ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Face plant
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-26-2014, 08:17 AM   #181
husqvarna
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2007
Location: Darkest Efrika
Oddometer: 128
Inspiring

Good thread. I'm 59 and have just started rehab after a bloody mountain bike get off cost me 3 broken ribs, punctured lung and broken clavicle 10 days ago. Dangerous things push bikes.

I miss riding like crazy and after a week in hospital I can see myself at least starting the dirt bikes.

I've ridden since 14, suffered wrecked knee, a few crushed vertebrae and sundry finger and foot damage. I hope I can get back asap. No thought of giving up. Please no. As Meatloaf says; "anything but that".
husqvarna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2014, 10:40 AM   #182
wizze
Wizze = Wise
 
wizze's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Renton, WA
Oddometer: 966
I'm currently watching Through the Wormhole. The discussion was about perception of reality. A guy, who rides, was asked what his chance of being killed on his motorycle was. He guessed very low but the actual number is 37 times more likely than in a car. He was a smoker too. His guess was also very low and his actual chance was 3 times more likely. People, knowing the truth but ignore it, have the "won't happen to me I'm special" mentality. I guess when your perception catches up to reality then it's time to evaluate your life. People die everyday from every reason. Living in a bubble of fear is no life at all IMO. No matter what it's terminal.
__________________
2009 BMW F800GS
2009 Yamaha FZ-1 Retro (for sale)
2012 KTM 500 EXC
2005 BMW R1200RT
Is that it?
wizze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2014, 02:30 PM   #183
eakins
Butler Maps
 
eakins's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado
Oddometer: 17,528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arctic Orange View Post
Several months back my 85 year old dad called it quits. He low-sided his 2012 HD Dyna in a slow 35 mph curve. Last thing he remembered was watching the front tire near the fog line, then looks up at a para-medic standing above him. Good thing he started wearing a full face instead of the Harley 1/2 shell! Face sheild and chin bar took a beating for him!

1 week in hospital and 6 in assisted living/rehab. Dad had been riding since the late 30's, it was hard to believe it when he said the Dyna was for sale.
His choice alone, no pressure from any body else. "You chose wisely" Dad.
maybe he just needs to downsize to a lighter bike or scooter.
older & weaker folks with unreal heavy HD bikes just doesn't work.
there is a reason burgman 400 abs are so popular.
__________________
Butler Maps - motorcycle maps for riders by riders -
Alaska
AZ map COBDR AZBDR IDBDR South East map
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=598717
Butler Maps website:
http://www.butlermaps.com
eakins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2014, 02:46 PM   #184
easyrider88
POsIng PrO
 
easyrider88's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: milwaukee,wisconsin
Oddometer: 282
not this year

im 61 and have been motorcycling since 1970.my first bike was a 1967 Yamaha 250 cc two stroke kick start.
__________________
1997 triumph trophy 1200
easyrider88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2014, 02:47 PM   #185
Mr Head
PowerPoint ADV
 
Mr Head's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2003
Location: Orange County, CA
Oddometer: 6,728
Statistics are not the truth. They are a very rough guess when applied to specific individuals who may not happen to fit so neatly into the box from which the numbers were drawn.

If things work out I'll be 61 this summer. If not. Oh well it has been a nice ride. I've only ridden for a bit shy of 40 years now. Almost all of that riding to work for travel for fun, for trackdays and sometimes for work.
One thing I noticed a while ago. Maybe ten years or so. I have very few close calls anymore. That is not because I am gaming the system by not riding. In the last 17 years I've ridden three motorcycles beyond 100,000 miles. One of them to near 200,000.
Sadly most of that mileage is commuting across Orange County California in Southern California rush hour traffic.
Yes I split lanes. Yes, I exceed the posted limit.
Yes, I leave extra room, don't let my eyes stop moving. I don't text or screw with a GPS or music player while I ride. I just ride and pay attention everything for as far around me as I can see in all directions.
Everyday I avoid at least one car/truck/SUV/minivan partially piloted by someone more intent on other things than driving. They never get close enough for it to be a close call.

So, it won't be a close call that tells me its time to quit.
For me it will be my body telling me. Specifically my knees and back. Well, one knee in particular and a small birth defect in my bike will eventually get to the point that yoga won't help the pain. And the ride won't any longer be worth the pain.
That is what did it for skiing and me. And ice hockey. I got to the point where the knee pain was greater and lasted longer than the time skiing and playing hockey. There was the money side of it too. I grew up skiing. Lived for it. My entire teenaged years were focused on skiing. In high school I dropped dates off early on Friday night because I was skiing the next day.
I made the mistake of going skiing with a girl once in high school. I think we got three runs in, between toilet stops, warming stops, eating and make up. She owned gear mommy and daddy had bought, I owned gear I mowed lawns to buy on close out.

