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Old 08-14-2012, 10:05 PM   #16
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Steve,

I might need to tag along for the next adventure.

Cheers, Paul

Absolutely!
That settles it, I don't need to learn Spanish before Panama 2014. Thanks for handling that, Pablito.
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:07 AM   #17
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Day 11: CJ takes the baton - Creston to Golden, BC

Day 11 begins slowly... with a bit of a hangover. Rob passes the Arctic Relay baton to CJ, packs up, and heads south. He'll spend 4 or 5 days getting back to Portland via Idaho. CJ and I will push north - ending up in Golden for the night. [292 miles total / ~60 dirt]


The day starts with that awesome BC-3A / BC-31 combo again. We cross the ferry at Kootenay Bay [Crawford Bay?] and meet some other riders. Ferry crossings are good for that, as they tend to group bikes together on loading. The guy in the foreground is a local riding a Triumph Tiger Explorer. He apparently does a big Edelweiss tour every couple years or so. The two other riders are together - on a tour from I-don't-remember-where. What you can't see next to the Ducati there is a cherry 1982 [?] Honda CBX. The owner is sporting burgundy and tan leathers that match the vintage of the bike. Awesome!






The 'Hi-Viz' in that helmet has male pattern baldness. Please chime in if you think CJ is overdue for a new lid! We figured out that this one was probably made in 2005 - and he rides pretty much every day.


We roll through Kaslo and stop for lunch. It's a great city [in the summer, anyways]. I'd like to spend some time here. We learn that there is a drinking water advisory in the area because of epic high water in the river. We had apparently just missed a 40-year storm the week prior - a story I'll get all the way up to the Dempster Hwy. We take the waitress's advice and have beer with our lunch instead of water ... twist our arms. Here's CJ adding to the high water situation.


Outside of Kaslo, we see our first moose of the trip - a young, very frightened, female who ran along ahead of us on the road. We finally had to come to a complete stop to let her collect herself and get back into the woods.


Beyond Kaslo, the BC-31 turns to fast, damp, hard-packed dirt - tons of fun.




We cross a bridge over said high river and decide to jump in ... to experience run-off from a 40-year rain firsthand.


In the photo, the bridge doesn't look high or the river fast-moving, but both are true. We jumped off more or less in the middle of the bridge and then had to swim with all our might to reach the spot on the bank where we had thrown our shoes. Miss it, and we were going to be climbing out of a fast-moving river into dense forest ... barefoot. Oh yeah, did I mention that the water was COLD!?


We had another fabulous ferry crossing at Galena Bay.


By this point, we had the whole ferry crossing thing down.


More unbelievable beauty.


We saw lots of these big beetles in this area. They hurt when they hit you in the face at 60mph, and they stunk if they exploded.


We had a delicious dinner at the Golden Taps Pub and decided to crash at the Golden municipal campsite. The site was expensive, packed full of RV's, and was located right next to the [active] railroad tracks. Not our best call, but it was dark and we had had a long day. We didn't care too much.
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Arctic Relay 2012 - aka "Pass the Gringo"

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Old 08-15-2012, 02:25 AM   #18
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Day 12: Icefields Parkway / Lil LaSalle Lake

Day 12 would take us through Banff and Jasper National Parks on the Icefields Parkway - and then along the CA-16 [Yellowhead Hwy.] to just East of Prince George, BC. [351 total miles / ~30 on dirt]


It was 7/7/12 - a beautiful, sunny, Saturday afternoon in the middle of summer. We Rode from Golden to Lake Louise, where we steeled our nerves in preparation for a day of National Park speed limits and RV traffic. It was a bummer to have to pay $20 for the privilege of driving in traffic, but the scenery was worth all of it. Just don't expect solitude on this section of the ride.






This was my first glacier sighting - very exciting. I believe this is the Columbia Icefield.


At the midway point on the route, there is a cafeteria where you can pay too much money for crappy food in a miserable atmosphere. We hadn't made any other preparations for food, hoping for a quality mom-and-pop along the route, but no dice. I payed $9 for an awful heap of poutine [french fries with gravy and cheese curds]. I had never tried it before and was curious. Perhaps this was not the place to be adventurous.


