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Old 07-22-2012, 10:40 PM   #226
nwcolorider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LewisNClark View Post
followed part of the Pony Express Trail a few yrs ago and went right by Milk Creek and did not even know it. A spur of the Pony Express traveled thru Craig, Colorado.

An interesting map: How the pioneers, troops, trading posts, etc and Pony Express traveled east to west.

http://cprr.org/Museum/Maps/Pony_Express.html
If you go to the Battle Site, do not miss the White River Museum

They have great stuff on Meeker and the battle, also the museum of Northwest Colorado in Craig
I would be glad to show you around if I am not working.
Tom Horn
The Wild Bunch
Isom Dart
Matt Rash
Queen Ann Bassett
Bob Meldrum
Joe Herrera
They all hung out around here. Some literally!
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Old 07-22-2012, 11:04 PM   #227
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In March 1958, an American B-47E bomber flying en route to Britain dropped its payload — an atomic bomb similar to the infamous Fat Boy — on Florence, South Carolina. Luckily, only six people were injured. No one died.
Blessedly, it didn’t detonate. Well, actually, it sorta did.
The payload was released right over the home of Walter Gregg of Mars Bluff, a small, rural area of South Carolina. The fissile material for the bomb was stowed away separately on the plane, the trigger however, 7,600 pounds of TNT, went off on impact, obliterating poor Gregg’s house, injuring his family, damaging a nearby church and houses within a five-mile radius. According to local reports, the TNT itself left a crater 70 by 35 feet wide and was big enough to produce a small mushroom cloud. The Greggs received a small settlement.
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Old 07-23-2012, 07:46 PM   #228
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James Gang

Whites Creek, Tennessee

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Old 07-23-2012, 07:49 PM   #229
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Old 07-23-2012, 07:52 PM   #230
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Old 07-23-2012, 08:34 PM   #231
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Good one's Cap.

And that Bombs the Bomb bub!
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Old 07-23-2012, 10:38 PM   #232
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Originally Posted by elzebub View Post




In March 1958, an American B-47E bomber flying en route to Britain dropped its payload — an atomic bomb similar to the infamous Fat Boy — on Florence, South Carolina. Luckily, only six people were injured. No one died.
Blessedly, it didn’t detonate. Well, actually, it sorta did.
The payload was released right over the home of Walter Gregg of Mars Bluff, a small, rural area of South Carolina. The fissile material for the bomb was stowed away separately on the plane, the trigger however, 7,600 pounds of TNT, went off on impact, obliterating poor Gregg’s house, injuring his family, damaging a nearby church and houses within a five-mile radius. According to local reports, the TNT itself left a crater 70 by 35 feet wide and was big enough to produce a small mushroom cloud. The Greggs received a small settlement.
I never knew that. Thanks for the historical moment.

And yes capt, great sign captures, then expanded views. And good for W.W. Earthman to make that arrest of Tom Hill.
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Old 07-23-2012, 10:52 PM   #233
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From a recent ride through the Colorado National Monument SW of Grand Junction.

Here's an interpretive sign above one of the many canyons. Tried to make it big enough, but not too obtrusively so, so it can be read!...


Gonna have to scroll back and forth. Here's the canyon referred to by the sign...


Perhaps this approach is better, if the words can be read. Could have done a better job matching the image capture with the sign, but this posting is an afterthought! Later on through the journey through the monument...
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Old 07-24-2012, 06:35 PM   #234
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Fort Larned Ks, on Barracks wall.

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Old 07-25-2012, 06:59 AM   #235
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Fort Hays Ks, Armory Wall.

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Old 07-25-2012, 04:17 PM   #236
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Louisiana Purchase Territory (got lost)



This is one of those historical things that got lost.

France (under the command of Napoleon) held and claimed lands that are now basically Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Nebraska, etc). In 1803, Napoleon saw that Pres. Jefferson was ultimately going to explore the territory and HE had no significant military in North American to keep Thomas Jefferson from settling the area....so agreed to sell "all lands that drained into the Mississippi River:. At the time no one knew what those lands included...but it was called the Louisiana Territory. T. Jefferson bought the Louisiana Territory under the Louisiana Territory Purchase Treaty.

Shortly after 1803 a team of surveyors traveled to the territory to survey the land and document the southern boundaies of the Louisiana Territory, but it eventually was lost deep in the swamp. Today to get to the marker you have a 100 yards of boardwalk above the swamp.

A group of hunters, one being an educated surveyor, found the marker almost 100 years later. The hunting party was in a remote swamp when they saw a series of downed trees in various directions and the surveyor/hunter realized it was the trail of a surveyor's marker, further research identified this site as the long lost southern boundary marker of the Louisiana Purchase Territory.

The signs provide more detail.







This marker is near Brinkley, Arkansas, about 14 miles off interstate I-40 exit at Brinkley.

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LewisNClark screwed with this post 07-27-2012 at 11:14 AM
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Old 07-25-2012, 05:28 PM   #237
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Written in Stone...

The rock wall signatures of Soldiers at the forts were not condoned but guys that were geting out of the service or heading west would have at it, many of them were done just before these forts were decommisioned.

