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Old 04-04-2014, 08:18 AM   #1
coloradogoose OP
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Location: I can see the desert from here...
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Yamaha CT1 Mutation - My first build

I'll start by saying that this is my first build and I'm picking up a lot of new skills as I go. What I lack in skills, I make up for in complete stupidity.

I have always been a tinkerer and now that my wife and I own a house I've been able to accumulate tools at a higher rate, which is probably a bad thing for this project. I really shouldn't be allowed to touch anything more complicated than a hammer because I'll probably break the tool and whatever I'm using the tool on.

A brief warning. If you are a purist type bike mechanic you'll want to stop reading right now and hide. I am neither pure nor a motorcycle mechanic of any kind.

On to the bike...

It is a 1971 Yamaha CT1 175. It was given to me by a friend whose father purchsed the bike when it was new. The guy whose bike it was did the Barstow to Vegas race on it back in the 70s. It had been sitting in his shed and hadn't been registered since 1992. My original plan had been to do a straight restoration on it, but my imagination took over. For some strange reason I LOVE small four stroke bikes. My favorite bike that I own right now is a 2003 250cc Kawasaki Super Sherpa. So I decided to track down a small four stroke engine to put in this bike. (The original engine will be torn apart and rebuilt at some point.) At the point that I'm writing this I've been working on this bike for a while, so I'll post pics and run a narrative of what I've done so far.

The bike when I brought it home



The first thing I did was strip it down to the bare frame. I happened to have an old KLR that I was parting out so I decided I wanted to put that fork on it. It took some adaptation to the triples, but it came together well.

Triples in the frame. The frame is in my bicycle work stand.



Fork in the frame and frame on the ground. The fork has been shortened to 5" of travel and had a full rebuild with fresh seals and fork boots. I'm using an MX type bar on the bike. Since the fork is still taller than the stock one and I wanted to keep the bar height close to the same I went with a smaller bar. The rear shocks that were on the bike had leaked all of their oil out a long time ago so I ordered some adjustable rear shocks from e-bay. This will be an around town putter and occasional dirt road rider so I'm not too worried about the quality (or lack there-of) of the cheap shocks. They function, and that works for me. They are also longer, so they will raise the back-end a little bit to better match the taller front end.



I'm using the front hub from the KLR and rebuilding it on the stock rim so that the bike stays with 18" wheels front and rear. I ordered spokes from Woody's and decided to strip both wheels down and paint the rims and hubs.



You know that phrase "never enough time to do it right, always enough time to do it twice?" Yeah, that applies to me. I painted the rims using the best mix of paint I could find for the job and thinking that the tires would go on smoothly. Here is one of the rims mid-paint job



Of course the tires didn't go on smoothly, so I had to strip the paint and start over. I really wanted black rims so I grabed my Harbor Freight powdercoating gun that I'd bought a year and a half ago and never used and decided to figure it out. I needed an oven to bake the rims in so I bought sheet metal, insulation, and two heat lamps and rivited something together. Surprisingly... it worked. I was able to get the oven up to 400 deg so the powder would flow.
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09' KLR650
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71' Yamaha CT1 (bastardization in progress)

coloradogoose screwed with this post 04-04-2014 at 09:03 AM
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Old 04-04-2014, 08:52 AM   #2
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I decided on a 200CC Zongshen engine to put in the bike. It's a CG200 which is a copy of the Honda CG150 engines that they've been putting out for a long time and are still made. (Though there have been several incarnations over the years) It's an OHV motor and is not fancy in any way. It is kick and electric start and I pulled it out of a Chinese dirt bike that I found on Craigslist for really cheap. While it may seem blasphemous to some that I'm putting a chinese engine in a Japanese bike, It's what I could afford. With all the research I've done about the engine the people who bash it are folks that just hear "chinese" and think "crap." Most of the people who have actually owned this motor say that they don't have much power, but they run forever. That's fine with me.