At Tete Jaune Cache, we jumped off of the 16 [which was fairly boring slab] and took the dirt backroads West to Dunster along the Fraser River. That got to be the norm throughout this trip - whenever possible, jump off the highway and take a smaller dirt route. This one proved to be exquisite.




The highlight of the [amazing] day was our campsite that night - possibly the best of the trip. The map said that there was camping in McBride, so we had arbitrarily made that our destination for the night. In McBride, we found a bleak, mosquito-infested RV campsite ... and a gas station at which we decided to inquire about other accommodations. The young clerk told us about a spot up the road called Little LaSalle Lake. He said it was tiny, beautiful, and that he was pretty sure they had campsites there. We asked some locals outside about the spot and got the same response - "It's beautiful. If you blink, you'll miss it. I think they might have a campsite there."

We found it...


It was crazy beautiful...


But 'officially', it was not a campsite. That didn't stop us. It was the most beautiful, secluded spot we had seen in days - and it was ours for the night. There was a narrow walking path that led down to a tiny level area with a picnic table and fire ring. We decided we didn't want to attract attention to our misuse of the site by leaving our bikes up at the parking area, so we braved a bit of 'single-track'.


It was SO worth it!






CJ's kickstand sunk in the mud and the GS took a nap. It was fun trying to get that huge bike out of the soft, mossy bog the next morning.


I tested our bear box solution for the first time that night - one of my Caribou side cases, full of all the food and stinky stuff, hung in a tree. We had seen our first black bears of the trip that day, in Jasper NP, so I was a bit paranoid.
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Old 08-15-2012, 03:07 AM   #19
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Day 13: Lil LaSalle Lake to New Hazelton

Day 13 we mostly slabbed along the Trans-Canada Hwy [16] thru Prince George to New Hazelton.
[397 total miles / ~25 on dirt]


Prince George is a sprawling city with all the big box options a person could want. I'm loving being away from cities, but we did take full advantage of those big box stores. We spent WAY too much time at the Wal-Mart - buying supplies, doing chain service and other bike work, making phone calls, etc., etc. Among the other provisions, I picked up a can of silly string to lighten the mood. Now, for the record, it would be totally unsafe to unload a can of silly string on a fellow motorcyclist's face and windshield at 40 mph on a country road. I would never recommend doing such a thing. At least it was Hi-Viz silly string...




We were able to get off the highway for a stretch above Smithers, on Telkwa High Rd. This was a welcome break - nice, hard-packed dirt through farms, ranches, and forest. At New Hazelton, we jumped off the highway towards Hazelton [Old Town] to check out the Hagwilget Bridge and find some dinner. No go on food & drink on a Sunday night, it turns out. Oh well, the bridge was cool!


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Arctic Relay 2012 - aka "Pass the Gringo"

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Old 08-15-2012, 11:27 AM   #20
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Keep it coming!

Nice work Steve. I'm hooked.
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Old 08-15-2012, 12:12 PM   #21
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Nice work Steve. I'm hooked.
Bear
Thanks Bear!
How's the 950?
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:31 PM   #22
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Day 14: Cassiar / Stewart-Hyder

Day 14 would take us up the Cassiar Hwy., down the off-shoot to Stewart / Hyder, and eventually to Kinaskan Lake. [338 miles total] Click here to download a very helpful map of the Cassier Hwy. - courtesy of The Milepost.


This was the point at which I figured CJ was going to turn back for home. It was the logical point for him to make a loop out of the route with the ~7 days he originally had to play with. Well... you know how the road can get to you. We were having an awesome time, and CJ got the bug to go further North. He wanted to touch Alaska and the Yukon - work and family would understand. Yes! I've got a companion for the Cassiar!


The Cassiar was amazing. I can see why riders love it so much. It's not particularly twisty, but the scenery is amazing, and there's very little other traffic on it. I found myself waving to any other passing motorist the way I do to other riders.

We hear that there are awesome glaciers to be seen on the off-shoot road over to Stewart, BC and Hyder, AK - plus, this will be the only chance for CJ to touch Alaskan soil. So, we head West. There are indeed amazing glaciers to be witnessed.




