ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Battle scooters
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-02-2012, 09:47 PM   #1
dgomezhall OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: San Francisco, CA
Oddometer: 48
1981 Honda Passport C70 Restoration

Hey scooter fans,

Just wanted to report in on my latest project...well, actually my first restoration project.

I picked up this sweet little Honda Passport C70 last week for $150 after seeing a Craigslist ad on my way to visit some family...didn't expect much, but the seller was pretty flexible and the scooter had all the parts and pieces (minus mirrors).

With 6800 miles, last registered in 1989 and not knowing the last time it ran, the PO wasn't much help, but I've found a lot of resources online and some pretty affordable parts at dratv, and fortunately he had been smart enough to put a new 6v battery in before unsuccessfully trying to bring it back to life...so I loaded it in the back of the truck, surprisingly it fit with the camper shell on it!



After the family visit and everybody saying..."well now, that's a project..." I got home, made a make-shift workbench, and took a few "before" pictures:











Then started the process of getting it running. To be honest, I've never embarked on a project like this before. I've done the basic maintenance on my BMW F650gs Dakar, and maintain 29 boats (combination of motorboats and sailboats) but haven't ever tried a full on project like this.

Got the oil drained and refilled, changed the spark plug, drained the gas and cleaned the tank...looks almost new inside now. Got it started using starter fluid but gas wasn't getting into the carb. Good news is the headlight works as do the blinkers (though the rear ones are smashed so there's no blinking) but it seems like everything electrical is working minus the electric start. Once I get it running and tuned I'll delve into that.

Took the carb off and started taking things apart and cleaning. Got it all pulled apart and put back together, still no gas in there. After a couple more cleanings, decide to just get one from dratv while I continue to play with the oem one.

Missed the mailman today, so I'll go pick it up tomorrow at the post office (btw, their shipping was super fast!).

Tomorrow I'll install the new carb along with new fuel lines and put some fuel filters in the lines before the petcocks (not sure why this wasn't stock with such a tiny, sensitive carb). Hopefully getting it running tomorrow and then we'll see what happens next.

The plan is to get it running and tuned, then registered, then cosmetically cleaned up. I've been torn between trying to go OEM restoration, but I'm kind of sick of all the people doing that and then trying to sell theirs on craigslist for $1600+. I'm thinking of keeping things close, but making it mine. I didn't get this for its resale value, I got it for the project and to putz around on.

This thread will likely go through phases up updates with pauses in between as this is a learning process and work is going to start getting busy soon, but I'll try and update as much as possible, with as many pics as possible.

If anyone has any tips, tricks, or suggestions, feel free to contribute.

Thanks!
dgomezhall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 03:56 AM   #2
PinkSteel
Gnarly Adventurer
 
PinkSteel's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Fairfield County, CT
Oddometer: 205
Yeah, most guys doing the Passport restoration just buy the DrATV carb....it really is plug and play. Mine came jetted perfectly and has been in constant use since I installed it 4-5 years ago.
PinkSteel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 08:12 AM   #3
Dabears
Beastly Adventurer
 
Dabears's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Atlanta Burbs
Oddometer: 1,027
Looks like a great project- Do you have the legshields for it? They really make the look seem finished.
__________________
Dabears

2012 SYM HD200 Evo
2006 R1200GS
1980 Vespa P200E
Dabears is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 08:21 AM   #4
hexnut
just cruising
 
hexnut's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: middle Tennessee
Oddometer: 1,278
The leg-shields are available from DrATV (Beatrice Cycle) as well.
__________________
Kymco People S 250
2012 Honda Shadow Spirit

hexnuts...a curse put on your balls by a mean gypsy
3/5 Cav, C Troop, BlackKnights, Vietnam 1969
hexnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 08:38 AM   #5
dgomezhall OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: San Francisco, CA
Oddometer: 48
I do have the legshield as well as the battery cover, but the legshield is pretty much toast...once I get to the cosmetic stage I'll get that ordered as well as a replacement front fender.
dgomezhall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 08:42 AM   #6
dgomezhall OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: San Francisco, CA
Oddometer: 48
The seat foam is pretty munched, surprisingly though, the seat pan is in excellent condition. Anybody ever rebuilt a seat?
dgomezhall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 09:01 AM   #7
hexnut
just cruising
 
hexnut's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: middle Tennessee
Oddometer: 1,278
Cheap Cycle parts has a lot of the C70 parts as well.

http://www.cheapcycleparts.com/makes/1-honda/years
__________________
Kymco People S 250
2012 Honda Shadow Spirit

hexnuts...a curse put on your balls by a mean gypsy
3/5 Cav, C Troop, BlackKnights, Vietnam 1969
hexnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 10:41 AM   #8
MacNoob
Beastly Adventurer
 
MacNoob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: The mosquito-y Center of Canada
Oddometer: 1,521
I see the legshield in the back of the truck in the first photo.

