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Old 07-11-2013, 02:35 PM   #1
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Known issues, problems, commons mods Husaberg FE390 FE450 FE570 70 degrees

Known issues and problems Husaberg FE390 FE450 FE570 70 degreees

Originally started this thread on unofficial husaberg but it got cluttered with side tracked discussions and couldn't revise the original post to keep all the tips in one spot. Thanks to the many inmates on that forum who provided much of the original information.

First up, this is a VERY comprehensive list and some guys have read it and said they didn't realise the 70 degree Bergs had so many issues... the thing is you can easily draw up a similar list for a DRZ400 which actually has issues that can destroy an engine, unlike a Berg! So read it in context - this list is very typical of almost any bike. It's more for owners who want to fully prep their bike.

These 2009 to 2012 bergs won a swag of awards. The levels of awesomeness involved far outweigh the known issues with great handling and suspension, flat power curve and adjustable ignition mapping, excellent reliability, decent 1.4 liter oil capacity, hot looks and a wide ratio six speed box to suit all kinds of riding. The vast majority of owners love their bikes to bits. Once you get the two main issues fixed (fuel pump on earlier models, correct gague of fuel filter mesh) these 70 degree Bergs have a tendency to last for ages before any major engine is needed, some have gone for 40,000km with no engine work done (examples here).

Generally there were only two major known issues for earlier models, the fuel pump and the fuel filters. If you buy a secondhand berg it's very likely that both of these will be fixed already. Any other issues are very small and just typical of any bike. We'll start with those two issues...

Dodgy fuel pump on pre-Oct 2011 models: All good on bikes made after that date. Only a possible issue if buying a secondhand Berg and it hasn't been replaced yet... although I assume if it has lasted a few years then it's probably all good or the original owner's fitted the new one. There's a thread around somewhere on Unofficial Husaberg about identifying if you have the original crap pump or it has been replaced.

Mesh too fine on pre-2012 inline fuel filters: Pre-2012 models had too fine a screen which was prone to blocking, but Husaberg have now got the correct gague mesh in the 2012 models sent to the dealers (assuming the dealer did actually fit them!). Owners of earlier models just removed the screen completely but ran the risk of crap clogign up the fuel injection. Also, the older filters would swell and restrict fuel when they heated up (easy fix is fitting a Can-am fuel filter apparently). A fuel filter sock is a common mod... sits under your fuel cap in the opening to the fuel tank and should lengthen the life and service intervals of your fuel injection.

Poorly routed exhaust: Earlier models were known for melting pants and boots occaionally. The 2012 has some shields and plastic guards to resolve these some of this, but still none on the forward part of the pipe, apparently some riders are still melting their pants on this. An aftermarket pipe lessens the issue as the bike is less restricted so the pipe is cooler. If it's a concern, wrap some muffler insulation around the offending parts, stick reflective heat tape on the bottom of the fuel tank, buy a universal heat shield or just make your own with some alloy plate and hose clamps that have a threaded hole in the bracket to allow bolting your home built exhaust shield in place.

No kickstart: Well worth replacing the battery with a Yuasa or top shelf battery at the first sign of problems, and carry around a set of mini jump leads. Or pay through the teeth to have a kickstart fitted.

Premature wear of countershaft All KTM dirt bikes (and therefore these Bergs) can wear the countershaft splines prematurely, especially if used on bitumen or for adventure riding... the splines have flogged out on some bikes in these conditions in less than 20,000km. Less of an issue with dirt riding as dirt in effect provides some cushioning through the drive train. If adventure riding or road riding at times, there are aftermarket front sprocket holders like the Dirt Tricks one that hold the sprocket more firmly to limit wear, plus you can fit a cush drive hub to limit wear. Read more here. here is one proposed fix.

Twitchy at speed: There is a slight rear weight bias due to the 70 degree engine. This and the geometry of the bike make it like to turn but can be a handful at speed. You can drop the forks through the triple clamps a bit for more stability but then it seems to do front end wash outs more. Some ideas here are steering dampers if doing a a lot of high speed riding, and if going a bigger fuel tank consider the safari tank before the under seat tank to keep the weight forward. Also if carrying extras consider putting them in a tank bag up front instead of a tail bag.

