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Old 06-06-2012, 10:51 AM   #31
Wuwei
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I keep a microfiber wash cloth in a tank bag pocket. Get it wet for quick face shield clean up while riding--if you've been regularly using Plexus or Pledge or something, the wet wash cloth usually takes the bugs right off, and it can just be tossed in the washer once in awhile or washed out in a motel sink. Someone here on ADV suggested the further refinement of keeping the wet wash cloth in a ziploc bag so it doesn't dry out all day. I keep my wallet, a small camera, my cell phone, chap stick, pocket knife, etc. in a small click-clack style storage container so it doesn't all float around in my tank bag, I can instantly grab all the valuables if I go inside a store or restaurant, everything is further protected from even the heaviest rain, and the phone is less likely to get smashed or lost in the case of an accident. It also avoids the usual endless hunt through the sixteen different pockets in my riding gear.
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Old 06-06-2012, 01:53 PM   #32
Starkmojo
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I always fill up at the end of the ride- that way if I cant ride for awhile there is less chance of condensation in the tank. Also I am forver almost late and it saves me having to get gas BEFORE the ride.. or be that guy who shows up late and demands we head to the gas station. No one likes that guy.
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Old 06-06-2012, 02:21 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Benesesso View Post
After washing and rinsing, it's simple to put them on something absorbent and smash the water out of 'em. Day or two later they're dry as a bone.
Good suggestion.

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Sorry, that is not what I meant. 10 years is a long time to reuse a disposable product is what I was meaning. I wasn't clear.
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Old 06-06-2012, 02:27 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by helion42 View Post
One I'm sure everybody knows but for some reason I always forget to put my helmet on before the gloves. I will still end up trying to strap it for a full minute or so thinking it might work this time, before throwing the gloves off and trying for real

The gun cable lock is a good idea.

Amen... One day I'll do it successfully. I can usually get the strap in place but can never snap it to the button thing
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Old 06-06-2012, 09:22 PM   #35
Water9119dog
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I always carry lemon pledge for cleaning up my helmet, face shield, screen and the bike. Plus you get that nice lemon smell after.
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Old 06-06-2012, 09:56 PM   #36
IheartmyNx
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1: Mirrors. I know it looks cooler without them, but it's illegal and shoulder checks might get you a tour of a ditch or unwanted attention from the uniformed tax collectors with your look backs...

1a: Never stop square behind another car. Stop to the side. If you get hit by an errant car you'll either go flying or hopefully they'll hit the car and you'll escape unharmed. The Sandwich Zone: Stay out of it.

2: Ear plugs. Walmart has them for less than $2.

3:Gloves. Don't be that guy and wear them. At the very least a jacket too. Boots would also be nice.

4: Phone: in a safe, padded and in an easily reachable spot. Least you get separated from your bike, or pinned under it and it's out of reach.

5: Head on a swivel. Never become complacent. Keep your eyes moving. Don't let yourself get board (do zig zagz) or sleepy. Keep your reflexes sharp!

Practice hard swerves in between letters painted on the road. Pretend the painted words are obstacles in the road and practice counter-steering or swerving to avoid them, but if you miss no biggie.

6: Pass like your life depends on it. Favark a ticket! You can argue the reasoning in court! But you'll be alive to explain it Meandering beside a truck you can get blown by the plow/push wind, or he could have a blowout and swerve, or you could get hit by debris. Either way, MOVE!

7: Get a debit or credit card... They can put flat screen TV's up at gas pumps now, but not cameras that would let us go back to the mystical glory days of not having to pre-pay for gas.

8: Keys. I put my MC keys in one zippered jacket pocket, and the rest in another. Reaching for keys in a pocket full of $hit with gloves on is a bit$%!

8a: Wallet and cell phone too. Get things out of your pants pockets... Unless you want to lose them.

9: Watch! If it's a big stainless steel one, don't wear it. It could cut your wrist in an offy.

10: Be observant. Know EVERYTHING from funny quarks your bike makes to the condition of the tires.

That way if it rains you know to slow it down even more if your tread is low... Or you know when you hit that pothole to raise up off the seat a little because your suspension is CRAP but you won't lose it because you know how the bike handles from previous experiences.

