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Old 06-01-2012, 07:46 PM   #16
Hawk Medicine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gasolinePony View Post
Hi Wrenchers,

I am a newb from Holyoke, MA. To both AdRider, and to bike repair. I rebuilt my petcocks and recently changed my oil, and beyond that, I don't know nothin about nothin.

So, first of all, thanks for having me. I like AdV Rider. It's modern, although my bike tastes so far have not been.

I have an r75/6 with a /5 transmission (came that way), and a /7 tank (my work). It starts and runs like a champ, but it needs some help, and I'm slowly going to try to work my way through the bike and clean it up, one step at a time. Pics to come.


Welcome!

If youre looking for info concerning Airheads, you've found the right place.

OTOH, I would suggest that you post your Airhead related questions in the "Airhead" section. You may find some knowledgable guys in "Olds Cool" but BMW's have some hinks and jinks that are best explained by someone experienced with the marque.

I purchased a Clymer manual, but it is lacking in clarity, at times...so I'm looking for some help.

Good job. I'm glad that you bought a shop manual but I'd also suggest that you buy the Haynes manual as well and then sit down and read through both of them a couple of times to familiarize yourself with things. The Haynes is probably the best one technicly, but I consult both of those plus the BMW manuals.

First job:

My front ATE brake is dragging, and so I'm thinking of getting the rebuild kit from Hucky's. Do I get the one with the piston? Or try the o-ring fix first? (See, monkey can learn).

So, how the hell do I do this? See the title of this thread. I'm not hopeless, but I need good directions.


Youre going to need to disasemble and inspect your caliper and it's componants before ordering replacment parts. You'll need to know whether your piston is rusted/pitted beyond use. As is sometimes the case, the pistons are a bit pitted in the exposed areas but can be cleaned up enough to function correctly but the other side of the issue is that these are your brakes and a few extrs dollars spent to make them perfect, is a few dollars well spent.

So yeah... Remove the caliper, pump the piston out and see what gives. Me? whenever I buy a "new-to-me" Airhead, I check out the brake system, clean and rebuild it if necessary, replace the pads and then look at the Master Cly. When I grab the brakes, I want to stop!

By the way... Adding a second ATE caliper to your bike is probably the best investment that you could possibly make, other than buying good insurance and gas. Single disk Airheads were notoriously bad stoppers when they were new and theyre no better today, despite the fact that road conditions for MC riders have become a lot worse. (More traffic running at higher speeds, poorer driver training, doped-up drivers, texters, phoners, cars with vastly improved brakes, etc.

If you can swing the investment for that dual disk set-up, I'd rate it right up there with a MC Safety Foundation riders course. (And yes, I've done both. My Airhead has dual disks and I take one of the advanced riders courses whenever I can.)

Thanks for any help.

TAKE PITY ON MY NEWBIE SOUL. At least I'm trying.

Also, if there are fellow airhead or other riders that are in my area (Holyoke, MA), let's hit some pavement, or get out the wrenches!


Lastly, If you want to hook up with other Airheads, join the Airheads Beemer Club and then attend a few Airhead Tech Days. You'll be glad you did!
See ya round!
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Hawk Medicine screwed with this post 06-02-2012 at 12:03 AM
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Old 06-02-2012, 03:43 AM   #17
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There is a specific brake assembly lubricant to be used, which is very different from that anti-squeal grease. Using brake fluid to lubricate while assembling will work, but on the "dry side" of the brake system brake fluid will absorb moisture from the air and become corrosive.

One quick hit on a search:

http://www.wilwood.com/BrakeFluid/BrakeFluid.aspx



otherwise, Google "hydraulic brake assembly lube" for more info.
I had no idea, funny I've rebuilt many brake calipers, and my fair share of drums and I've never used anything other than what I suggested.

Is there a "real" reason to use this stuff. I'm not trying to start an argument, just curious.

I'm still pretty sure you're not going to the corner auto parts store to pick that up, unless you have a race shop nearby.

From a bit of poking around the web, this is an oil/chain lube subject...

About the only reason I can find to really use it, is if you are assembling the calipers and then setting them on a shelf for storage.

