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Old 09-27-2012, 05:09 PM   #556
AK Smitty
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Wow

I never knew there were so many bubble boys!!!

I am not one but I am really enjoying the RR and can relate. Coincidently my current bike is the first one I have ever named!!!
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Old 09-27-2012, 09:09 PM   #557
Blader54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by It'sNotTheBike View Post
It's true that living on the margins of society is difficult, but I submit that not being true
to yourself is even more difficult.

The best things in life are not the things which come easily, but the things for which
we are willing to fight, bleed, suffer, and maybe even die. The particulars vary from one
person to the next, but what matters is finding something that matters enough to you that you are
willing to endure whatever is necessary in order to experience it.

One thing is for sure, Antihero is a "hard core" guy, and I think many of us appreciate
that for its own sake even if we might not ride a Panigale or compete in triathlons which leave us in a
near-death state. At the end of the cycle of life, we all end up in the same place, but few of us stand on
the edge for very long before we get there, and those who do are bright lights in this world.


.
I agree with you, and also it seems to me that in order to be true to oneself one has to know oneself. I'm thinking that riding can bring on or help to bring on the sort of state of mind that helps you get in touch deep down in some cases. There are also bound to be folks who are already there and for them the riding is less revelatory, or perhaps revealing in a different way.
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Old 09-27-2012, 09:53 PM   #558
Lion BR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntiHero View Post
Two ideas I've been wrestling with finally collided while on my way from Detroit to Toronto. It took me a while to piece it all together. It's still not as 'clean' and precise as I'd like, but I'm still going to throw it out there there as-is. There's more to it than this, but I have to save something for the book. ;)

A psychoanalyst named Spitz in the 40s studied the extremely high mortality rates among children in institutions and discovered that without touching, goochie-gooing, laughing or cuddling, children became sick, lost weight and died. His research led to the development of attachment theory and the realization that an infant “needs to develop a relationship with at least one primary caregiver for mental, social and emotional development to occur normally.” (This, in turn, led to the seemingly obvious result: solid parental affection leads to emotional balance and a child that grows up feeling secure.) The child who grows up with intermittent affection – or is abused and neglected – will suffer from a life-long sense of insecurity, feelings of doom, lack of confidence and inadequacy (despite what he/she accomplishes) as well as a whole host of other possible behavioral, psychological and health issues. The part of our brain responsible for everything we consider human—love, tenderness, emotions, reciprocity—is called the limbic brain (vs. the reptilian one that controls our vitals and the neocortical brain that is responsible for thought and language).

For those who do suffer limbic deprivation when young (which can come from enforced isolation, neglect or abuse) life can be a living physiological hell: the desire for love and affection still exists (and is in a lot of cases even greater than in well-adjusted counterparts), but the capacity to actually FEEL loved is greatly diminished. Depression, anxiety, ennui, weariness, despair, aggression, etc. are the easy-to-recognize consequences, but there are others that are not typically seen as a result of the deprivation. Though healthy limbic systems can deal with emotional pain internally by releasing small amounts of opiates (there are more opiate receptors in the limbic brain than anywhere else) when needed; an undeveloped or damaged limbic system cannot. Drug and alcohol use, for instance, perform surrogate limbic regulation that modulate, suppress and compensate for what the limbic brain didn’t ‘learn’ in infancy and can lead to a chronic, lifelong separation-anxiety. Other methods of self-regulation include self-mutilation (an act that is not specific just to humans), which seems like a desperate cry for help, but topical injuries are actually a way to release natural analgesics and opiates. (In one sentence the mystery of why acupuncture works and why people hit walls when they’re angry have been resolved!).

So why this Neurology 101 lesson?

I haven’t not felt at peace on my bike ever. One more time: I haven’t NOT felt peace—at any time--while riding. I think clearer on the bike, the symptoms of post-brainiotomy are reduced and, aside from my hamstrings and glutes being cooked, I physically and emotionally feel far healthier on the bike than off. The anxieties and disappointments of ‘real life’ are diminished, I can think about problems without being affected by them and simply feel as if everything is going to be ok. It’s a mild euphoria—and I’m not talking about the excitement that comes from nailing an apex or spinning the back out of a turn without crashing. There’s a connection between man and machine unlike anything I’ve ever had with another non-living thing. We’ve all felt it, but in all the years I’ve been riding, I’ve never heard or read anyone go in depth as to why. It would be easy to assume it’s a psychological result of the freedom we feel on a bike—or perhaps it’s the exhilaration that comes from taking risks--and nothing more.

But if we examine the stereotypical motorcyclist (rebellious, recalcitrant, problems with the authorities, hard-drinking, self-sabotaging, dissatisfied, frustrated, empty, adrenaline-seeking, tattooed loners who-if they find their place in society-still will never feel like they belong) we witness textbook examples of what? Limbic malfunction. (If there ever was a poster child for this it'd be Leonard Smalls, who, not coincidentally is inked with a "Mama Didn't Love Me" tattoo.)