Repros are available but they are not the same as the original - functional, but obviously a copy.

I have a '82 (12V) with 26,000km showing on the odometer; it'll still haul my 200 lbs to barely 80kmh (50mph) if I have a good tuck, flat road, and favourable winds...
__________________
Quote:
"Ignorance, you see, can be out thought. Arrogance can be outmaneuvered. But ignorance and arrogance combined are unassailable."
82 Honda C70, 71 Honda CL175, 08 Kawasaki KLR650, 85 Honda GL1200 Goldwing
MacNoob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 02:10 PM   #9
HandKPhil
Gnarly Adventurer
 
HandKPhil's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Southeast Michigan
Oddometer: 455
My 12V '83

Here's my '83 that I restored. I think I paid $650 for it, put about $200 into it, and sold it a year later for $800. I'm obviously not going to retire on the money I've made from restoring bikes.
__________________
HandKPhil
HandKPhil is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 02:14 PM   #10
HandKPhil
Gnarly Adventurer
 
HandKPhil's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Southeast Michigan
Oddometer: 455
Bringing back your leg shield.

In regards to the legshield, I cleaned the OEM part in the bathtub with hot water and Simple Green. Then I lightly wet-sanded the whole part with super-fine wet-type sandpaper, dried it for several hours in the sun, and shot it with while Krylon paint, made especially for plastics. It came out very nicely.

Phil
__________________
HandKPhil
HandKPhil is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 02:18 PM   #11
HandKPhil
Gnarly Adventurer
 
HandKPhil's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Southeast Michigan
Oddometer: 455
Engine paint

Notice the engine in my picture (above). I carefully wiped every nook and cranny with acetone, taped everything off (with the engine still in the bike of course) the shot it with ceramic silver brake caliper paint from Auto Zone. It's almost an exact match for Honda silver engine paint, only it's much more durable, and it doesn't need to be clear coated.
__________________
HandKPhil
HandKPhil is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 02:26 PM   #12
HandKPhil
Gnarly Adventurer
 
HandKPhil's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Southeast Michigan
Oddometer: 455
Check all fasteners!

Safety tip: Make sure that the bolts holding the front shocks/springs into the stamped steel "fork" leg are tight. Mine were not, and the first ride at the seller's house was death-defying....


Phil
__________________
HandKPhil
HandKPhil is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 02:57 PM   #13
dgomezhall OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: San Francisco, CA
Oddometer: 48
Success today! Plugged the new carbo in, primed it with a little starting fluid, couple of kicks and it ran great...a little bit of white smoke at first but then clean and smooth. Adjusted the idle screw 1/2 a turn and rode it around for 20 min...what a blast!

Regarding fasteners, the forks seemed ok but when I pulled it back onto the table I definitely had several loose bolts.

Next project is the rear blinkers and then getting it registered, hopefully that's not too much more difficult than getting it running.
dgomezhall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 03:52 PM   #14
MacNoob
Beastly Adventurer
 
MacNoob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: The mosquito-y Center of Canada
Oddometer: 1,521
Check the operation of the front forks. They can be crazy loose and you won't notice until you wipe out. Stand in front of the bike, hold the wheel between your knees, and twist the bars. There are a dozen little bushings that wear, down in the front suspension. The Taiwanese full kits are cheap and make a huge difference - I can't vouch for their longevity over original Honda parts.
__________________
Quote:
"Ignorance, you see, can be out thought. Arrogance can be outmaneuvered. But ignorance and arrogance combined are unassailable."
82 Honda C70, 71 Honda CL175, 08 Kawasaki KLR650, 85 Honda GL1200 Goldwing
MacNoob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 08:30 PM   #15
Wentwest
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Northern California
Oddometer: 383
I've brought back quite a few old, neglected cycles and scooters, and I can tell you that, regardless of what they look like, the tires are waiting to kill you. If you go out on the road and try to stop quickly you will slide all over, including sideways and upside down. The old tires have zero grip, they are hard as wood, and you really should replace them ASAP.

New tires are pretty inexpensive, ditto new tubes. It's your skin.
Wentwest is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 08:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014