Also beware that the "anti-squeal" caliper greases are usually labeled as "assembly lube", but they do not go inside the brake system.
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Old 06-02-2012, 07:37 AM   #18
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If you decide to keep the stock lines, don't bleed the system, instead go to a vet or a feed and seed a get a big syringe. Then remove the m/c cap and drain the old brake fluid with the syringe, less to bleed through the system. (I would recommend swapping the lines to SS ones. It does make a difference.) the syringe also works to bleed brakes by forcing the fluid through the system from the bottom. like backwards bleeding, less air enters the system.. Ate brakes are kind of funny.....I will say a big problem with them is the pads coming apart, so watch out for that. You may be able to reuse all the parts by just cleaning them, so when you're removing the seals, be careful not to tear them. Here's a a good thread.
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Old 06-02-2012, 07:56 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by mjydrafter View Post
Is there a "real" reason to use this stuff. I'm not trying to start an argument, just curious.

I'm still pretty sure you're not going to the corner auto parts store to pick that up, unless you have a race shop nearby.
Similar stuff called "Rubber Grease" used to be easy to find, not anymore for some reason had to go overseas to find a big tub. Google "Miller Red Grease", has other uses as in protecting rubber from cracking etc...

I agree the brake fluid works fine but can be a problem if any of it is left externally, may attract moisture and cause corrosion.
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Old 06-02-2012, 10:17 AM   #20
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Before you get into a full caliper rebuild, on ATE brakes it is most likely that the brakes are dragging because the caliper has not been adjusted properly. It is covered in Clymers.

Replacing the brake fluid is not a bad idea on a new to you bike. Just keeping taking fluid out, as to top up the MC, so you don't introduce any air bubbles, just keep going until the fluid runs clear at the bottom end.

Charles
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Old 06-04-2012, 08:54 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by hardwaregrrl View Post
(I would recommend swapping the lines to SS ones. It does make a difference.) the syringe also works to bleed brakes by forcing the fluid through the system from the bottom. like backwards bleeding, less air enters the system.. Ate brakes are kind of funny.....I will say a big problem with them is the pads coming apart, so watch out for that. You may be able to reuse all the parts by just cleaning them, so when you're removing the seals, be careful not to tear them. Here's a a good thread.
@Chas, I'm going to look into the adjustment, thanks. I think I kind of want to tear it open though, since I've kept it outside through some tough winters, dirt roads, and the like.

Thanks, Hardwaregrrl. I think I will take your (and other's) advice to get a stainless line, but maybe for the next bleed. On the thread that you included above, it also mentioned the handlebar mounted master cylinder, which I thought was a cool system. I don't understand how it increases braking, but all in good time.

Can you give me any more advice about the brakes "coming apart"?

Thanks.

t.
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Old 06-05-2012, 02:46 AM   #22
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Rebuilding the caliper is not that cheap, the seals are expensive. As a 5 year old I would try the adjustment first!

+1 on the stainless lines. The original braking system is a strange mixture of mechanical operation, by means of the cable from the handlebar to the MC, then hydraulic onwards. Everyone else uses a much simpler all hydraulic system.

If you did go to the all hydraulic system Motobins sell a kit including the top SS hose and they can supply a 2 throttle cable M/C, get the smallest one you can find.
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Old 06-05-2012, 06:51 AM   #23
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The ATE caliper pivots on a pin, , which needs regular greasing if the brake is to work well.

And if the caliper isnt moving on the pin the brake will tend to bind.

The pin is is easy to remove, clean and relube , but you really need a manual to replace it , as the pivot area is ground off centre to enable the pads to be aligned with the disks.

In the early riders handbooks, the procedure was to line it up roughly by rotating the pin, then finally aligning it by applying the brake real hard, but along the way the proceedure seems to have changed to some esoteric procedure involving chalk , pointers , markers or whatever.

