cut shift pedal assembly has a cleaner appearance and finish. This also reduces the amount of welded seams.
• The clutch slider will now use a double o-ring for better sealing. The additional o-ring acts as a dust seal preventing damage to the inner most o-ring from dirt and debris.
• The clutch rod arm now uses a standard shoulder bolt in place of the original pin with cotter key.
• The factory made brake linkage forks and pins have been replaced with standard off the shelf parts.
• The castle nut has been replaced with a standard self-locking nut on the flex coupler.
• The valve cover gasket no longer will use the center cross brace, this will help prevent the gasket from pulling in when the valve cover is tightened.
• All wiring is now secured in the fenders using tabs similar to the sidecar fender. This replaces the wiring channel in the rear fender.
• Stainless clamps will be used on the entire exhaust system. These replace the factory made steel clamps. Stainless clamps do not rust and are higher quality, providing a better seal.
• The new brake switch is an electronic, spring-operated switch that is commonly seen throughout the industry. It is manufactured by K&S and can be used as an upgrade on any Ural with the use of a few new parts.

T series (1WD)
• Body parts: flat black powder paint without pin stripes or flat OD powder paint without pin stripes
• Gas tank – No knee grips
• No tool kit and air pump
• No cover for the driver seat

Patrol T (2WD)
• Body parts: flat black powder paint without pin stripes or flat OD powder paint without pin stripes
• Gas tank – No knee grips
• No tool kit and air pump
• No cover for the driver seat
• No tonneau cover
• No power outlet in the sidecar
• Sidecar drive shafts are now being powder coated on all 2 WD models

GEAR-UP
• Gobi – powder paint for the main color instead of regular liquid paint
• New “Forest Fog” paint scheme
• Sidecar drive shafts are now being powder coated on all 2 WD models
• The sidecar drive distance bushing has been changed to help reduce drive bearing failures.
• 2012 Gear-up models will now have a locking tool compartment on the fuel tank. The new lock replaces the old factory two-prong bolt.

RETRO
• European wire harness (similar to what in use for other models)
• Sidecar interior – standard
• No sidecar windshield
• No hand shifter
• Spare wheel installed at the factory
• Body parts – black powder paint with gloss clear coat, no pin stripes
• Trim – silver (stainless steel or polished aluminum)
• Single driver seat (“tractor” type) + luggage rack on the rear fender
• Wheels – silver aluminum rims + 18” Duro tires
• The Retro will now be equipped with the standard unified wire harness made by the same manufacture as all other models. The new harness requires the use of a slimmer profiled headlight.

TOURIST, PATROL
• Body parts for black and white colors - powder paint with gloss clear coat
• Body parts for all other colors and combinations – regular liquid paint with gloss clear coat
• Sidecar drive shafts are now being powder coated on all 2 WD models

______________________
This list, often found on dealer sites (this one from Tri-Quest) does list SKF bearings in 2007 but not where they are used.



News/Update Info



2011

New paint options including more powder coated colors
Aluminum rims on all models including sT
Duro tires standard on all models
Trunk locks on all models
New round indicator lamps
New Cordura (canvas) tonneau covers and aprons
Gear-up now equipped with single seat and rack
New aluminum upper fork bolts
Improved high strength final drive ring gear bolts


2010

Aluminum alloy rims for Patrol and Tourist models
Polymer driveshaft coupling
Rocker arms with needle bearings
Bearing instead of bronze bushing on the camshaft rear end
Polished ports of the cylinder head
Stainless steel used instead of chrome plating on all tubular parts (bumpers, clips, handles etc.)
New design of the low front mounting point of the sidecar
Marzocchi telescopic forks on Retro and ST models


2009

Stainless steel exhaust pipes and mufflers
Removable plate under the driver seat
Powder painted body parts on some models
Standard greasable u-joints for 2wd shaft (GMB)
Unified EU/US wire harness


2009

Stainless steel exhaust pipes and mufflers
Removable plate under the driver seat
Powder painted body parts on some models
Standard greasable u-joints for 2wd shaft (GMB)
Unified EU/US wire harness


2008

Complete new valve train including 7mm stem valves, sealed valve guides, hardened valve seats and stiffer valve springs
New clutch springs
Shock absorbers from Sachs
Pivot bearings installed in place of bushings in both front and rear swing arms
Tapered steering head bearings (SKF)
Steel braided brake hoses
New tool kit


2007

Ducati ignition system
Herzog precision cut timing gears and oil pump gears
Surfaced clutch plates for smooth operation
Herzog shafts and precision cut gears for gearbox
Reversed style drive shaft with larger spline surface area
Improved 2WD engagement rod with UNI balls
Improved front sidecar mount to allow more adjustment and negative camber
SKF sealed wheel bearings
Brembo floating disc on all models
Improved sidecar truck hinges and handle
Standard (7/8') handle bar size and removable risers
Bottom out travel limiter on sidecar swing arm
NAK seals
SKF bearings
High quality 8.8 hardware used throughout


2006

New header fastening system for exhaust pipes
Type V ignition (one-piece rotor)
Floating disc on Retro/Troyka front brake
Mechanical rear drum brakes on Retro
Petcock mounting on the tank without adapter
"Upside-down" type of air filter (non-CA motorcycles)
Ducati ignition (late 2006)
Neutral indicator off when reverse is "on"
Drive shaft with longer splines


2005

Front bumper for Patrol
New bench seats
New wire harness with power outlet in the sidecar


2004

Denso alternator
Type IV ignition (outside location, two-piece rotor)
Improved 2wd engagement lever (with fixing plate)


2003

Brembo disc brake
IMWA 750 engine (different valves, camshaft, pistons)

And here's IMWA's facebook list. http://www.facebook.com/notes/ural-m...87646684597220

It is ambiguous at best, and IMWA doesn't have any specifics on their web site, Does anyone have something specific saying what was used where?