To get the motor in the bike I had to do some frame work. Absolutely none of the motor mounts matched up, which wasn't a surprise. The exhaust outlet was in the way of one of the frame members so I did some cutting and welding. The motor was a stressed member in the chinese frame and I may be using it the same in this one since I needed to cut out the bottom of the frame to get it to fit. Here is the frame with the new frame member welded in. It is bent to allow the exhaust to exit. You can also see the wheels all finished and on the bike.



With my new found amateur ability to powdercoat I decided on a color for the bike and went about powdercoating parts. Here is the back of the headlight.



So, we're all caught up. I've got two of the five motor mounts done. All of the large parts of the bike have been powdercoated, and I can roll it around the garage. Next, I'll be powdercoating some of the small parts like the rear rack, kickstart lever, shifter lever, and the like. I'll be adding in the last three motor mounts, which should go much more smoothly than the first two. I'll also be adding a skid plate of some kind. That should be a fun fabricating project.

Here is the bike with the tank and seat sitting on it. The seat is original and is now torn apart due to the foam being very deteriorated. I'm rebuilding the foam and will likely make the seat a little thinner to give it more of a scrambler look.

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09' KLR650
03' Super Sherpa
88' KLR650 (waiting to be reassembled)
71' Yamaha CT1 (bastardization in progress)

coloradogoose screwed with this post 04-05-2014 at 06:45 PM
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Old 04-05-2014, 05:07 PM   #3
danster
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This is a great idea and something I have thought about a bunch, my intention was to use a xt250 or 350 engine.
I think it was one of the best looking bikes.

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Old 04-06-2014, 04:59 AM   #4
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We're watching...
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Old 04-06-2014, 05:00 AM   #5
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That's pretty cool. Powder coating is addictive
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Old 04-06-2014, 09:51 AM   #6
Wolfshirt
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Please post a picture of your powdercoat oven. Bike looks great so far.
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Old 04-06-2014, 09:08 PM   #7
coloradogoose OP
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Danster, I wanted to use something from a nice little Japanese bike, but couldn't find anything in my area that was affordable. I live in the middle of nowhere, and the tradeoffs are that deals on bikes are few and far between. What I really wanted to use was a ninja 250 motor, but that wasn't going to happen in my budget.

Yeah Sailah, powder coating is super addictive! It's cheaper than paint and is far tougher. I'll probably just keep black powder loaded in my gun so I can coat stuff whenever I feel like it.

Scuba, it's nice to know someone is watching. Small displacement bikes don't get the attention that sportster builds do.

Here is what I got done this weekend. Lots of time with the powder coating gun. Some was done in the homemade oven and the small bits were done in a $20 toaster oven from Walmart. I also tacked on two of the remaining three motor mounts. The last mount will require more metal so I'll work on that next weekend. I didn't take pics of the mounts because my welds suck and I'm embarrassed by them.

And as requested by wolfshirt, pics of the homemade oven. It's pretty shoddy, but it works. When I get my workshop finished I'll build something bigger and nicer using old oven elements. I'd like to be able to fit a frame in a big oven. I'll keep the toaster oven for the small bits.

Here are the coated items from this weekend. The shifter lever and kick lever aren't in there because I'd already taken them in the house to re-install the rubber, but I did those as well. All of these pieces were silver to start with and most were pretty pitted with over 40 years of rust. The powder smoothed that right out.


Oven closed and cooking


Part of the front fender brace that just got powdered and is about to cook.


I'm surprised how well the heat lamps work. They take longer to get to temp so I need to leave pieces in for longer than the toaster oven, but that's not a big deal.
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09' KLR650
03' Super Sherpa
88' KLR650 (waiting to be reassembled)
71' Yamaha CT1 (bastardization in progress)

coloradogoose screwed with this post 04-06-2014 at 09:18 PM
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Old 04-15-2014, 07:38 PM   #8
bluestar
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I'm in. This should be an interesting build.
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Old 04-16-2014, 01:12 PM   #9
Superzoom
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The makeshift oven is brilliant! BRILLIANT!!!
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Old 08-14-2014, 11:07 PM   #10
coloradogoose OP
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Been a while