But if you get the caliper pivoting freely enough the old system works, and the brake works better too.
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Old 06-05-2012, 07:26 AM   #24
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All good advice above.
Are you sure the brakes are dragging? Binding or simply skimming the rotor? The wheel should spin freely while you hear the rotor passing the caliper, that is normal.
Caliper alignment will really only affect brake performance. Now would be a decent time to see if they are right. I do this with a sharpie by drawing a line from out to in on the rotor both sides. Lightly squeeze the lever and rotate the wheel back and forth. The pads should evenly rub off the marks.
Bleed: Suck out the old as suggested above (syringe) put fresh 4 in and bleed away. Do it until the fluid has run clean.
There is a good chance you need new hoses, then SS are the best choice. Then you bleed, bleed, bleed.
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Old 08-12-2012, 08:53 PM   #25
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So the reason I started this thread is that my front wheel will not roll. So, my first step was to bleed the brake line...

Now I have a question about the caliper--I pulled out the pin by screwing in the 8mm bolt, and a stiff pull. My understanding is that the caliper should then slide off at that point. But it's not coming off. What gives? Seized brake pads?
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:27 AM   #26
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You might have better luck if you take the front wheel off. If you've never taken the front wheel off then good. It's a good thing for you to learn how to do. Once wheel is off then you may be able to pry caliper off. Do you still have this caliper connected to the hydraulic lines? Might be better to disconnect the lines. You are going to spill brake fluid if you do this. That's usually OK. It can be spilt onto the ground with little harm. It washes away with plain water. The important thing to remember about spilt brake fluid is it will damage paint. So if any gets spilled on paint work wash it off right away.
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Old 08-13-2012, 02:05 PM   #27
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You might have better luck if you take the front wheel off. If you've never taken the front wheel off then good. It's a good thing for you to learn how to do. Once wheel is off then you may be able to pry caliper off. Do you still have this caliper connected to the hydraulic lines?
Hi, thanks for writing. I bled the whole system, because I'm changing over to SS lines. I could take the wheel off, but, they are really really stuck on there. Is a rubber mallet out of the question?
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Old 08-13-2012, 03:35 PM   #28
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A rubber mallet is allowed. I'm sorry but I don't know what year model you have? But it has Ate calipers? So those all have bolts in the lower part of the leg that holds the axles in. These bolts usually need a Hex Key type wrench to remove. So if you take those out and the large nut off the end of the axle it should be easy to drive the axle out with some kind of a drift. That is a round bar that is smaller in diameter than the axle. And even using a real hammer would be OK if you got everything else right so far.

If you try to remove the axle with the Hex Lock Bolts in place you might break something.

If you'll look in your manual you may see pictures and more detailed instructions. I hope you have a manual.

The tool kit drift pin tool is called a Tommy Bar. It is the correct diameter to fit the hole in the right side of the axle so it can be twisted and pulled at the same time. The axle can also be driven out with the Tommy Bar.

The Tommy Bar is also the handle for the OEM spark plug socket tool.
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Old 08-14-2012, 10:10 AM   #29
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A rubber mallet is allowed. I'm sorry but I don't know what year model you have? But it has Ate calipers?
Thanks. So this is for a 1974 R75/6 (single-disc ATE). So, to clarify, I thought that the bearing pin held the caliper in? I'd rather leave the tire on if possible, I'm working in a not-really-the-best spot, and it's tight. I will if I have to, of course.
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Old 08-19-2012, 10:18 PM   #30
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You might have better luck if you take the front wheel off. If you've never taken the front wheel off then good. It's a good thing for you to learn how to do.
Yep. Took off the wheel and had a much easier time. Harder part was getting my fender out...bluduh.

Anyway, I took off the caliper, and found this:



Which is ugly. I brought it to my buddy, who works at a shop with some tools. I mentioned that there were some safety precautions to take when trying to blow the piston out (Clymer manual); namely that you should point it away from you, and have it on a shop bench, shooting into a cloth. "Bah" he says, "It's stuck, and it's not going anywhere." After direct pressure, and some acetone(?), the thing fired out like a bullet from a gun. I might be a noob, but I respect what I'm told.
The piston was seized and corroded on the outer wall, which was why it was stuck.

After I got over the fact that the thing shot past my head, we moved on, and he sandblasted and repainted the exterior.



Before I replace the piston (which I got from Hucky's), should I scotchbrite the surface rust inside the piston bore? Is there a better method?

gasolinePony screwed with this post 08-21-2012 at 10:57 AM Reason: forgot to mention a thing or two
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