Of course then I met my wife a few years later and found a soul mate who figured we could eat after they threw us off the mountain.
If she asked I'd stop riding. She cares enough about me not to ask.

So two stops for me. Either my body or my wife. I suspect my body will give up first. It has had a hard life and will deserve the rest.
Some kid will get a deal on a high mileage 990R.
__________________
...Richard
" you may not be able to fix it with a hammer, but you'll damned sure teach it a lesson" - Anon
2010 KTM 990 Adventure R
Smugmug
Mr Head is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2014, 03:32 PM   #186
eakins
Butler Maps
 
eakins's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado
Oddometer: 17,528
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackx70 View Post
42. A youngin in this crowd, I guess.
44 years here. Been riding since I was 13 (moped).
I wear all the gear, have had training & practice my riding skills all the time.

I feel my best years of touring are ahead of me as our daughter (1 kid only) is getting older. I'm not needed as much to help out (she's more self-sufficient) plus work is more seasonal (love that! no idea how I ever did the 2 week off only lifestyle all those year. sucks the life out of you).
We also plan to travel more as a family.

As for quitting, I have no concept of that now. If I need to ride a 50cc powered ultra-light bike in the forest away from everyone so be it, I will to keep going. I love anything with 2 wheels (also a mountain bike freak too) and will peruse that.
__________________
Butler Maps - motorcycle maps for riders by riders -
Alaska
AZ map COBDR AZBDR IDBDR South East map
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=598717
Butler Maps website:
http://www.butlermaps.com
eakins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2014, 03:32 PM   #187
eakins
Butler Maps
 
eakins's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado
Oddometer: 17,528
I also bring up he white elephant in the room. Health and taking care of yourself early & late in life. We eat very well & exercise/yoga daily. I'm talking a ton of organic fruits & vegetables, organic brown rice & quinoa, tofu, fresh juiced veggies, smoothies, greens & salads, wild-caught fish, etc. No red meat, nitrate sausages, bacons, excessive fats sugars or salts, no soda, fructose corn syrups, fast food and all the other bad crap out there.

I see ALOT of ride reports of guys showing off there greasy meat & potato meals or burgers & fries. Guess what all that if fun until your body gives out. You are fat, bald, over weight & cancer and death are knocking too early. You need to quit riding because you did not take care of yourself and it's too late. Sure there are stories of older folks not taking care of themselves and still doing just fine. Their food supply was much better & nutrient rich in there earlier years than what we have now. You must choose well these days.
__________________
Butler Maps - motorcycle maps for riders by riders -
Alaska
AZ map COBDR AZBDR IDBDR South East map
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=598717
Butler Maps website:
http://www.butlermaps.com
eakins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2014, 04:16 PM   #188
greyplague
Greyplague
 
greyplague's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Belgium, Antwerp region
Oddometer: 24
Wicked

I'm retiring the first of may, becoming 65. Good thing the plant I'm working
at (waste disposal with energy recuperation ) allows me to stay on parttime.Good thing: I'll be riding some more, I'll throw in the towel when the body sez stop Keeping fit means keeping active, eating sensible and accepting I'm not immortal. Guys, the whole thing ia a trip. Getting to the end of it does'nt matter. Have a good time on the way!
Thieu.
__________________
Whatever doesn't kill me makes me older.
greyplague is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2014, 04:29 PM   #189
jehu
∩HƏſ
 
jehu's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Vail,AZ
Oddometer: 3,629
I turned 64 Feb 10th while riding my XRR in Baja. I've been riding for 51 years now. I've had a lot of baad accidents. Grew up in Albuquerque and I'm familiar with sand. I've long had the theory that faster is better in the lose stuff and decided to test it. Well, it starts to get kind of iffy around 85 mph (with 50 lbs of gear on board).
__________________
Gran Canyon, XR650R, CB77, V7 Sport, Hodaka
jehu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 06:54 AM   #190
O.C.F.RIDER
Loose nut behind h/bars
 
O.C.F.RIDER's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: Hewitt,New Jerseystan, OBAMANATION
Oddometer: 4,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by jehu View Post
I turned 64 Feb 10th while riding my XRR in Baja. I've been riding for 51 years now. I've had a lot of baad accidents. Grew up in Albuquerque and I'm familiar with sand. I've long had the theory that faster is better in the lose stuff and decided to test it. Well, it starts to get kind of iffy around 85 mph (with 50 lbs of gear on board).
My 950S felt fine at 110mph (GPS max speed recorded) at the Sandblast Rally, DEEP sand in NC.

