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Old 07-06-2012, 05:49 PM   #166
LewisNClark
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The Vigel of Old Shep

(Fort Benton, Montana) - along the side of the L & C Trail.










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Old 07-06-2012, 06:54 PM   #167
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This is still a beautiful spot. I thought the No Camping sign was a nice juxtaposition. On this trip I also traveled to Astoria, OR, which was founded as a fur trading post in 1811. The Columbia River Maritime Museum is located there and it's quite spectacular.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbi...aritime_Museum

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Old 07-06-2012, 07:53 PM   #168
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melville View Post
Word. I thought there was a piece of bronze that told some of the story there, but perhaps I'm misremembering.

Neat to learn about the rock itself.
I wanted to put up a bronze memorial for a family member and the cemetery folks told me not to bother; the bronze is stolen and melted down in no time.
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Old 07-07-2012, 09:37 AM   #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBob View Post
I wanted to put up a bronze memorial for a family member and the cemetery folks told me not to bother; the bronze is stolen and melted down in no time.
Yeah, and this one is close to a tweaktastic defunct company town.
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Old 07-07-2012, 12:36 PM   #170
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A new one on me, found within 30 miles of the house this morning:




Found these links that tell a little more about the incident:

http://home.comcast.net/~5thuscc/simpson.htm

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/W...ville_Kentucky
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Old 07-07-2012, 06:08 PM   #171
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Salt works..that interesting.

William Clark's family lived fairly close to that Civil War marker. Wm's brother George Rogers Clark's plantation is fairly close by. My point is Wm Clark knew and directed troops to make a Salt Works camp near Astoria, Oregon, but out on the Pacific Ocean's sea water. In one of my markers above (about West Point, KY) I did not mention it but there was a salt works in West Point during the Civil War era (there's a marker where the salt kettles were located)...and the salt works was on the banks of the "Salt River" just north of West Point, Ky.

Salt was obviously key to preserving meat in those days.
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Old 07-07-2012, 06:50 PM   #172
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Another Top 10 of my favorite Markers.

Some history:
John Colter was a member of the L & C Expedition. The Expedition camped (often not by choice) with their Indian neighbors. To entertain themselves they often had contests with the Indians (especially on the Return Journey). Everything from throwing rocks to foot racing. The Indians frequently beat them, when they wanted to win a foot race they called on John Colter. Lewis was possibly the most physically fit of the entire Expedition but John Colter was a close second. Colter reportedly could run like a deer.

On the Return journey back to St Louis, John Colter, a Army Private soldier, stepped forward to the Captains and announced he wanted to resign from the military. Shocked the Captains, agreed to let him out if no one else ask to leave the service. None did!

At Fort Mandan, North Dakota Colter bid his farwell. He simply did not want to leave the wilderness that he had just experienced. The Indians had told them about the magical place now called Yellowstone, the steam, abundant buffalo and elk herds, etc. That's where he was headed.

Excuse the long description:

To get to Yellowtone, Colter had to follow the Missouri River all the way back to N Dakota and Montana to the Missouri Headwaters, today's Three Forks, MT...where the Missouri River turns into a creek.

There he was attacked and captured by a gang of Blackfoot Indians. Knowing enough sign language to get by, he talked his way into a "contest" with their most athletic brave. To slow him down, the Blackfeet would strip him of his clothes and shoes and chase him down on horseback in the middle of the night. You guessed it...Colter got away. Running through brush and through creeks he escaped into the darkness of night.

Necked, he traveled for a week thru winter weather and finally ran across a trapper and his wife who gave him clothes and food.......

With Yellowstone his objective the below map illustrates his route from Three Forks, Montana to the Tetons of Yellowstone. He was a trapper and hunted to survive...and as a solo adventurer he was very lucky to have survive.

Based on topographical maps I knew roughly where he had to have traveled to reach the Tetons and was riding some back roads and I'll be darn if I did not run into this marker back in June of this year.

Looks cold but it wasn't:


His route:



Being on foot, what he had to have walked through south of Ennis with his 30 pound backpack, plus his beaver traps:



Had to have walked through The Gravely Range: (see DockingPilots RR)




No road signs or maps:


Red Rock Lake is inside Gravely Range: A buddy and I did the Gravely Range last fall and it is about 350 miles across.



I saw one herd of no less than 200 elk along the borders of Gravely Range. These were 500 yards away.




For any hunters: These elk herds were near Cameron, MT.



I knew roughly where he had to have hiked but was pleasantly surprised when I saw this Marker:



Picture taken from in front of the sign. He was on the west side of the Tetons looking due East towards today's Yellowstone National Park. The land referred to Upper Snake River range is today, one of Ted Turners buffalo ranches.



