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Old 07-14-2012, 12:40 AM   #781
ClifNotes
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I know I shouldn't... but I'm going to the bar to look for Laura.

She told me I'd find her there. She also said she was tired, so maybe she went home already.

Can't take more than a few minutes right?
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Old 07-14-2012, 01:47 AM   #782
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Darrick the gas station guy gave me directions to "the bar". It's off grid. My GPS doesn't show a bar for a 60 mile radius.

Anyway, I was lucky and Laura was still there. She was really nice to me. Had I lived here, I would have definitely spent more time with her.

Met her sister Becca, Becca's boyfriend James. Quinton who says he wants to work every day - not just outside winter season vacuuming construction projects. Allen who says his work is to pee in the bathroom.

James bowed down to me when he discovered I rode a k16. But he said that bike isn't for "rookies". When I left the bar, I could hear him telling the story of the "guy who just started riding and has a bmw" to his buddies. "Noooo way!" They said. (Yessss way, yes way... the fun is in the details boys, at advrider).

Want to see Laura? Of course you do...

ClifNotes screwed with this post 07-14-2012 at 01:58 AM
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Old 07-14-2012, 01:59 AM   #783
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advrider friends, meet Laura. Laura, meet clif's friends...



If any of you riders meet her, be very polite and give her a big tip. She makes killer magaritas. Of course, I know this through Bill. I don't drink any alcohol.
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Old 07-14-2012, 02:01 AM   #784
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Maria!

I hope you read this...

Don't worry what your parents think. You'll have a great time! You can post all your photos and experiences here. And your parents can follow vicariously. Or... they can buy a couple new bikes and REALLY follow!
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Old 07-14-2012, 04:02 AM   #785
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This is surreal in so many levels.

Clif, a word of advice from a fellow rider who fell in the same trap years ago (and have the scars to prove it): I detect a "change of gears" in your attitude towards riding across the thread. It changed from a healthy dose of respect towards the activity to a increasing level of arrogance in the recent posts. "I learned fast", "I'm already proficent", "I'm in total control of the machine", "my mentor/god/angel/whatever is protecting me", etc thoughts have no place in the mind of someone who is riding for less than two months (regardless the number of highway miles). You are making lots of beginner mistakes, don't fool yourself.

Your case seems like a textbook case of "I know it all" that happens at 6-12 months of riding - except that it's happening earlier. I got too cocky too soon, and fell down hard. You are in the same path.
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Old 07-14-2012, 04:26 AM   #786
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Originally Posted by ClifNotes View Post
Why did God create mosquitos?

To bug you...
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Old 07-14-2012, 06:36 AM   #787
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Stay cool

Clif and Bill-- to stay cooler on the next warm day, soak your tee-shirt in the sink. Ring out some of the excess water and slip it on right before leaving. You will have your own AC for 2 hours! Repeat when necessary. Good luck.

Besure to wear your jacket over the tee to prevent rapid evaporation.
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Old 07-14-2012, 06:56 AM   #788
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Reminder of the day ---- SLOW DOWN!!!!
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Old 07-14-2012, 07:09 AM   #789
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And I like your comment because I tend to go fast.

Brian - which city are you in? Have you been to Logan?
When I say I go faster, I mean that I go about 2-5 mph faster, that is all. Just enough to stay out of the very large blind spots of cars and trucks. When you drive a cage you feel your blind spot is small, but that is when you are looking for other cars. When you think about a motorcycle, they can hide really easily, even to a smart car, or a mini, huge blind spots you can easily put a big bike like yours in.

Logan, oh yes, several times. My wife has family just outside of Logan, and we used to travel through there to get up to my wife's family home.

As far as my area, I am about 45 min south of Salt Lake City.


Clif stay safe, and GET MORE SLEEP! You should not be up this late when you are going to ride several hundred miles the next day on a motorcycle with more power than some small cars. (Please) (oh and please do not touch any wild animals, or swerve into oncoming traffic. You can never forget you are on a motorcycle.) Statistically MOST motorcycle accidents happen to guys who have ridden for two years, and up to five years. Before that riders are typically still very nervous, and after five years they have learned (often the hard way) to have respect for the bike. Remember Bill said you have over 5k miles which is about twice as many (perhaps more) than most guys get in a year. Ergo you are entering that cocky 2 year mark, in a sense, so respect your bike please.)

Regards
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:30 AM   #790
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Tightening up

Cliff, using your ESA makes the frame more rigid and allows your to ride a little more secure in tight turns. Placing it in two up mode does that as well as the sport mode. Helps to keep you from bottoming out on rough roads.

Bud
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:33 AM   #791
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Safety and the Art of Motorcycle Riding