Electrical wiring Disconnect the fuel breather from the frame and run the cable harness under it as it will rub through at some point (see pic here). some feel the wiring behind the headlight is a bit messy and can rub on the steering head stem, bend the plate of connectors there for a little more clearance (see pic here). worth keeping an eye on.

35W headlight: Typical weak light as with any dirt bike. You wouldn't want to ride after sunset with the stock candle, you can get a marginal improvement with a Philips 12v 45W/40W BA20D, or go an aftermarket headlight like the Trail Tech X2 seems common, or the el cheapo H4 car bulb mod.

Sticky clutch when cold: Right off the dealership floor, the clutch won't disengage when cold so you have to push the bike before engaging first gear. It's okay once the engine is fully warmed up but still makes finding neutral a bitch when the engine is running. Common with all the KTMs and many European bikes so hesitate to call it a problem a such.

Touchy throttle: Like a lot of fuel-injected bikes, some riders might find the instant response a hassle in gnarly tight terrain but easily fixed with a G2 throttle cam or putting the ignition mapping to the mild no.1 setting, or both. I did the el cheapo mod and took apart the throttle housing and created my own cam by getting a Stanley knife into the plastic the cable runs along. It's worked a treat.

Weephole mod: There is a weep hole around the water pump area that slowly fills up with crud and can eventually do some damage. Problem is they didn't relocate the hole when they swivelled the engine 70 degrees so the hole faces the front! Basic mod to fix this on this thread. You can buy a kit here or just get the parts at a model aeroplane store.

Thermostat rubbing on the frame: One rider said this was an issue on all 09 10 models were the same but it was easily solved with making a bracket for it. No one else reports it as an issue though.

Decals don't want to stay on the bike: Seems to happen a lot, and it's a warranty claim so if you bought new check your decals before your six month warranty is up.



Suggested mods and maintenance stuff

Got these in a separate section now as guys were looking at the length of the list and thinking the Bergs had 29,304 known issues.

Radiator fan: Riders in gnarly stuff during hot weather occasionally report boiling radiators and usually fit a KTM fan. A lot of riders don't have this issue so would suggest only doing this if you regularly get the bike overheating. Personally I've never had this issue in sub-tropical Queensland and it gets bloody hot here.

Cleaning out the injectors: Pretty typical of any fuel-injected bike, you'll want to clean out the injectors at some point. hey can be cleaned by holding them open with a 9V battery and blowing compressed air in: It's another good reason to use the filter sock mentioned above in the fuel tank to get nice long service intervals.

If your small screen filter (the one who is next to the injector) is clogged up. just pull the hose, take the small screen filter from the injector bracket. and put it in the hose that you just pulled off. Keep it there with your hands, or tighten the hose clamp around it, and then use your fuelpump to blow fuel backwards the filter when pressing the start button. Voila, it would get you home and if it occurs a few more times then you would have to get home and clean the hole fuel line but that is another subject. this goes for all fuel injected bikes with the same construction. (thanks to blutor for this tip).

No ignition mapping switch: A cool feature is adjusting the ignition mapping from mild, standard to wild. But you have to buy this poorly designed OEM switch for $60 from the dealer when it probably costs them $5 a pop. A clear case of just milking the consumer for a bit more dough. Trail Tech and 70 Degrees do much better designed mapping switches for around the $120 mark. Personally I can't say it makes a huge difference though!

Auxiliary wiring: There's an AUX connector just under the battery cover. You can buy the required connector to plug into this from BMW (Part # 83300413585) for about $30. Typical Beemer price for a $1 piece of plastic.

Safety recall on handlebar clamps: If your clamps do not have a single punch mark just aft of the front bolt, the manufacturer says you have an unsafe motorcycle and that you should not ride it until the replacement clamps are installed.

