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Old 06-05-2014, 08:59 AM   #1
doggitter OP
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Mega size manuf. machines.

Anyone else here work with really big saws, lathes or mills?
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Old 06-05-2014, 09:15 AM   #2
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My lab used to be adjacent to a set of six 300 ton stamping presses. They would punch out 16 clutch core plates at a time, 3x / second, 24 hours per day. BOOM BOOM BOOM BOOM .... wreaked havoc on baselines.

Earplugs were, of course, required even to walk by them.
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Old 06-05-2014, 09:32 AM   #3
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my company has a CNC spin forge (2 actually ) to make seamless pressure vessels out of steel pipe , 12" outside diameter up to 24" OD. the heat treat furnace fits 4 tubes across by 40' long , and the quenching tank is big enough to do 2 tubes wide x 40ft.
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Old 06-05-2014, 10:15 AM   #4
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I operate a shutte six spindle lathe at work..I make fuel injector nozzles.
I'm guessing its around 20 feet long???
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Old 06-05-2014, 10:25 AM   #5
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We have three calibration load presses, 400,000, 1million pound and 2.25 million pound capacities. Not the largest calibration load presses / tooling out there, but they are quite big and heavy.

The largest calibration load press that I know of is a Baldwin 5 million pound unit, about 3 stories tall with a catwalk for service, etc. You can drive a large truck into the load area. It is owned by Lehigh Univ. Frtiz Eng Lab.

Here is a link that shows a little of it

http://library.lehigh.edu/omeka/exhibits/show/jfl/butm

We send instruments to them for testing when they are outside our capability.
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Old 06-05-2014, 10:43 AM   #6
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What do you consider really big. Most of the individual machines I work on are small, but some of the lines cover a lot of floor space.

One of the biggest I have heard of is at a place by the Nashville airport. It drills and rivets airplane wings, I think it's about 7 axis,
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Old 06-05-2014, 11:21 AM   #7
Buccleuch
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Long time ago.

I worked facilities and production support at a new plant where we manufactured parabolic microwave antennas, mounts, and associated RF feed assemblies and hardware. We were getting moved into the new facility, and I (licensed electrician) got to work with putting a lot of the production equipment and production lines together.

Biggest and most impressive piece was our "spin lathe," a purely custom-designed-and-built piece of equipment, where we formed the parabolic reflectors on cast iron forms, or "chucks," as we called 'em. The lathe was an immense 20-foot high "C" shape of cast iron box sections bolted together, with two movable tool plates driven with hydraulic motors and leadscrews over 12 feet long. Position resolvers on the tool plates gave the operator position information to 0.001". The chuck mounted in a horizontal attitude on a driver plate, and the primary drive was a 75hp DC voltage-ramp servo.

An aluminum "blank" would be dropped into position on the chuck and held in place with two-stage two-diameter coaxial hydraulic rams. A ball former would roll the aluminum down the curve of the chuck as the chuck spun at the defined rate for the antenna size. Then the edge would be rolled or formed to certain specifications, depending on the type of antenna being formed. Amazingly enough, the process was ALL manual, controlled by the lathe operator - there were no automated processes at all.

We manufactured antennas from 4ft to 15ft in diameter on that thing. The chuck for the 15-footer weighed over 10 tons, and was maneuvered back and forth from staging to production on a massive air-caster cradle. Once air was on, a 10-year-old boy could move it.

REALLY cool piece of equipment. When I was working with the crew of four building the thing (toolmaker, welder/mechanic, production engineer, and electrician - me), one morning I had my arms up to the elbows inside the back of the operator console, checking all the wiring from actuator controls to hydraulic solenoid valves to indicator lamps to pressure resolvers. Unbeknownst to me, a staffer from our company's news magazine came up behind me to document the event of the second spin lathe coming into production (one was at our main plant near Chicago).

*POOOOF* goes the flash on the guy's camera.

I could've killed him.

W.A.
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Old 06-05-2014, 11:31 AM   #8
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I work with 350ton die cast machines, does that count?
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Old 06-05-2014, 12:07 PM   #9
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Thanks guys. Like hearing about the big, uncommon stuff. The hole in our floor getting filled for the VTL showing up soon made me think of it. The other out of the ordinary machines here are a Hyd-Mec 40" metal band saw and a Gisholt tracer lathe with 65' of bed, 19" spindle hole and +\- 48" swing. The drive on it wasn't too cool so we dumped the electro-magnet clutch in favor of a vfd combined with the gearing.
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Old 06-05-2014, 01:25 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlowBee View Post
My lab used to be adjacent to a set of six 300 ton stamping presses. They would punch out 16 clutch core plates at a time, 3x / second, 24 hours per day. BOOM BOOM BOOM BOOM .... wreaked havoc on baselines.

Earplugs were, of course, required even to walk by them.
We also have 5 500 ton stamping presses and a 650ton. And they are indeed the loudest thing in the plant
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Old 06-05-2014, 02:31 PM   #11
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All I personally use is a dinky lil Atlas 10, but I do appreciate a big machine when I see one



At Metso Paper in Karlstad, Sweden.

Previously posted in the 'old machine tools are cool thread' where there is quite a bit of other neat stuff.

Cheers
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Old 06-05-2014, 11:40 PM   #12
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Working at a shake mill during college I ran a band saw from a platform where a third the band saw was below the platform and two thirds above. Probably two stories high. We sawed shake bolts edge to edge where one bolt would create to tapered shakes. Took a lot of practice to saw 18-24 long x 1 inch thick shakes on edge from edge to edge. Don't know how I kept my thumbs attached to my hands.
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Old 06-05-2014, 11:43 PM   #13
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Not my picture but I used to run a Parpas 160. Not the biggest around but it would definately get the floor shaking.


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Old 06-06-2014, 09:54 PM   #14
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Did some work at Halling Cement years ago. The cement mill was something else. Like a Saturn 5 on its side, slowly turning.
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Old 06-07-2014, 12:06 AM   #15
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