Stewart, BC is definitely the dominant city of this pair. Hyder, AK is kind of along for the ride - just a cluster of run-down buildings selling souvenirs. We were thinking this was going to be a big metropolis - somewhere were we could make a few phone calls on a US cellular carrier and stock up on cheap beer [we were paying ~$14 for a six pack of macrobrew in Canada!]. No dice. This is what constituted an international border crossing - a sign along a muddy, rutted dirt road.


We did our laundry and got lunch at the King Eddy hotel, stocked up on groceries, made our phone calls with a calling card, and rode over to the Petro-Canada to gas up... no dice again. The tanker carrying fuel to the only gas station in town had broken down and its replacement wouldn't arrive until late that evening - maybe the next day. We did not have enough gas to get to the next gas station on our route - we had to get gas here. Now, here's where the differences between CJ and I become apparent. CJ's reaction was to chill out on the grass in the downtown park and wait - maybe a kind soul would offer for us to siphon a few gallons. I, on the other hand, sprang into problem-solving mode - making signs, flagging down passing motorists, and eventually riding over to the industrial side of town to try to beg fuel off of someone with a stockpile. Sometimes I wish I could just relax on the grass... I guess I need to work on that.


Regardless, in the industrial area, I met Fernando... who had a buddy, Darryl... who had a bunch of toys. He would surely have some gas to sell us. Darryl did, in fact, sell us a jerry can of high test [enough to get us out to the next station], but not before chatting us up excitedly about bikes, snowmobiles, helicopters, and the beauty of Stewart and its surrounds. Darryl was a helicopter pilot, flying out and setting up platforms for exploratory drilling operations - looking for minerals worth mining. He was a great guy, and we were very grateful for the fuel - thanks Darryl! In hindsight, we totally blew our chance at a helicopter ride around the area... oh well, next time.


Back on the Cassiar, we gassed up the rest of the way at Bell II [great spot!] and pushed North.


We saw over a dozen black bears along the way.


We got another fantastic camp spot at Kinaskan Lake - complete with uber-friendly and helpful German camp hosts. We started using the presence of Germans as the benchmark for whether a place was cool. Every amazing place we ended up on this trip, there were Germans - camp hosts, bartenders, other tourists. Germans really seem to appreciate and seek out natural beauty. This picture was taken literally 10' from my tent.


CJ had volunteered to handle camp dinner that night and had purchased the makings of tuna helper in Stewart. Mmm... 'no brand', assorted size peas.


At least they were Hi-Viz peas...


No surprise, this turned out to be... not so tasty. Most of it went into the campfire. That night, I really started to notice that it was getting dark much later. The sky was still fairly bright at 11pm.
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Old 08-15-2012, 02:22 PM   #23
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Day 15: Cassiar / Al-Can / Whitehorse

Day 15 takes us up the rest of the Cassiar Hwy. and then West on the Al-Can [1] to Whitehorse, Yukon. It ends up being my highest mileage day, mostly because the Al-Can is a high-speed mega highway [by local standards].
[510 miles total]


Each of us brought a pound of coffee from our respective homes: Peets from Oakland and Stumptown from Portland. I even carried no-refrigeration-necessary creamers and organic sugar. Roughing it, indeed. Benjava would have been pleased with our priorities.


The rest of the Cassiar is awesome. The vegetation is starting to change noticeably - trees are getting scragglier and shorter. We see evidence of past forest fires too - here, the left side of the road was burnt, the right side wasn't.


We see lots of this too - apparently cuttings from widening the easement, all piled up like huge pyres along the road. Any insight on what this is all about?


At the top of the Cassiar, we cross into the Yukon Territory. CJ wonders what the hell we're doing there.


I'm just happy not to be at work...


The Al-Can was pretty terrible, as far as I was concerned. The huge path of vegetation that was removed to make the road and its wide easements on either side [so you can see approaching animals, I guess] meant that there was nothing to buffer the wind. We hauled ass and got pummeled by gusts for hours - it was exhausting, but we just wanted to get through it.


There were beautiful spots, for sure...


In Whitehorse, we were craving some creature comforts - not having had a proper bed or shower in 5 days. We got into town late [~9pm?] to find that there was an international Women's softball tournament going on in town that week. Every single hotel room in the entire city was booked. At the Town & Mountain, the super-friendly German desk clerk [again with the awesome Germans!] called all over town on our behalf - eventually tracking down a 'cabin' at the BeezKneez Bakpaker hostel up the street.