Flippy floppy rear tail section: This usually breaks within 10 seconds or 30 mins of hitting dirt, and has to be replaced with a tail tidy or remove all together and fit some flush mount indicators. If you want to keep the tail section, take the indicators off, drill holes in the plastic just under the rear fender and mount them there. Some ideas for reinforcing the tail section here.

Rear sprocket bolts: These are known to come loose. At the very least get some Loctite on them, or ideally fit Nyloc bolts as well.

Short radiator overflow hose Dealer suggested taking a longer radiator hose & running it down side of motor to overflow underneath to prevent any excess coolant staining the motor. I've done it but never had problems overheating though. (Have radiator fan installed) - blakduk


Emission gear: If your Berg came with emission gear and you are taking it all off, there is an evaporative control canister under the right rear fender cover that is plumbed into the rocker cover on the engine and the fuel cap.

Steering stop bolts: Interesting idea, you can increase or decrease your turning circle. May as well go for the maximum possible and just ensure your wiring and cables are okay on full lock.

Diagnostics chart: Not really a mod but worth considering. If your dashboard lights start flashing then your Berg is trying to tell you something is wrong. I made up a little PDF here worth printing out and carrying in the wallet or tool kit.

Exposed radiator hose?: Some owners think the radiator hose on the left hand side of the engine is too exposed and could hook up on stuff. One possible solution is make your own guard that an also making cleaning your bike easier after the ride (see pic here).

ANYONE GOT STUFF TO ADD?
As mentioned, I couldn't edit my original post on the other forum to keep all the info collated. If you've got any tips I can just add them in.

B1 screwed with this post 06-13-2014 at 02:45 PM
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Old 07-11-2013, 03:01 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B1 View Post
Known issues, problems, commons mods Husaberg FE390 FE450 FE570 70 degreees

Originally started this thread on unofficial husaberg but it got cluttered with side tracked discussions and couldn't revise the original post to keep all the tips in one spot. Thanks to the many inmates on that forum who provided much of the original information.

These 2009 to 2012 bergs won a swag of awards. The levels of awesomeness involved far outweigh the known issues with great handling and suspension, flat power curve and adjustable ignition mapping, excellent reliability, decent 1.4 liter oil capacity, hot looks and a wide ratio six speed box to suit all kinds of riding. The vast majority of owners love their bikes to bits. Once you get the glaring issues fixed (fuel pump on earlier models, correct guage of fuel filter mesh) these 70 degree Bergs have a tendency to last for ages before any major engine is needed (examples here).


Dodgy fuel pump on pre-Oct 2011 models: All good on bikes made after that date. Only a possible issue if buying a secondhand Berg and it hasn't been replaced yet... although I assume if it has lasted a few years then it's probably all good. There's a thread around somewhere on Unofficial Husaberg about identifying if you have the original crap pump or it has been replaced.

Mesh too fine on pre-2012 inline fuel filters: Pre-2012 models had too fine a screen which was prone to blocking, but Husaberg have now got the correct guage mesh in the 2012 models sent to the dealers (assuming the dealer did actually fit them!). Owners of earlier models just removed the screen completely but ran the risk of crap clogign up the fuel injection. Also, the older filters would swell and restrict fuel when they heated up (easy fix is fitting a Can-am fuel filter apparently). A fuel filter sock is a common mod... sits under your fuel cap in the opening to the fuel tank and should lengthen the life and service intervals of your fuel injection.

Premature wear of countershaft splines: Seems to mainly be an issue with excessive road or adventure riding use (see pics and suggested solutions here and also here). this is not confined to bergs, it tends to be an issue with KTMs as well which of course share about 80% parts in common with the bergs. i'm currently trialling a home made washer that seems to be holding the sprocket very firmly to lessen wear, will report on this later if successful.

Poorly routed exhaust: Earlier models were known for melting pants, boots and even causing fuel to boil in the tank where it comes close to the exhaust (at low fuel levels)! The 2012 has some shields and plastic guards to resolve these some of this, but still none on the forward part of the pipe, apparently some riders are still melting their pants on this. An aftermarket pipe lessens the issue as the bike is less restricted so the pipe is cooler (e.g. I've never had the fuel boil in my tank at low levels). If it's a concern, wrap some muffler insulation around the offending parts, stick reflective heat tape on the bottom of the fuel tank, buy a universal heat shield or just make your own with some alloy plate and hose clamps that have a threaded hole in the bracket to allow bolting your home built exhaust shield in place.

