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Old 08-13-2012, 06:54 AM   #16
empedrado
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Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Central NM
Oddometer: 280
Seems we get a lot of flats in these parts and for some reason the heavier the bike the more likely it will flat. After finding that we could fix the flats on 990's faster than we could air them up and seat the bead a buddy and I went industrial.

We were finding that because of the pressure needed that we were swapping multiple pumps to fill up these tires to keep the small chinese pumps from overheating.

We ended up going with a Viair pump used by the four wheeling community. This pump actually cost less than my Best Rest which failed miserably from dust comtamination. The pumps we are using have air filters and are truly better built that the cheap ones.

But they are heavier and larger so we are only using them on the bigger dual sport bikes saving our cheap pumps for our dirt bikes and light weight dual sport machines.
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Old 08-13-2012, 07:48 AM   #17
MikeMike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by empedrado View Post
This pump actually cost less than my Best Rest which failed miserably from dust comtamination.
That is very interesting. In this case, not a whole lot of difference between one Chinese pump and another tarted up Chinese pump.
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Old 08-13-2012, 07:58 AM   #18
empedrado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeMike View Post
That is very interesting. In this case, not a whole lot of difference between one Chinese pump and another tarted up Chinese pump.

True, I took my Best Rest apart after it left me high and dry. I do like the hoses on it and the way it connects to the tire. But they should warn folks about dust. With those little feet on the box I naturally assumed it was ok to sit on the ground. Well in our dusty part of the world the vibration makes its own little dust cloud that just gets sucked into the pump. I would guess I only got four or five tire repairs with that pump before it failed. The cheap ones we took apart lasted longer as you have to hold them up out of the dirt. Thus the nice box the Best Rest comes in actually was a negative not a positive vs other cheap Chinese pumps.

The Viair pump is much more robust, which comes at the price of weight, but it also has a much bigger piston -- which equates to more volume.
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Old 08-13-2012, 08:22 AM   #19
MikeMike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by empedrado View Post
The cheap ones we took apart lasted longer as you have to hold them up out of the dirt.
I usually hang mine from the foot peg so it is off the ground and just suspended, that is why I have the extra long wiring.

I also have one of those foot pumps, the mini ones, but don't carry it anymore because of the ease of use of the "little engine from China". If they can put a man in space, their $10 pumps are going to work. LOL! Just how different is the $100 buck pump from the $10 buck pump apart from the case and the hose?
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:25 AM   #20
Witold
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I also use one of the cheapie compressors that I stripped of the outside plastic.

I did have one of them die on me. I never take care of it though. I just throw it in and it rattles around for months or years in the trunk.

I could care less about performance of a compressor. After I manage to fix a flat - particularly on a tubed tire - I need a break anyway.
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Old 08-13-2012, 10:07 AM   #21
Lobster
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I just recently changed my tire and tube and it took like 60-70 psi in the tube to seat the bead.

One of these little suckers gonna be able to push that much air on the side of the road?
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Old 08-13-2012, 10:13 AM   #22
MikeMike
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Mine did it for a guy with a KLR. Took a little less than 6 minutes for the rear tire, a Pirelli.

Good stuff here, ladies and gentlemen:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...=286669&page=3

Almost as good as an oil thread!

MikeMike screwed with this post 08-13-2012 at 10:53 AM
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Old 10-29-2012, 10:30 AM   #23
gspdbill
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Ordered one of these, always liked the RiderWarehouse products. More expensive than many but on the side of the road that will not be important.

http://www.aerostich.com/tools/tire-...ompressor.html
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Old 10-29-2012, 10:38 AM   #24
MikeMike
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You'd be sending Aerostitch about $30 for doing the gutting for you.
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Old 10-29-2012, 12:09 PM   #25
bomber60015
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I, too, carry a gutted slime/walmart/drugstore pump.

I do check it a couple of times a year, just to make sure . . . .I've had good luck, in that they geranerlly last 3 or 4 years before go pear-shaped . . . . .

if a piece of gear is that critical to you that you would list longevity as a prime requirement, it's critical enough to test now and again, I think . . .
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Old 10-29-2012, 04:17 PM   #26
FlowBee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobster View Post
I just recently changed my tire and tube and it took like 60-70 psi in the tube to seat the bead.

One of these little suckers gonna be able to push that much air on the side of the road?
bump.

I've been carrying these sort of cheap chinese electric pumps for years, but have never used one to seat the bead. I've used them to air-up a patched car tire, air up a patches lawn tractor tire, and of course top off motorcycle tires. They always end up a bit hot to the touch after about 10 minutes. Again, I'll admit I've never used one to seat a bead.

How are these cheap chinese electric pumps at seating the bead? Should we all be carrying bicycle pumps or CO2 as well / instead?
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Old 10-29-2012, 06:38 PM   #27
panhead_dan
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Most any of these things will seat the bead on a tube type tire but none of them will do so on a tubeless tire. Most have the pressure but none have the volume of air needed.

I've been using one of the gutted $10 ones for years but I keep it clean and lube it with some good Mobil 1 spray stuff. This seems to help with the heating up issue and the thing just won't die. I once filled all 4 flat or nearly flat tires on a loaded boat trailer nonstop using my bike as a power source.
I found the small slime pump at Ace hardware for $10. Might just have to pick one up.
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Old 10-29-2012, 09:25 PM   #28
nickgindy
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http://www.harborfreight.com/air-too...sor-69285.html
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Old 10-29-2012, 09:25 PM   #29
glasswave
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I use the stop -n- go. Bought it because I liked the size and that it had a pressure gauge. It's about the same price as the slime, but I have heard some complaints about quality. It's working fine for me so far. It has a handy little case as well.

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Old 10-29-2012, 10:05 PM   #30
greygeezer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeMike View Post
This is a very, very easy thing to do.
Simply buy one of the cheapo Chinese little air compressors that run between $5 or maybe $8 max at any Walomart or flea market.
Open the plastic, there are usually 3 or 4 screws to remove.
Carefully extract the innards.
The guage is next to useless so either put teflon tape on the threads and cap it with a suitable plug, or cut the hose a little ways and insert a small ballbearing or silicone in a broken golf tee, and then use a zip-tie to keep either the ball bearing in or the golf tee in. You can use some duct tape on this to seal it, also, if you like.
On the electrical end of things, decide on what you want for a plug. I opted for using alligator clips, small ones, and I unsoldered the leads that were present from the male spade connectors (these were so poorly attached you could probably scare them off just by looking at them with a frown), next, I cut off the cheapo cigarette lighter end. I then soldered the alligator clips to the freshly bared ends, then I soldered two female spade connectors on the other ends. Why? Because I can then use the long electrical cable for another purpose if necessary and it makes it easier to tuck the whole works away.
The pump I ended up with will inflate a tire in less than 3 and a half minutes to 38psi, it hardly even gets hot (it is still easy to handle), it makes pressure instantly, and best of all, it all fits in the palm of my hand and I store it in a little airline shaving kit bag that I had kicking around in the workshop. It literally took me less time to make it than it did to post this message.

The difference between this setup and the $100 one for sale on some websites is the aluminum box and about $90 in my opinion and I will bet the performance is exactly the same, a few minutes to air up to 38 lbs.
Great write up...Informative and witty !!
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