------------------------

One interesting thing I found in IMWA's FAQ section, they do recommend taking spare parts and a COMPLETE tool kit on extended trips. http://www.imz-ural.com/faq/

I don't think any other manufacturer makes that admission.
so it isn't really accurate to say that they are guilty of misrepresenting the product, and any intelligent person should see advertising hype for what it is.
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Old 06-17-2012, 05:01 AM   #759
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Quote:
Originally Posted by windmill View Post
Kawasaki KLR 650, $6299
DMC enduro sidecar, $2495
DMC mounts, $550
DMC sidecar brake, $385
LL front end. $1500

Total, $ 11,220

Now since this is in comparison to a new finished, RTR Ural, figure another $1000 - $2000 for installation, paint and other assorted incidentals.
So we have an all new sidecar rig that has similar performance, a few known "issues", no reverse, an open enduro tub, a void warranty on a new motorcycle, and all for $2000 - $3000 more than a Ural Tourist T rig.

So yes a new Ural is expensive, but it is also a fair value when compared apple to apple.


I picked up my KLR hack used for $5000 (without LL front end). It was a $10,000 "investment" by the PO. The rig had 1800 miles on it.

I see used Urals holding their value much better than home built rigs regardless of manufacture. You will not lose 50% in your first 1500 miles on a Ural.
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Old 06-17-2012, 06:32 AM   #760
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Originally Posted by oppozit View Post
An average of 11.5 km per day or 14 km per riding day. When you get up to the milage where things go wrong, in twenty years or so, let us all know about it. Most Urals in the U.S. have phenomenally low milage which is why things haven't broken.
I think you missed something here. Most of the Ural haters have implied that something catastrophic should have happened by 10,000km.

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Old 06-17-2012, 06:38 AM   #761
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristof Granit View Post
Why you should buy a Ural: No statistics, no opinions just facts.


Total mileage of the Gear Up after the last ride: 17380km
For those that didn’t follow the previous rides with the Gear Up, it’s a 2011 model picked directly at the factory in June 2011.


Total mileage of the Retro after his first ride: 3635km



That’s the Retro by May 25th :


and the 28th at the arrival at Kirov.






Both Ural did it well, 6700km for Nikolai and 3600km for me.
We didn’t encounter any mechanical or electrical problems. All the minors issues were related to the poor conditions of the roads.
Gear Up:
- crack on the side due to the vibration of the search lamp.


- support of the canister get broken and the canister went away.


(nota: for the parade in town during the Bike Show in August, the base of the Club flag was installed in force,between the canister and the support, since there was a little gap on the mechanism to hold the canister and the direct consequence some vibrations… So user’s fault + bad roads = bye bye the canister).

- support of the seat to be re-welded, during the 3000km Novo/Irbit:

- one puncture on the hack rear tire.
- one turn signal bulb replaced.
- The bottom bolt of the cylinder protection get broken due to Nikolai “figure” (fly the chair and stop, on the side, in front of a car…), but hopefully the protection has done his job and no damage on the cylinder and Nikolai didn’t even scratch his rain suit.
Retro:
- few bolts have to be tied up after the Perm/Kirov section.
- the head lamp went broken in the same section and I use the high lamp all along, we didn’t drove by night and I even bend the lamp to avoid “disturbing” the oncoming traffic.
------------------

So after 14335km (10700+3635) in less than 6 months of exploitation (*) I am happy with my sidecars.

(* Due to my work I am at home only 6 months by year)
Are broken welds on a new bike with under 7000 miles acceptable on a bike meant for off-road?
I'd be disappointed.
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Old 06-17-2012, 07:36 AM   #762
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Originally Posted by gspell68 View Post
Until a few years ago, Ural & Dnepr frames were generally regarded as indestructible unless you took a blow torch to 'em...
I hear you .

In the immortal words of Bob Dylan , " the times they are a changing " .

Without seeing the part in the flesh everything at this point is speculation ... well apart from it broke

Notice two other points of interest in the picture ?




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Old 06-17-2012, 08:16 AM   #763
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Originally Posted by MotoJ View Post
Are broken welds on a new bike with under 7000 miles acceptable on a bike meant for off-road?
I'd be disappointed.
That's what I was thinking. Same reality (this is the distance we covered, here are the things that happened),but completely different interpretation of what it means.
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Old 06-17-2012, 08:32 AM   #764
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Notice two other points of interest in the picture ?



You mean that the studs are too short for the nylocs and there are no exposed threads for them to safely work? Hey it's a Ural not an aircraft! Don't be so picky!
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Old 06-17-2012, 08:35 AM   #765
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Noticed that , but not what I was referring to .


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