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Old 07-13-2012, 06:00 PM   #196
LewisNClark
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Council Grove is facinating

I've been thru there doing the Santa Fe Trail a few yrs ago.
Fascinating history!

The Indian Squaw in a red dress riding a white horse marker is near there.

The Council Grove Oak Tree's main purpose was as a mail box. Settlers traveling West on wagon trails
left their letters for relatives and friends to find when then passed. Travelers would stop at the old Oak and look through the letters at the bottom of the tree to see if they had any mail.

All the trees in Council Grove provided a shade/oasis for the thousands of wagons passing through. Council Grove is one of those "so" significant places history tends to forget. I was amazed at the history over just a few city blocks.
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Old 07-13-2012, 06:14 PM   #197
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Red Dress.

I do not have a pic of that marker, but here is the text to it. It is on the Santa Fe Trail, but is about two hundred miles west up the trail from Council Grove, in Edwards County Ks.

BATTLE OF COON CREEK
A battle between U.S. troops and Plains Indians occurred near this area along the Santa Fe Trail in 1848 and inspired stories and legends for years to come. An army train of 60 wagons was traveling through Comanche and Apache hunting grounds on its way to Fort Mann (about 6 miles west of here, near the present site of Dodge City) when the fighting began. The small company of U.S. troops was armed with rifles and cannons against the larger group of Plains Indians, who had only bows and arrows. Eyewitnesses reported seeing an American Indian woman on horseback at the front of their line encouraging the men. Wearing a scarlet dress “decorated with silver ornaments,” she “rode about giving directions about the wounded.” The Indians sustained heavy losses during the conflict and when a courageous Apache teenager returned to recover the body of one of the fallen, U.S. soldiers held their fire. One legend said that young man was Geronimo, a future Apache leader.

On US-50
Two miles east of Kinsley at the Arkansas River bridge.
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Old 07-13-2012, 06:29 PM   #198
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Old 07-13-2012, 06:50 PM   #199
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That looks like the marker text

My and other's interest is how she got the Red Dress...it indicates that traders were trading with the Indians for probably furs. The Spanish were possibly entering the US from the south (Mexico), and trading with the Indians earlier than the first settlers/traders arrived. I'm pretty sure the marker I saw mentioned that some Spanish Troops first saw this lady on the RED dress and she was the leader of the Indian party...which is a rarity.

The Spanish were exploring Kansas in 1541. This LINK shows about a 100 yrs of history.

Link:
http://www.vlib.us/old_west/lineoftime.html


Thanks for finding that text. The marker I saw was very old and made out of cast iron.

Billy the Kid (I think) had a house or stayed a few blocks from the stump in Council Grove.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sod Buster View Post
I do not have a pic of that marker, but here is the text to it. It is on the Santa Fe Trail, but is about two hundred miles west up the trail from Council Grove, in Edwards County Ks.

BATTLE OF COON CREEK
A battle between U.S. troops and Plains Indians occurred near this area along the Santa Fe Trail in 1848 and inspired stories and legends for years to come. An army train of 60 wagons was traveling through Comanche and Apache hunting grounds on its way to Fort Mann (about 6 miles west of here, near the present site of Dodge City) when the fighting began. The small company of U.S. troops was armed with rifles and cannons against the larger group of Plains Indians, who had only bows and arrows. Eyewitnesses reported seeing an American Indian woman on horseback at the front of their line encouraging the men. Wearing a scarlet dress “decorated with silver ornaments,” she “rode about giving directions about the wounded.” The Indians sustained heavy losses during the conflict and when a courageous Apache teenager returned to recover the body of one of the fallen, U.S. soldiers held their fire. One legend said that young man was Geronimo, a future Apache leader.

On US-50
Two miles east of Kinsley at the Arkansas River bridge.
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Old 07-13-2012, 07:14 PM   #200
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The Comanches and Apache out that way were demanding and sometimes paid in goods from the east bound Mexican and west bound American caravans for safe passage along that part of the trail. They also were pretty ruthless on there raiding in New Mexico then.
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Old 07-13-2012, 10:22 PM   #201
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Post Office Oak.

LC, the Post Office Oak is just a little west of the Council Oak, and is another covered tree trunk like the Council Oak, it stood in front of the old brewery. Why they built the Brewery right on top of it is strange, when alive it stood on the left side of the staircase by the porch.




The Kaw and the Cheyenne had long been enemies, and in an altercation with the Kaw, in which the Cheyenne took offence had occured near Fort Zarah (now Great Bend) to the west along the trail. On June 1, 1868, about one hundred Cheyenne warriors descended on the Kaw reservation, about three miles to the southeast of town. Terrified white settlers took refuge in Council Grove. By some acounts the Cheyenne rode through Council Grove on their way out to the Kaw Reservation.





The Kaw men painted their faces, donned their finery, and sallied forth on horseback to meet the Cheyenne. The two Indian armies put on a military pageant featuring horsemanship, fearsome howls and curses, and volleys of bullets and arrows. After four hours, the Cheyenne retired with a few stolen horses and a peace offering of coffee and sugar by the Council Grove merchants. Nobody was hurt on either side. They say many folks from Council Grove rode out and watched the battle from the hills above.


The Brewery marker.