Flippy floppy rear tail section: This usually breaks within 10 seconds or 30 mins of hitting dirt, and has to be replaced with a tail tidy or remove all together and fit some flush mount indicators. If you want to keep the tail section, take the indicators off, drill holes in the plastic just under the rear fender and mount them there. Some ideas for reinforcing the tail section here.

Radiator fan: Riders in gnarly stuff during hot weather report boiling radiators and usually fit a KTM fan. A lot of riders don't have this issue so would suggest only doing this if you regularly get the bike overheating.

Weephole mod: There is a weep hole around the water pump area that slowly fills up with crud and can eventually do some damage. Problem is they didn't relocate the hole when they swivelled the engine 70 degrees so the hole faces the front! Basic mod to fix this on this thread. You can buy a kit here or just get the parts at a model aeroplane store.

No kickstart: Poor oversight by Husaberg or short sighted cost saving, and that compression makes her tricky to bump start. Well worth replacing the battery with a Yuasa or top shelf battery at the first sign of problems, and carry around a set of mini jump leads. Or pay through the teeth to have a kickstart fitted.

Twitchy at speed: There is a slight rear weight bias due to the 70 degree engine. This and the geometry of the bike make it like to turn but can be a handful at speed. You can drop the forks through the triple clamps a bit for more stability but then it seems to do front end wash outs more. Some ideas here are steering dampers if doing a a lot of high speed riding, and if going a bigger fuel tank consider the safari tank before the under seat tank to keep the weight forward. Also if carrying extras consider putting them in a tank bag up front instead of a tail bag.

Electrical wiring Disconnect the fuel breather from the frame and run the cable harness under it as it will rub through at some point (see pic here). some feel the wiring behind the headlight is a bit messy and can rub on the steering head stem, bend the plate of connectors there for a little more clearance (see pic here). worth keeping an eye on.

35W headlight: You wouldn't want to ride after sunset with the stock candle, you can get a marginal improvement with a Philips 12v 45W/40W BA20D, or go an aftermarket headlight like the Trail Tech X2 seems common, or the el cheapo H4 car bulb mod.

Rear sprocket bolts: These are known to come loose. At the very least get some Loctite on them, or ideally fit Nyloc bolts as well.

Fuel cap: Poor design, if you just push the logical place on the tab to release it usually only half releases. You need to apply pressure both sides of the breather hose to get a proper release, and it still isn't all that easy then. Some riders reckon you need to remove the ball in the tube but I've had no issues.

Exposed radiator hose?: Some owners think the radiator hose on the left hand side of the engine is too exposed and could hook up on stuff. One possible solution is make your own guard that an also making cleaning your bike easier after the ride (see pic here).

Sticky clutch when cold: Right off the dealership floor, the clutch won't disengage when cold so you have to push the bike before engaging first gear. It's okay once the engine is fully warmed up but still makes finding neutral a bitch when the engine is running.

Touchy throttle: Like a lot of fuel-injected bikes, some riders might find the instant response a hassle in gnarly tight terrain but easily fixed with a G2 throttle cam or putting the ignition mapping to the mild no.1 setting, or both. I did the el cheapo mod and took apart the throttle housing and created my own cam by getting a Stanley knife into the plastic the cable runs along. It's worked a treat.

Thermostat rubbing on the frame: One rider said this was an issue on all 09 10 models were the same but it was easily solved with making a bracket for it.

Decals don't want to stay on the bike: Seems to happen a lot, and it's a warranty claim so if you bought new check your decals before your six month warranty is up.

No ignition mapping switch: A cool feature is adjusting the ignition mapping from mild, standard to wild. But you have to buy this poorly designed OEM switch for $60 from the dealer when it probably costs them $5 a pop. A clear case of just milking the consumer for a bit more dough. Trail Tech and 70 Degrees do much better designed mapping switches for around the $120 mark.