Safety, whether it is working with tools, riding a motorcycld, driving a caxr or even dealing with other people. is an attitude of mind. When I start with the mind-set that I am immortal, I am almost guaranteed to get into trouble. It is the mind set, the attitude, the level of concern/caution with which I approach daily life and my acxtivities that will most influence my conduct and, to that extent the outcome of the activity.
For some, caution becomes a way of life, concern over potential consequences is such an overriding factor in their daily lives that they do almost nothing. It's the old "if I get out of bed I begin running risks" type of thinkiong. Carried to extremes there are some who can't even leave their homes for fear of disaster. The other extreme comes from those who gratefully clean out the gene pool by their reckless conduct. What we are looking for is a healthy balance that is usuallyl a moving point depending on the activity.
Clif, in his riding, has passed that point where everything is a challenge and he is overly cautious. And yes, he is at that point where, having "mastered" some of the basics of riding, he now feels he has "mastered" the motorcycle experience. We all are trying to pull him along, gently, and helpl his survival I(and help the gene pool in general) by urging caution and counseling discretion. Please keep your excellent thoughts coming on this subject. We both need them.
But attitude also goes to what he has done, what I am doing and what we all do in our daily lives. For those who believe they would like to make a similar trip, or any trip that stretches their comfort level, it is the attitude you bring to the project that will make it happen or leave it as an unfulfilled dream. Your dreams can become realities. People do what they want to do. Saying that "I want to do .........." doesn't make it happen. The choices we make dictate the lives we live. Clif's choice to come on this ride, to get that particular motorcycle and to ride as he has been riding, these choices are the result of the attitude toward life Clif has. That attitude is one of willingness to explore the boundaries of his own imagination, to push his comfort envelope and to expand his personal horizons. Each of us can think of a hundred reasons not to do something that is expanding. Take a chancde, with reasonable caution, and live the kind of life you believe you would like to live. The truth is, that the life I am living, the life Clif is living and the life each of you is living is the life we all have chosen to live.
Bill
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:42 AM   #792
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Safety, whether it is working with tools, riding a motorcycld, driving a caxr or even dealing with other people. is an attitude of mind. When I start with the mind-set that I am immortal, I am almost guaranteed to get into trouble. It is the mind set, the attitude, the level of concern/caution with which I approach daily life and my acxtivities that will most influence my conduct and, to that extent the outcome of the activity.
For some, caution becomes a way of life, concern over potential consequences is such an overriding factor in their daily lives that they do almost nothing. It's the old "if I get out of bed I begin running risks" type of thinkiong. Carried to extremes there are some who can't even leave their homes for fear of disaster. The other extreme comes from those who gratefully clean out the gene pool by their reckless conduct. What we are looking for is a healthy balance that is usuallyl a moving point depending on the activity.
Clif, in his riding, has passed that point where everything is a challenge and he is overly cautious. And yes, he is at that point where, having "mastered" some of the basics of riding, he now feels he has "mastered" the motorcycle experience. We all are trying to pull him along, gently, and helpl his survival I(and help the gene pool in general) by urging caution and counseling discretion. Please keep your excellent thoughts coming on this subject. We both need them.
But attitude also goes to what he has done, what I am doing and what we all do in our daily lives. For those who believe they would like to make a similar trip, or any trip that stretches their comfort level, it is the attitude you bring to the project that will make it happen or leave it as an unfulfilled dream. Your dreams can become realities. People do what they want to do. Saying that "I want to do .........." doesn't make it happen. The choices we make dictate the lives we live. Clif's choice to come on this ride, to get that particular motorcycle and to ride as he has been riding, these choices are the result of the attitude toward life Clif has. That attitude is one of willingness to explore the boundaries of his own imagination, to push his comfort envelope and to expand his personal horizons. Each of us can think of a hundred reasons not to do something that is expanding. Take a chancde, with reasonable caution, and live the kind of life you believe you would like to live. The truth is, that the life I am living, the life Clif is living and the life each of you is living is the life we all have chosen to live.
Bill
It's a comfort that Bill's posts balance out my own. If I made postings by myself, this RR would be a long, never ending series of wild creatures: the same types of animals taken at a thousand different places.

And you'd have to guess "which places" ?

Anyway - love the posts as usual.

I'm out to breakfast with Bill.

Oh ... and check this out...

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Old 07-14-2012, 09:51 AM   #793
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Cliff, using your ESA makes the frame more rigid and allows your to ride a little more secure in tight turns. Placing it in two up mode does that as well as the sport mode. Helps to keep you from bottoming out on rough roads.

Bud
Hi Bud,

Is ESA one of the options I can turn on from the menu?

I'll check it when I'm riding later.

And what is "two up mode" ?

I did bottom out a couple times on frost heaves - that means the bottom of my bike hit the road, right?

Thanks
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Old 07-14-2012, 10:36 AM   #794
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Hi Bud,

Is ESA one of the options I can turn on from the menu?

I'll check it when I'm riding later.

And what is "two up mode" ?

I did bottom out a couple times on frost heaves - that means the bottom of my bike hit the road, right?

Thanks

Two up means two riders, or when you ride with a passenger (or pillion) on the back.

If you bottomed out your bike did NOT hit the road, it just means that you compressed the shocks to their maximum compression. In essence the the springs got as short as possible, and bounced off of the bump stop. Not to worry if that happens. Obviously you want to avoid it, but it does happen to everyone.

Safe ride mate,
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Old 07-14-2012, 11:09 AM   #795
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Is ESA one of the options I can turn on from the menu?
ESA is "Electronic Suspension Adjustment", which is an option that you may have (probably have) on your K16GTL. Toggle through the menu, and you can choose the suspension to be Comfort/Normal/Sport. You can switch between those settings while on the fly, and the damping gets progressively stiffer, making the bike feel sportier, and more connected to the road. But the ride quality gets busier, and bumps are felt more, as you move toward the Sport setting.

When the bike is stopped, if you rotate the wheel in the menu further down, you can change the preload on the suspension to adjust for the number of riders and/or luggage. The choices are single rider, rider + luggage, and 2-up. Getting it set right puts the suspension in a better state to handle the road conditions.

On my GT, I generally keep it at Normal, and rider+luggage if I'm running either the side bags or the top case.
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