The Tetons being called the "Big Tits", I thought it was a Harley crowd thing, apparently not (see Marker below - Three Big Breast).



If anyone is in the area and want to see the marker it is close to the little community of Driggs, Idaho. In the middle of NOWHERE!

John Colter's travels on foot were roughly 200 miles to the marker and probably another 40 miles over the Tetons. It's believed he probably hiked through one of the lower ridges. No written journals as to how he got over the Tetons except he later wrote about seeing the steam coming from the ground...that the Indians had told the Expedition about.

Most landmarks on the West side of Yellowstone are named after John Colter. Colter's Hell, Colters Campgrounds, Rec. Area, etc. etc.
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Old 07-07-2012, 10:07 PM   #173
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostdncr View Post
A new one on me, found within 30 miles of the house this morning:

....
Tis nice to come across nearby history. Thanks for that marker and historical tale. Interesting touch with the headstones.
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Old 07-08-2012, 07:19 AM   #174
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Since we love history in this thread I want to share a very thought provoking article from today's NYT. Politicians seem always ready to use episodes from history to justify their positions but the reality is often quite different.



http://campaignstops.blogs.nytimes.c...aign-trail/?hp
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Old 07-08-2012, 04:28 PM   #175
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Cherokee Strip









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Old 07-08-2012, 06:24 PM   #176
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Would this be considered a "historical marker" or just a sign at an old fort?



Located here:
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Old 07-09-2012, 08:10 AM   #177
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'Dam the torpedos, full speed ahead"

'Dam the torpedos, full speed ahead" as part of the sign make it a Marker in my opinion.

Had no idea that came from the Battle of Mobile Bay.

Just went by the Tabasco Factory Tour and went real close to Fort Gaines but didn't know it was there. Added Fort Gaines to my bucket list.

Tabasco Factory:


Factory thru a very dirty window: The factory floor looked to be about the size of a basketball court.
Surprisingly small.




The Tabasco Factory:



Interesting tid-bit: Tabasco buys the used oak aging barrels from Jack Daniel Distillery to age their tabasco hot sauce. Barrels are used at Tabasco for 10 to 15 years. Tabasco sells the oak barrels for furniture and flower planters. Barrels get about 50-70+ yrs of use.
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Old 07-09-2012, 03:45 PM   #178
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The Meeker Massacre

A quick tale, told by signs and images, of the Utes last "military stand against white encroachment".

Here's the location of the "Meeker Massacre" a few miles west of Meeker on Colorado 64...


From the location above, turn 90 degrees to the right and one views this sign telling what happened...




So let's ride to the Milk Creek Battlefield Site. NW Colorado, the location of these events, is an oft overlooked area of the state for riding and adventure. It shouldn't be. Utterly scenic and utterly lonely, it routinely over delivers, at least for me, a ride experience. Another name for the Milk Creek Battle, is the Thornburgh Battle, named for the major who didn't last long into the conflict...


The approach to the battlefield park...


On this day, undergoing some refurbishment...


The monument erected in honor and remembrance of the cavalry...


A recent memorial dedicated to the Utes, offering a somewhat different p-o-v...


Quite the beautiful and peaceful setting, with placid and meandering Milk Creek, in contrast to the events of 1879...
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:51 PM   #179
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Originally Posted by sfarson View Post

A recent memorial dedicated to the Utes, offering a somewhat different p-o-v...
A long overdue POV in my opinion.
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Old 07-09-2012, 08:05 PM   #180
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On the evening of October 25, 1782 during a storm, a Belgium cutter was driven off course until it ran aground on the Barnegat Shoals. The next morning, Capt. Andrew Steelman of Cape May and the crew of his privateer boat the Alligator `found' the abandoned cutter with its cargo. Steelman claimed the ship and sent crew members into town to enlist all extra hands to help unload the ship. The skulking William Wilson of Waretown, instead of joining the crew, went to inform John Bacon, the notorious Tory bandit of the prize capture.

Pirates storing treasure - Image courtesy of Clipart et
Bacon quickly gathered his men aboard his whaleboat Hero's Revenge and set sail for Long Beach Island. Capt. Steelman, his crew and energetic volunteers spent the day unloading barrels and boxes of Hynson Tea from the Cutter. In the evening, the men slept on the beach, resting from the hard day's work and drunk from celebration at such a rich prize. Many of the volunteers were unarmed. Under cover of darkness, John Bacon's crew made a stealth landing on the bay side of Long Beach Island. They snuck across the island to the beach and maliciously slaughtered around 20 to 30 sleeping men. A few managed to escape including one son of Joseph Soper.


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