During the battle, the mixed-blood Kaw interpreter, Joseph James Jr (more commonly known as Jojim or Joe Jim) galloped 60 miles to Topeka to request assistance from the Governor. Riding along with Jojim was an eight-year old, part- Kaw Indian boy named Charles Curtis or “Indian Charley.” Curtis would later become a jockey, a lawyer, a politician, and Vice President of the United States under Herbert Hoover. The highest office ever held by a person of Native American Heritage.
Charles Curtis was born January 25, 1860, in Topeka, Kansas, to Oren Arms and Ellen (Pappan) Curtis. He spent his earliest years partly in the white and partly in the Native American community, he spoke Kaw and French before he learned to speak English. The son of Orren Curtis, a white man, and Ellen Pappan, who was one-quarter Kaw Indian, Charles Curtis on his mother's side was the great-great grandson of White Plume, a Kansa-Kaw chief who had offered assistance to the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804. White Plume's daughter married Louis Gonville, a French-Canadian fur trader, and their daughter, Julie Gonville, married Louis Pappan. Curtis’ mother died when he was three and his early life was spent with his maternal grandmother and other relatives on the Kaw Indian Reservation near Council Grove. Life was unsettled on the reservation. Due to conflicts among the Kaws, Cheyennes, and Arapahos, young Curtis was sent to Topeka in 1868 to live with his paternal grandmother.






Believed to have been 270 years old when it died in 1990, this bur oak is said to have served as an unofficial post office for travelers on the Santa Fe Trail from 1825-1847. Passing caravans could leave messages for future travelers in a cache in the base of the tree.



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Old 07-14-2012, 10:38 AM   #202
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Old 07-14-2012, 11:51 AM   #203
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Old 07-14-2012, 01:26 PM   #204
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Old 07-14-2012, 09:39 PM   #205
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Love the tree images, and historical details!
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Old 07-15-2012, 12:47 PM   #206
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Custer Elm.

Really great historical pics of trees MrBob and Dorzok, and a really good one of the Santa Fe Trail ruts Hanzo.

When I read the redwood marker I thought Wow it took 60 man hours to cut it down. Then I read it again, 60 man hours to cut it down, 1753 years to grow it!





The Oak tree to the left of the bikes.







G.A. Custer died in 1876, Libby Custer and Amos Kimball sold the 120 acres in 1881. I think Amos Kimball would have to be Brigadier General. U.S Army, Amos Kimball. He was not that rank at the time but he served along with Custer in the 1868 69 Winter Campaign against the Plains Indians.



When the army moved west it always came through Council Grove as the trail west connects to the Smoky Hill and all the Kansas Frontier Forts, it was the entrance to the Central Great Plains, into the very heart of Native America..




The property buts up to the Neosho River just into the treeline behind.




The tree died of Dutch Elm Disease, in the 1970s, I don't know about elsewhere but Kansas lost a ton of old trees to Dutch Elm in the 70s.

Custer Elm while still alive.


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Old 07-15-2012, 06:15 PM   #207
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Trees (I'll play)

Lewis and Clark Expedition was conducted by the book, Army SOP procedure handbook. Most days they would select a campsite and someone was assigned to locate a level spot for their kitchen (cooking area) next to a clean running stream. Since the blacksmith and bullet maker and the cooks both needed a campfire they shared space and campfires.

For obvious sanitary and privacy reasons someone else would walk off 100 paces from the kitchen campsite and clean running creek to define the location for their latrine.



In 2001 a archaeologist/historian came up with a cleaver idea.

In 1803 a Dr. Rush had supplied M. Lewis with a concoction of a medicine as a cure-all for constipation, headaches, and even childbirth. This "medicine's" primary component was mercury. Not good for human consumption but worked well as a laxative. And yes, M Lewis gave Sacajawea a dose of "Dr. Rush's Revenge" medicine when she was having a difficult time giving birth to Jean Baptiste.

With mercury lasting hundreds of years without decomposing, the archaeologist decided to search for the L & C latrine at a campsite the Expedition stayed at for 7 days. After only a few days of searching the scientist discovered heavy concentrations of mercury in a small area of soil at their "Travelers Rest" camp. They walked off 100 paces towards the nearby creek and soon discovered lead (that was used to make their bullets. Private Shields was the bullet maker and as he melted the lead around the campfire he would always drop some of the melted lead on the ground. (see picture)

Site of the latrine and mercury beside this tree. The tree was drilled for age rings in 2001 and would have been standing when L & C camped at Travelers Rest. Making it around 211 years old. If only trees could talk.



Site of Latrine:



Site of kitchen and blacksmith campfire along Lolo Creek, 100 paces from the latrine.

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Old 07-15-2012, 06:28 PM   #208
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Not far from my house is this Cottonwood tree:

"The national champion Plains Cottonwood tree is more than 300 years old, 36 feet around and 105 feet tall. It is located about a mile from Hygiene, Colorado on a closed property maintained by Boulder County Parks and Open Space."



I'll bet other places claim to have the largest Cottonwood, too. Whatever, this thing is huge. There is a fast-running irrigation ditch between myself and the tree so I couldn't get to the rise in front of the tree. The bulk of the trunk is down in a depression. The tree also appears to be stone-dead.

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Old 07-15-2012, 08:21 PM   #209
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Not too far from home:





I'm not happy about the paint. This tree was vandalized recently.
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Old 07-15-2012, 09:31 PM   #210
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Terrific tree stuff. They do indeed tell tales and participate in tales.
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