So why is it that so many people who have similar symptoms to those with limbic malfunction choose motorcycles? Why not scooters or RVs? My theory is this: Motorcycles function as limbic system regulators and those who have the most difficulty regulating their own internal states gravitate to a piece of machinery that do it for them.

A quick examination of mammalian limbic synchronicity reveals some striking parallels with characteristics of motorcycles. There are specific sensory inputs that function as stimulators and regulators of internal systems in mammals. For instance, warmth and smells cue activity and metabolic levels, tactile stimulation increases growth hormone levels, feeling the heart rate and rise and fall of another’s chest regulates heart rate, respiration and circadian cadences, and immune system strength increases or decreases based on sensory stimulation. And if you look at the external cues that influence positive internal changes in mammals, we see how motorcycles produce mammalian signals that we desire with human physical contact. An engine is a pulsing heartbeat we feel, rpms rise and fall like air in and out of lungs, the wind caresses our hair and face and bodies like a lover would (a reason why so many riders ride helmetless even though it makes no ‘sense’?), there’s warmth from the engine, the bike embraces our bodies (sportbikes put us in the a fetal position, a Harley spoons you from behind), and perhaps most important the bike reacts to our every input and responds to our inner states—if we’re restless it speeds up, if relaxed, it slows down.

And when we talk about being “one” with the bike or the road, what we’re actually experiencing is a limbic resonance where our physiological rhythms is adjusted and modified through synchronized contact with our beloved motorbikes. (And while we’re talking about being “one” with the bike, it is interesting to note that the term “stress” originates from the Latin word meaning “to pull apart” or “separate”. Basically, stress is the result of being separated from an attachment figure and, in their absence, our bodies physically feel the separation, which leads to illness and disease. It’s the exact opposite feeling we obtain when riding. And if stress and not feeling complete lead to illness, it’s not a stretch to assume that feeling one with the bike will lead to better health and longevity.)

In short, neural and physiological stability requires synchronization from an outside source. Many of our internal processes are not self-regulating. Motorbikes provide a surrogate regulator that modify everything from cardiovascular health to immune function, hormone levels and circadian rhythms. It’s only natural to become attached to such an object, going so far as to refer to them with names and attributing gender (nearly always female, no coincidence).

Funny enough--my whole life I refused to name any of my cars or bikes. I referred to them simply as “it,” because I thought I loved them precisely because they weren’t people. But the whole time my beloved vehicles provided me with the mammalian contact and regulatory synchronization I desperately needed.

And why is this topic so important to me you might be wondering? I wasn’t abused as a child, but as a newborn I spent 14 days isolated in an oxygen tent. It was an event I’ll never be able to remember, but the impact of those two weeks have persisted my whole life.



So now, for the first time in my life, it’s time for me to give her a name she deserves.
Check this book:
Bodies in Motion: Evolution and Experience in Motorcycling.
Steven Thompson

Steve starts well, lines up several good arguments, and when you think he has the story ready for some conclusion he never goes there and instead gets lost on motor vibrations... (you will get the vibrations thing when you read it). I actually like that he does not offer a ready made conclusion, because inadvertently perhaps, he lets me think about his arguments and reach my own conclusions.

I'm also drafting a couple of ideas about why I ride. Not quite at a sophisticated level, though.
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Old 09-28-2012, 06:18 AM   #559
Stixx
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Originally Posted by live2ridetahoe View Post
Hillary Clinton

Why would anyone want to name a Penigale, Hillary Clinton, kinda opposites , when I think of Hillary I think of the quote, "Where boners go to die"..............jusayin
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Old 09-28-2012, 07:13 AM   #560
live2ridetahoe
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Originally Posted by Stixx View Post
Why would anyone want to name a Penigale, Hillary Clinton, kinda opposites , when I think of Hillary I think of the quote, "Where boners go to die"..............jusayin
It was meant to be sarcastic...

JG
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Old 09-28-2012, 08:16 AM   #561
likestoride
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VERY interesting

GREAT essay. Definitely has me thinking. I had meningitis as a baby and was isolated for a while during treatment. Antihero may be on to something.
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Old 09-28-2012, 03:03 PM   #562
AntiHero OP
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Gotta finish Montreal off soon as I've been gone for several days already!

But before I go--a few more Montrealean signs:

One of my favorites:
Catching falling poop is strictly prohibited





This one alerts pedestrians of the dangers presented by giant Newton's Cradles:



Fairly self-explanatory:

No one likes a showoff


This is simply cruel:

People in wheelchairs are prohibited from riding bikes


.
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Old 09-28-2012, 07:57 PM   #563
lucati
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at the start of the ride report you discussed the bike being a chick magnet. now you are talking about all this mental stuff and making everyone think, and some brains hurt! hahahahahaha

it's good to be diversified and dynamic, keep it coming.
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Old 09-28-2012, 08:27 PM   #564
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Originally Posted by lucati View Post
at the start of the ride report you discussed the bike being a chick magnet. now you are talking about all this mental stuff and making everyone think, and some brains hurt! hahahahahaha

it's good to be diversified and dynamic, keep it coming.
I think you might have skipped from page one to page 38. I've been talking about 'mental stuff' the entire time.