We'd get some of our creature comforts - bunk beds, shared bathrooms with hot showers, and wifi. They put us in the Sugar Shack - one of several sheds in the backyard that they had outfitted [quite nicely, I must say] as guest 'cabins'. There was also a VW bus that had been gutted and outfitted as a room. Accommodations for two set us back $40. For reference, hotels started at like $120. This place was awesome - would definitely stay here again. I think the Sugar Shack was as close to a 'honeymoon suite' as the BeezKneez had to offer... not that we were seeking out such a thing, it's just what was available... honest.


We go out to find some nightlife... of which there's little in Whitehorse. We do get to experience a bit of midnight sun.
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Old 08-15-2012, 03:40 PM   #24
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Day 16: Whitehorse / Tagish racetrack / muddy backroads

We decided that it didn't make sense for CJ to ride any further North than this. We'd dump our bags and spend the day riding around the Whitehorse area together with lighter loads - CJ would push South tomorrow. Even theBeezKneez was booked up that night, but they called around and found us a room at - the Mountain Ridge Motel & RV park, just outside town. They have suites with fully-outfitted kitchenettes, laundry, etc. - for around the price of a basic room in town.


We headed downtown to buy a few things and so I could figure out an oil change. I had put around 3600 miles on the 'Strom since Oakland, and I wanted to keep her purring. Being high motorcycle season, all the shops in the area were booked up for weeks. I begged an oil pan, disposal, funnel, and use of their parking lot from Honda Whitehorse. The service manager was none too pleased about it, but the parts guys took pity on me and hooked me up.


Liquids are expensive in Canada!


After handling our business, we head down the 2 towards Skagway and then East on the 8 through Tagish and back.
[163 miles total / ~20 on dirt]



We help a motorist on the side of the road who's run out of gas - running ahead to Carcross and alerting a police officer. CJ takes this good deed as Karmic carte blanche to ride as fast as he can down the road through Tagish, assured that that was probably the only cop in the area and that he'd have a rapport with him should he catch us doing double the speed limit. We nickname this the Whitehorse Proving Grounds, as the road seems purpose-built for doing 100+ mph. Very crappy video, but here's me doing 101 through a curve.



We also jump off pavement a bunch - just exploring.


Things get a little muddy. CJ said I looked like a motorboat from behind going through this puddle.


We stop at one point and I put the kickstand down in muck ... then overcompensate on the frantic lift. Up and over to the other side.


Oh well... I got to see the muddy underbelly of the beast. This is actually the only time I've ever had this bike on its side [knock on wood].


Near Tagish, at a break near the river, an excited fisherman ran over to tell us that a bald eagle just swooped down and grabbed his fishing lure as he was casting it from the bridge. I guess it looked enough like a fish that the bird was fooled. The eagle landed on a nearby dock and dropped the lure - and as the guy approached to retrieve it, the eagle swatted it into the water spitefully with his wing. Such an American moment... too bad we were in Canada. The guy was SO excited to tell us about it ... and it was a pretty good story. Yes, I stole this photo... this is not the actual bird.


That night, we bought a couple of huge steaks and some [much-needed] veggies and used the communal grill at Mountain Ridge to cook up a feast. After dinner, our next door neighbors returned. CJ met them earlier in the day, describing them as a family of Germans [because, you know... we love Germans now]. Turns out, they're not German at all - they're from New Zealand. They're in Whitehorse to cheer on their son's girlfriend, who plays softball for the NZ team. We stayed up until the early hours of the morning drinking and carrying on with them. At the end of our time together, they gave each of us a hat for the rugby team they're fans of, back in NZ - the Vodafone Warriors. How cool is that?! It was a perfect send-off - homeward for CJ and northward for me.
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gringostd screwed with this post 08-15-2012 at 03:55 PM
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Old 08-15-2012, 09:17 PM   #25
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Oil change

I work at Yukon Honda (parts) . It is nice to see you put the cardboard down. We had a couple Brazilians come through 2 weeks ago, one did an oil change and must have spilled 1/2 liter on the ground. I gave him some rags to clean up. After they left, I went out and had a look......rags laying in the oil puddle, but absolutely no attempt to wipe it up...That is why the bosses say not to lend out oil pans.
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Old 08-15-2012, 09:27 PM   #26
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I work at Yukon Honda (parts) . It is nice to see you put the cardboard down. We had a couple Brazilians come through 2 weeks ago, one did an oil change and must have spilled 1/2 liter on the ground. I gave him some rags to clean up. After they left, I went out and had a look......rags laying in the oil puddle, but absolutely no attempt to wipe it up...That is why the bosses say not to lend out oil pans.
Nice! Thanks again for helping out. Were you the guy with the well decked-out KLR - just got back from Dust to Dawson?