Auxiliary wiring: There's an AUX connector just under the battery cover. You can buy the required connector to plug into this from BMW (Part # 83300413585) for about $30. Typical Beemer price for a $1 piece of plastic.

Safety recall on handlebar clamps: If your clamps do not have a single punch mark just aft of the front bolt, the manufacturer says you have an unsafe motorcycle and that you should not ride it until the replacement clamps are installed.

Emission gear: If your Berg came with emission gear and you are taking it all off, there is an evaporative control canister under the right rear fender cover that is plumbed into the rocker cover on the engine and the fuel cap.

Steering stop bolts: Interesting idea, you can increase or decrease your turning circle. May as well go for the maximum possible and just ensure your wiring and cables are okay on full lock.

Diagnostics chart: Not really a mod but worth considering. If your dashboard lights start flashing then your Berg is trying to tell you something is wrong. I made up a little PDF here worth printing out and carrying in the wallet or tool kit.

ANYONE GOT STUFF TO ADD?
As mentioned, I couldn't edit my original post on the other forum to keep all the info collated. If you've got any tips I can just add them in.

KTM fixed all these problems by scapping the bike I believe.
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Old 07-11-2013, 03:27 PM   #3
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nah,,

I have ridden the new KTM350exc back to back with my 2010 Berg 390 and my berg is much better. IMO

how's things Podge?

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KTM fixed all these problems by scapping the bike I believe.
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Old 07-11-2013, 03:31 PM   #4
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That's a big list, but apart from the fuel pump, I would call it a list of miner annoyances...

Now you will have idiots who have never owned, or owned and mistreated there euro dirt bikes claiming this threads existence proves all non Jap bikes are unreliable.
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Old 07-11-2013, 03:44 PM   #5
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dunno trev, i reckon its a pretty standard-sized list for most bikes. still working on those kato back flips? that one was pretty impressive!
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Old 07-11-2013, 05:18 PM   #6
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how's things Podge?[/QUOTE]


Good mate how about you?
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Old 07-11-2013, 06:22 PM   #7
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Bloody hell!
And here's me getn a bit pissed coz my Vmax blew the dogs on 2nd gear after 10 years of drag-racing. Jeez, even my little Piaggio has done more gravel than half the distance of these things.

I've had a Kato, and after the novelty of a big booming single with grunt wore off, the thing was still a Kaboom at the end of the day. Looks like Husabang has been taking notes.

Will the 570SM still light up coming out of roundabouts? Can I still have one?
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Old 07-11-2013, 08:13 PM   #8
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I have to admit these bikes piss me off with their problems.
only problem mine has ever had is getting the fuel cap off sometimes. ;)
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Old 07-12-2013, 01:11 AM   #9
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Sell it Cruz, I dont want to have to keep towing you out with a trouble free 690.

Quote:
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I have to admit these bikes piss me off with their problems.
I still have trouble now and again with getting the fuel cap off. ;)
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Old 07-12-2013, 01:18 AM   #10
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Sell it Cruz, I dont want to have to keep towing you out with a trouble free 690.
Hey cruz famous last words hey
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Old 07-12-2013, 01:53 AM   #11
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If they didn't have so many issues this one would probably be a good pick up

http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item...obalID=EBAY-AU
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Old 07-12-2013, 03:24 AM   #12
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Hey cruz famous last words hey
You should never utter words like that, bit like talking about getting punctures.
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Old 07-12-2013, 03:54 PM   #13
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Sell it Cruz, I dont want to have to keep towing you out with a trouble free 690.

Where is this mythical trouble free 690?
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Old 07-12-2013, 04:17 PM   #14
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Where is this mythical trouble free 690?

In the shop getting repaired!
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Old 07-12-2013, 04:18 PM   #15
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Excellent list, agree with all except my motor & throttle are fine. (Try stock 990 for jerky). Some e.g. 'twitchy', c/shaft, h/light not really relevant for more hardcore off-road, more problem for ADv-ing. Also have never had overheating fuel & have had very hot single track situations.....