But to answer your question, the bike is still a magnet. I'm not, though--and don't care to be. Relationships never favor those who care the most and morality prevents me from caring the least. So I'm pretty much fucked.
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Old 09-29-2012, 05:22 AM   #565
nicola_a
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Originally Posted by AntiHero View Post
I think you might have skipped from page one to page 38. I've been talking about 'mental stuff' the entire time.

But to answer your question, the bike is still a magnet. I'm not, though--and don't care to be. Relationships never favor those who care the most and morality prevents me from caring the least. So I'm pretty much fucked.
Possibly not the case in your opinion, but the Panigale seems to be the relationship you need right now. And she is being truly faithful.

And from a woman who doesn't know you apart from your words and your talent at photographing beautiful bikes and scenery ----- you're definitely not fucked (at least not in the bad way).

Hanging out for the next update.

nicola_a screwed with this post 09-29-2012 at 05:23 AM Reason: spelling
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Old 09-29-2012, 12:47 PM   #566
lucati
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Originally Posted by AntiHero View Post
I think you might have skipped from page one to page 38. I've been talking about 'mental stuff' the entire time.

But to answer your question, the bike is still a magnet. I'm not, though--and don't care to be. Relationships never favor those who care the most and morality prevents me from caring the least. So I'm pretty much fucked.
hahahaha!

i have followed the report post by post. i was just trying to be funny, not busting your chops. i am still following and that proves it's good stuff. i do appreciate your efforts.

as for you caring more, your bike cares less than you. it is a cold object. hummm
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Old 09-29-2012, 05:33 PM   #567
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucati View Post
hahahaha!
i have followed the report post by post. i was just trying to be funny, not busting your chops. i am still following and that proves it's good stuff. i do appreciate your efforts.
as for you caring more, your bike cares less than you. it is a cold object. hummm
It's cool, didn't take it personally.

As for the bike--Imagination may be the father of all terrors (and the source for all discontent), so I think it's only fair to use it every now and then make believe....

Ok, so Montreal--hope you're hungry! First couple days there I had some really bad meals. I actually went to lunch (take out), came home, took two bites and threw it away. Went out again to a different place and had a lamb gyro, which was nearly as bad. But things got better. The highlight was Au Pied de Cochon. Chef Versys recommended it and it was the most memorable meal in Montreal. Pics speak for themselves:

Foie Gras Cromesquis that explode when you bite into them:


Apple Foie Gras was savory, succulent and crispy, buttery, salty, sweet, squishy, firm, textured, silky and rich:


The one brazenly awesome dish they make especially for anorexics is called "Duck in a Can, which is Duck, Potato, Fois Gras, a thick slice of fat and other unhealthy goodness canned in the morning, then baked (in the can) in the eve. I'm sure it's probably tainted with mercury during the whole process, but it's worth it.



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Old 09-29-2012, 05:43 PM   #568
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Didn't stop there, though. A piece of Bambi's shoulder cut and grilled to perfection at RoadKill Cafe (O'Thym):



Sushi at Tri Express was so good it had me thinking about licking instead of biting:



Grilled short ribs at Kazu:



Vegetarian bean curd with seedless sunflower seed glaze:



M-16 Beef Rendang at Gado Gado:



Though I've had some of the worst meals of the trip in Montreal, the pics above are proof that persistence pays off.

One last goodbye to my apt:

AntiHero screwed with this post 09-29-2012 at 06:07 PM
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Old 09-29-2012, 06:06 PM   #569
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To put things in perspective, I often don't eat anything except Arnica until 2 or 3pm most days and often just have bread and beans or a can of tuna for dinner. So when I'm presented with a page or two of menu items I tend to take the 'nothing succeeds like excess' route.

One of the last nights in Montreal wandering the streets:


Then back to the loving arms of the open road (and my first fall colors):






I found out how much wood a woodchuck can chuck on the way to Maine:



AntiHero screwed with this post 09-29-2012 at 07:06 PM
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Old 09-29-2012, 06:15 PM   #570
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Wow...you're still here?! It's bleeping cold and the roads are horrible!On your way down to the US if you can...you must check out Tracy Road near rte 9 and the 87 in Upper NY state...Often considered the best motorcycle road in this area.

I'm interested in the Panigale but dealers up here aren't very accommodating and I will not purchase a bike without at least a 60 min ride. I did demo the BMW S1000rr on two separate occasions for 90 mins and it is comfortable for distance riding...at least for me. How are you holding up on your bike so far?

D.
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