So, it's been a bit since I've updated. Since it's summer I've been riding rather than tinkering. My wife is also a week away from the due date of our first child, so most time spent on the weekends is assembling furniture, cleaning, and painting.
I've gotten a little work done though. I'll try to get some pics this weekend. I've cut all of the extra tabs off of the frame and finished welding on the new motor mounts. I have changed the direction of what I want it to look like, so I'll be stripping all the powdercoat that I did on the fenders, chopping them up, and re-coating them. I've pulled the wiring loom and am making changes to that to make the bike a kick-start only with a battery delete capacitor. The seat is shaved and the subframe has been hacked so I can shorten it.
My hope for this weekend (if we don't have a baby popping out) is to finish the sub-frame, weld on new fork stops, and weld on some threaded studs for mounting points. (Saw that idea in another thread on here) Then it'll be taking everything off the frame and painting it. Once that is done I can drop the motor in and start the assembly process. There will still be tons of details to figure out as I go, all while hanging out with a new baby, so it's still gonna be a while, but I can start to see a light waaaaay at the end of the tunnel.
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Old 08-17-2014, 12:11 PM   #11
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Need some suggestions from the collective

Update from this weekend so far and a request for opinions.

I cut the extra length out of the subframe, welded the curve back in place, then spent some time with the grinder to get it looking better. Post #2 has a pic of what it looked like before.



Then I chopped up the old rear fender. I took the brace off the top, shortened the whole thing, and rounded off the ends. Since this required that I remove all the old mounting points I decided to weld two nuts to the subframe. The new fender is small and light so two bolts should do it.
Now I am wanting suggestions on the front fender. I am no longer going for a specific look with this bike. I'm combining elements of what works and what I like the look of, so I'm not worried about what "traditional" scrambler looks like. Since I chopped the rear fender, I plan to shorten the front. What I'm wondering is how much should I chop it, should I do a high mount or a low mount? This bike is not likely to get used off-road much at all, which would point to low mount, however I wonder if the high mount would match the look of the rear fender better.

Here is a pic of where it is at so far. As you can see there will be no air box, and the triangle in front of the rear tire will stay mostly, if not completely open. I plan to run the exhaust around and straight back. It will be black, and I'll probably wrap it with black fiberglass tape since it will be in a spot where it could burn a leg. Thoughts?

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88' KLR650 (waiting to be reassembled)
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Old 08-17-2014, 04:12 PM   #12
Fiftygrit
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I really like the way this looks, I had an old DT1 it was kind of small for my 6' 1" 200lb frame but it sure was fun, I think this will be great with the 4 stroke motor, keep up the good work, oh ya what temp do you need for the powder coating, I have an old cabinet with heat lamps, but only goes up to about 105 deg, cheer`s
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:14 AM   #13
coloradogoose OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiftygrit View Post
I really like the way this looks, I had an old DT1 it was kind of small for my 6' 1" 200lb frame but it sure was fun, I think this will be great with the 4 stroke motor, keep up the good work, oh ya what temp do you need for the powder coating, I have an old cabinet with heat lamps, but only goes up to about 105 deg, cheer`s

Thanks, I'm looking forward to the final product, but the process sure is fun.
400 degrees F is what most of my powder requires. I use an oven thermometer to check the temp. I much prefer the toaster over for small parts, and if I could get my hands on an old electric oven I would use that instead of the make-shift one, but it's working in a pinch.

Any opinions from anyone on a high-mount vs. low-mount front fender?
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:34 AM   #14
bogieboy
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very nice build.... and as the owner of a supermoto converted chinese bike, the engines are bulletproof...same engine ass mine, you may be surprised if you have a free flowing exhaust and decent gearing what these little engines can do....


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oymf0rP30TU

FMF powercore 2 and a UNI pod filter, rejetted carb and ninja 250 wheels....
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:42 AM   #15
Racerrrx
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I was wondering why you didn't just use the oven in the house then I saw something about "wife"

I've powdercoated quite a bit- 375F is the cure temp for most powders. Go to Harbor Freight and get a cheap laser therm. and go for 375 on the metal part instead of measuring oven temp.

Bike looks good!
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