Add: Short radiator overflow hose. My dealer suggested taking a longer radiator hose & running it down side of motor to overflow underneath to prevent any excess coolant staining the motor. I've done it but never had problems overheating though. (Have radiator fan installed)

Quote:
Originally Posted by B1 View Post
Known issues, problems, commons mods Husaberg FE390 FE450 FE570 70 degreees

Originally started this thread on unofficial husaberg but it got cluttered with side tracked discussions and couldn't revise the original post to keep all the tips in one spot. Thanks to the many inmates on that forum who provided much of the original information.

These 2009 to 2012 bergs won a swag of awards. The levels of awesomeness involved far outweigh the known issues with great handling and suspension, flat power curve and adjustable ignition mapping, excellent reliability, decent 1.4 liter oil capacity, hot looks and a wide ratio six speed box to suit all kinds of riding. The vast majority of owners love their bikes to bits. Once you get the glaring issues fixed (fuel pump on earlier models, correct guage of fuel filter mesh) these 70 degree Bergs have a tendency to last for ages before any major engine is needed (examples here).


Dodgy fuel pump on pre-Oct 2011 models: All good on bikes made after that date. Only a possible issue if buying a secondhand Berg and it hasn't been replaced yet... although I assume if it has lasted a few years then it's probably all good. There's a thread around somewhere on Unofficial Husaberg about identifying if you have the original crap pump or it has been replaced.

Mesh too fine on pre-2012 inline fuel filters: Pre-2012 models had too fine a screen which was prone to blocking, but Husaberg have now got the correct guage mesh in the 2012 models sent to the dealers (assuming the dealer did actually fit them!). Owners of earlier models just removed the screen completely but ran the risk of crap clogign up the fuel injection. Also, the older filters would swell and restrict fuel when they heated up (easy fix is fitting a Can-am fuel filter apparently). A fuel filter sock is a common mod... sits under your fuel cap in the opening to the fuel tank and should lengthen the life and service intervals of your fuel injection.

Premature wear of countershaft splines: Seems to mainly be an issue with excessive road or adventure riding use (see pics and suggested solutions here and also here). this is not confined to bergs, it tends to be an issue with KTMs as well which of course share about 80% parts in common with the bergs. i'm currently trialling a home made washer that seems to be holding the sprocket very firmly to lessen wear, will report on this later if successful.

Poorly routed exhaust: Earlier models were known for melting pants, boots and even causing fuel to boil in the tank where it comes close to the exhaust (at low fuel levels)! The 2012 has some shields and plastic guards to resolve these some of this, but still none on the forward part of the pipe, apparently some riders are still melting their pants on this. An aftermarket pipe lessens the issue as the bike is less restricted so the pipe is cooler (e.g. I've never had the fuel boil in my tank at low levels). If it's a concern, wrap some muffler insulation around the offending parts, stick reflective heat tape on the bottom of the fuel tank, buy a universal heat shield or just make your own with some alloy plate and hose clamps that have a threaded hole in the bracket to allow bolting your home built exhaust shield in place.

Flippy floppy rear tail section: This usually breaks within 10 seconds or 30 mins of hitting dirt, and has to be replaced with a tail tidy or remove all together and fit some flush mount indicators. If you want to keep the tail section, take the indicators off, drill holes in the plastic just under the rear fender and mount them there. Some ideas for reinforcing the tail section here.

Radiator fan: Riders in gnarly stuff during hot weather report boiling radiators and usually fit a KTM fan. A lot of riders don't have this issue so would suggest only doing this if you regularly get the bike overheating.

Weephole mod: There is a weep hole around the water pump area that slowly fills up with crud and can eventually do some damage. Problem is they didn't relocate the hole when they swivelled the engine 70 degrees so the hole faces the front! Basic mod to fix this on this thread. You can buy a kit here or just get the parts at a model aeroplane store.