Here is the story of one of those signatures, I'm sad to say I do not have a digital pic of the McLaughlin stone, so I will post some of the other signatures at Larned.


The story of Private John Henry McLaughlin. Fort Larned Kansas, 1866 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, Company B.




the restoration crew, from Harpers Ferry, carefully removed the stone from the north wall of the old Commissary during its stabilization process in 2005. The stone was large, weighing about 100 pounds, but interesting enough it was what was carved into the topside of this stone that got everyone’s attention. Nineteen characters that spell J H Mc LAUGHLIN CO B 3 RGT settles the question asked for years. Did the soldiers construct this building or did the civilian contractors do the work?

Commissary.




The fact that McLaughlin placed the stone at the top, face up, so that the roof would cover the carvings tell us he knew the hazards of defacing government property, a pitfall that is still in force today. McLaughlin military records reveal a very colorful and robust individual.

Commissary.




John Henry McLaughlin was born June 22, 1826 in Limerick, Ireland. At age 20 he boarded a famous sea craft named the “Jane Black” which was bound for America. The first in a series of tragic events aboard this vessel was the death of a passenger by another passenger on board. After 37 days at sea a violent storm sent the “Jane Black” to the bottom of the Atlantic, only the remote chance of a passing ship saved the crew and passengers from an obvious fate.


Commissary wall, Fort Larned, Ks.




The rescue ship landed in Galloway, Ireland, which meant America, would have to wait. Next we find him aboard another vessel bound for Calcutta, there, he was offered a position as Chief of the Native Police, which he declined. While in Calcutta, he had a narrow escape of death from Cholera. Only with the dedication of one native woman doctor was he able to survive.




A short time later, in the same area, he began to learn the trade of manufacturing paper. Later, he boarded another ship which took him to the West Indies and finally to America. Arriving in Baltimore, and then to Buffalo, New York to apply his new talent.





It seems the beginning of the Civil War and military life would prove to be John McLaughlin true calling. Joining the United States Navy he was soon assigned to the “USS Virginia” which was preparing for the war. For some reason he received a transfer to the “USS Ida.” This man-of-war was assisting other ships in the taking of seaports in Alabama and distinguished herself in the capture of the Confederate ship “Southern Republic.”




One day as the “Ida” was sailing from Fort Blakely, she struck a sea mine and in John McLaughlin words “Blew into a thousand pieces.” Most of the crew were killed outright, however, John was blown overboard into the water and managed to hold on to a floating timber until rescued by the “USS Tallahatche.” The same ship picked up only one other survivor.





After his discharge finding work was almost impossible, so John re-enlisted in the army and was assigned to Company B, of the 3rd Regiment of Infantry, and posted to Fort Larned, Kansas. Researching John, the stone, and the building would calculate to the year 1866. John McLaughlin’s career in the army spans a little over 12 years. Transferring to the 6th Cavalry sometime in early 1870 and then re-enlisting in the 8th Cavalry by 1874.





He recalls his most terrifying experience fighting Indians while carrying dispatches with five others to another post. “We were attacked by about 130 Indians, we made breastwork out of our horses and when forced back we took cover behind two of our fallen comrades who had just been killed. When all hope was lost, we were saved by the arrival of another troop of Cavalry.”





McLaughlin retired from the army in 1877 and lived an active life to the end, attending reunions and lodge meetings where it was said he was the center of attention. John died on October 6, 1907 at 4:30 pm at Fort Randall, where he spent most of his twilight years.





1867 and 1868 were Fort Larned's most consequential years. In the spring of 1867, General Hancock blundered into war with the Cheyenne, a season of fighting known as Hancock's War. That conflict ended with the pivotal Medicine Lodge Treaty in October, 1867, which Fort Larned supplied. The following year, the gifts promised by the treaty were distributed at Fort Larned.





Old Fort Larned was used as a film location in the recent film The Only Good Indian, with Wes Sudi, they also filmed along the Smoky at Monument Rock. Not a bad movie, kind of shows a different perspective. And if your a fan of the prairie the scenery in it is grand!



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Old 07-25-2012, 05:49 PM   #238
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Signature on the trail of History

William Clark's signature:



Clark wrote in his journal about scratching his name and the date on a weird rock ledge he called Pompy's Pillar (or Pompey's Rock). 17 yrs later a trapper decided to search out the signature and found and further documented it's location. The rock is now a Montana State Park. Stairway to the Clark signature is at top right side of picture.



another closer pic of signature:



The L & C Journals mentioned around 20 places that they left their initials, but most were in trees that are most likely long gone. Lewis even had a branding iron that he heated up and marked trees along their route. His branding iron was found in a creek in Oregon and is presently in a museum in Portland, OR.
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Old 07-25-2012, 05:57 PM   #239
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Awesome LC!
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Old 07-25-2012, 06:04 PM   #240
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Yea thanks have changed.

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Awesome LC!
Things have changed.
I left my signature on a restroom wall in Saigon>



For about 100 yrs the only positive artifacts of L & C were this signature, Lewis' compass,
and their Journals.
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