Everything. Take it all in as one big picture and everything you do, how it effects that major part.

Say like you need brakes.. Go easy on them until you change them .No hot laps or hard riding...

Or those two cush drives you used because you lost the other 4... Go easy on the backing-it-in or downshifting till you get it fixed.

It's all one big picture and you need to get it.
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IheartmyNx screwed with this post 06-10-2012 at 11:39 PM
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Old 06-07-2012, 06:56 AM   #37
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I nominate IheartmyNX to write a followup safety book to Hough's Proficient Motorcycling. I'd call it Practical Motorcycling. Good tips. Thx.
Lee
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Old 06-07-2012, 07:04 AM   #38
daveinva
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-- Carry a small bottle of Visine in your tank bag. Every once in a while if I've got my visor cracked for venting I'll get dust in my eyes, better to pull over and wash out my eyes than squint painfully all the way home.

-- Don't stop at the line, stop before the line and give yourself room to creep up/escape from traffic behind you. Also, if you don't have brake flashers installed, tap your brakes to "wake up" folks behind you.

-- When turning from a stop, before looking left and right for traffic, steal a glance at the center of the intersection to spot road debris/gravel. Avoid that.

-- Don't ride in blind spots. Don't ride next to tractor trailers. Don't ride behind open-ended trucks.

-- Develop and embrace low-level OCD. A safety routine before getting on the bike ensures that you don't forget something important.

-- Watch the right white line as much if not more than the double yellow in the middle, particularly in blind twisties. I find I'm far less likely to drift over the double yellow if I'm avoiding fixating on it.
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Old 06-07-2012, 07:13 AM   #39
RidingDonkeys
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Quote:
2. I have also tied a little strip of nylon parachute cord to the zipper to make gloved zipping easier. Don't make it too long or it will flog you at speeds over 80.
I've lived by this one for years. A little 550 cord goes a long way to making zippers motorcycle glove friendly.


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Old 06-07-2012, 07:34 AM   #40
tkent02
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Little piece of PVC pipe with a couple feet of duct tape, electrical tape, masking tape wrapped around it, and a shop rag stuffed inside.
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Old 06-07-2012, 09:38 AM   #41
judobiker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IheartmyNx View Post
9: Watch! If it's a big stainless steel one, don't wear it. It could cut your wrist in an offy.
Never thought about that one before. I have always worn my stainless watch both on and off road. Losing a hand is definitely worth considering...
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:57 AM   #42
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Judobiker wrote:

Quote:
Never thought about that one before. I have always worn my stainless watch both on and off road. Losing a hand is definitely worth considering...
What time is it when the little hand is on 2 and the big hand is laying on the ground?


Seriously now - Back in the good old days bike headlights were mounted to the handlebars and you could change the direction of the beam with any movement of the bars. The bars are always moving a bit and the beam looks different on old bikes than it does on new bikes with the headlamp fixed in the fairing.

I have a theory about this - Fixed stable beams are more easily ignored as just a distant streetlight or a glare off something than are the moving wobbling beams of modulators or handlebar mounted lights.

Whenever I am approaching a car in the left turn lane (death lane) or they are stopped at a cross street, I waggle the bike back and forth a bit to give them some lateral movement in hopes of catching their eye and letting them know I am an approaching bike and not a beer bottle reflecting the sun.

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Old 06-07-2012, 02:08 PM   #43
AlanCT
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Toll booths.

Instead of fumbling with tickets, gloves, money, clutch lever, etc., here's what I do.

Keep your toll ticket in a zip lock bag along with an assortment of change and small bills. At the booth, just hand over the bag to the toll collector and let him take what he needs.
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Old 06-07-2012, 02:37 PM   #44
frontiercat
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Originally Posted by judobiker View Post
Never thought about that one before. I have always worn my stainless watch both on and off road. Losing a hand is definitely worth considering...
Rings are a no-no too. Finger can be "degloved"...google that...
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Old 06-07-2012, 02:53 PM   #45
Wuwei
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OT, but I'm not a great fan of SS watch bands after I've been zapped a few times while working on my car and on boats--luckily in both cases it was just 12 volts, but it could be nasty if working with 110 or 220.
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