No kickstart: Poor oversight by Husaberg or short sighted cost saving, and that compression makes her tricky to bump start. Well worth replacing the battery with a Yuasa or top shelf battery at the first sign of problems, and carry around a set of mini jump leads. Or pay through the teeth to have a kickstart fitted.

Twitchy at speed: There is a slight rear weight bias due to the 70 degree engine. This and the geometry of the bike make it like to turn but can be a handful at speed. You can drop the forks through the triple clamps a bit for more stability but then it seems to do front end wash outs more. Some ideas here are steering dampers if doing a a lot of high speed riding, and if going a bigger fuel tank consider the safari tank before the under seat tank to keep the weight forward. Also if carrying extras consider putting them in a tank bag up front instead of a tail bag.

Electrical wiring Disconnect the fuel breather from the frame and run the cable harness under it as it will rub through at some point (see pic here). some feel the wiring behind the headlight is a bit messy and can rub on the steering head stem, bend the plate of connectors there for a little more clearance (see pic here). worth keeping an eye on.

35W headlight: You wouldn't want to ride after sunset with the stock candle, you can get a marginal improvement with a Philips 12v 45W/40W BA20D, or go an aftermarket headlight like the Trail Tech X2 seems common, or the el cheapo H4 car bulb mod.

Rear sprocket bolts: These are known to come loose. At the very least get some Loctite on them, or ideally fit Nyloc bolts as well.

Fuel cap: Poor design, if you just push the logical place on the tab to release it usually only half releases. You need to apply pressure both sides of the breather hose to get a proper release, and it still isn't all that easy then. Some riders reckon you need to remove the ball in the tube but I've had no issues.

Exposed radiator hose?: Some owners think the radiator hose on the left hand side of the engine is too exposed and could hook up on stuff. One possible solution is make your own guard that an also making cleaning your bike easier after the ride (see pic here).

Sticky clutch when cold: Right off the dealership floor, the clutch won't disengage when cold so you have to push the bike before engaging first gear. It's okay once the engine is fully warmed up but still makes finding neutral a bitch when the engine is running.

Touchy throttle: Like a lot of fuel-injected bikes, some riders might find the instant response a hassle in gnarly tight terrain but easily fixed with a G2 throttle cam or putting the ignition mapping to the mild no.1 setting, or both. I did the el cheapo mod and took apart the throttle housing and created my own cam by getting a Stanley knife into the plastic the cable runs along. It's worked a treat.

Thermostat rubbing on the frame: One rider said this was an issue on all 09 10 models were the same but it was easily solved with making a bracket for it.

Decals don't want to stay on the bike: Seems to happen a lot, and it's a warranty claim so if you bought new check your decals before your six month warranty is up.

No ignition mapping switch: A cool feature is adjusting the ignition mapping from mild, standard to wild. But you have to buy this poorly designed OEM switch for $60 from the dealer when it probably costs them $5 a pop. A clear case of just milking the consumer for a bit more dough. Trail Tech and 70 Degrees do much better designed mapping switches for around the $120 mark.

Auxiliary wiring: There's an AUX connector just under the battery cover. You can buy the required connector to plug into this from BMW (Part # 83300413585) for about $30. Typical Beemer price for a $1 piece of plastic.

Safety recall on handlebar clamps: If your clamps do not have a single punch mark just aft of the front bolt, the manufacturer says you have an unsafe motorcycle and that you should not ride it until the replacement clamps are installed.

Emission gear: If your Berg came with emission gear and you are taking it all off, there is an evaporative control canister under the right rear fender cover that is plumbed into the rocker cover on the engine and the fuel cap.

Steering stop bolts: Interesting idea, you can increase or decrease your turning circle. May as well go for the maximum possible and just ensure your wiring and cables are okay on full lock.

Diagnostics chart: Not really a mod but worth considering. If your dashboard lights start flashing then your Berg is trying to tell you something is wrong. I made up a little PDF here worth printing out and carrying in the wallet or tool kit.

ANYONE GOT STUFF TO ADD?
As mentioned, I couldn't edit my original post on the other forum to keep all the info collated. If you've got any tips I can just add them in.
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