I get it about people making a mess. Plus, it's not your responsibility to help every out-of-luck biker that rolls through - you're a business, not a charity. That said, I'm really glad you helped me out! I was super careful not to get any oil on the parking lot - cardboard, paper towels, etc. I would have sorted myself out with stuff bought at Canada Tire, I guess - it was just nice not to have to put all that stuff in the landfill after a single use.

Here's a thought... why not charge guys to let them change their own oil. I would have paid $10 for the use of a cardboard box, oil pan, and funnel - plus used oil disposal. You could designate an area in the lot. I don't know... probably some reason why that's a bad idea, but it's a thought.
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Old 08-15-2012, 09:47 PM   #27
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Day 17: pass the baton / Dawson City

On Day 17, I picked up a new riding companion. We'll call him Jerry. I would need him on the roads ahead, as gas stops were getting fewer and farther between.


CJ pushed off towards home. It's silly, but it made me feel very alone and out-there.


He took the Cassiar again headed South and then what sounded like some cool dirt between Vanderhoof and Quesnel.


I would push North on the 2 to Dawson City - the start of the Dempster Highway!
[349 total miles / ~15 on dirt]


And then... there was one.


I'm embarrassed to admit that it was disorienting, finally being alone after so many days on the road with someone else. Add to that the fact that I was psyching myself out worrying about road conditions on the Dempster, and I was kind of a mess - just generally not focused. At about the midpoint in the day, I had a really scary tankslapper when tarmac gave way to a 200' long stretch of deep, loose gravel - a road repair in progress. I was probably going 65... and should probably have been going 30. The bars thrashed back and forth, and the bike fishtailed out of control. I just centered my weight and tried to ride it out. Somehow, miraculously, I made it out the other side. That was my closest call of the trip. I paid serious attention to this sign, moving forward.


At this spot, I met a really cool KLR rider from New Mexico. He was riding home after visiting his son in Anchorage or Fairbanks, can't remember. He said he didn't buy anything special for the trip - his first big adventure ride. He had duffel bags piled high on the back and was wearing some generic rain gear. Sometimes I feel like I'm too prepared... takes some of the fun out of things.


Lunch. Tortillas travel so much better than bread.


Dawson City was a pretty trippy place - full of falling-down buildings from the Klondike Gold Rush era.


There were well-kept buildings as well - it was a hopping tourist town. They even had a throwback-style gambling hall with dancing saloon girls and such - proceeds from which went to keep up the decaying historical buildings. I didn't partake in any of that. I had dinner and a few beers at the Triple J Hotel, where I was staying [nice enough], wrote some postcards, and hit the sack. I would have a long day tomorrow... the great Dempster Highway!
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gringostd screwed with this post 08-15-2012 at 09:52 PM
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Old 08-16-2012, 10:45 AM   #28
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Great RR Steve! Looks like an awesome time. Subscribed!!

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Old 08-16-2012, 12:46 PM   #29
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We see lots of this too - apparently cuttings from widening the easement, all piled up like huge pyres along the road. Any insight on what this is all about?

We saw the same thing when we rode through. I believe it's from where they are putting in new elecrtical transmission lines. We talked to one of the road workers when we stopped and he said they burn those piles. I'm surprised they don't catch any of the surroundings on fire.
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Old 08-16-2012, 01:16 PM   #30
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We saw the same thing when we rode through. I believe it's from where they are putting in new elecrtical transmission lines. We talked to one of the road workers when we stopped and he said they burn those piles. I'm surprised they don't catch any of the surroundings on fire.

Yeah, that surprises me too - but they totally look like big burn piles. Maybe they wait until winter.
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