64 and still rippin' it up? My hats off to you buddy, and I hope I'm still doing the same at 64.

Chris
__________________
http://www.theshining.info/
KTM 950 Adv. "S"...'06 KTM 525 EXC...
'76 MV Agusta 750 America S...'84 Honda VF1000...
'75 Kawi 900 Z1...'90 Kawi ZX11...'03 Kawi ZRX 1200...'01 VOR 400E
O.C.F.RIDER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 08:29 AM   #191
ObiJohn
Screaming Banshee
 
ObiJohn's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Seattle suburbia
Oddometer: 484
As someone who came to motorcycling a bit later in life, I think the decision to start or stop riding is closely related to the reason many of us (if not all of us) ride in the first place.

Motorcycling is dangerous, but I think that's a major part of the appeal. For me at least, the thrill of riding is connected to the danger. Certainly everyone who has ever gone way fast has gotten the thrill that comes from being on the edge, whether it's on a bike, a fast car, or a fast plane. And, a major component of that thrill is fear. I have several motorcycles, but the one that scares me the most is my FJR1300. It's big, heavy, and very fast... and those factors make it a handful. My CRF230L dual sport and my DN-01 are veritable toys in terms of the challenge of riding them. I ride the FJR enough to ensure that I can adequately control it in urban driving/traffic, but I can never truly be relaxed on it because I know it will bite me. Nevertheless, hopping on the FJR for a quick 20-mile ride up the freeway and back is exhilarating in a way that I don't get on the other bikes.

The DN-01 was my first large-displacement street bike, and I deliberately chose it because of it's benign nature. I've had it for a couple of years, and love to ride it around town and on short jaunts. Because of the design of the bike, it's very easy to ride and it's relaxing and very pleasant... but not thrilling. Take it up to interstate speeds, and without a fairing I have to hold on and lean forward... and the bike will carve well and starts to get thrilling. But nowhere near the kick I get when I drop down to third and hit the throttle on the FJR at 60 mph, and zoom to 90 in a couple of seconds.

I get a similar thrill when riding my 230 off-road on challenging trails... fear that is overcome by accomplishment. I've thought about getting a more capable dual sport, but until I've overcome the fear I'm not ready, and I may never be ready.

I think riding motorcycles really is an exercise in courage. You have to keep your fear in check, and you have to keep yourself under control even if things feel like they're going south... no pause button on a moving motorcycle. And that is the definition of courage: overcoming fear instead of absence of fear. But, as the saying goes, fatigue makes cowards of us all. If you have too much stress in your life from other factors, riding may become more of a burden than a relief. That is when you hang it up, for as long as it takes. Or you find another motorcycle, one that is less demanding.
__________________
Everything is on its way to somewhere...
ObiJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 08:47 AM   #192
DougFromKentucky
Old Fart
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Bowling Green, Kentucky
Oddometer: 404
I started riding early (11 years old) and continued until my son was born. My wife and I discussed my riding and we decided that I would stop until he was raised. She didn't want to be a widow raising a child, I agreed that this could easily happen with me riding. His sophomore year of high school I talked again with her as my desire to ride had not reduced any during my time out of the saddle. I got another bike and resumed after a MSF course to sharpen my skills after so many years of not riding. Now more years later, at 62, she understands that if the worst should happen on my motorcycle and I get killed on it, I will die doing the one thing in my life that has always brought me joy. I will die a happy man. I am a big "quality of life" believer and with many medical problems and 4 heart attacks in my past I am not afraid of dieing. Sometimes the risk is worth the reward.

Namaste'
Doug from Kentucky
__________________
2009 Suzuki Burgman 650 Executive, 1980 Honda Express NC50, 2007 Suzuki Wee-Strom (sold)

USMC 1970-1978: HMH-463 Evacuation of Saigon - April 1975, Evacuation of Phnom Phen during the Killing Fields Spring of 1975
DougFromKentucky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 01:33 PM   #193
Unleaded
Unit Train
 
Unleaded's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Location: Hellinois
Oddometer: 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by ObiJohn View Post

I think riding motorcycles really is an exercise in courage. You have to keep your fear in check, and you have to keep yourself under control even if things feel like they're going south... no pause button on a moving motorcycle. And that is the definition of courage: overcoming fear instead of absence of fear. But, as the saying goes, fatigue makes cowards of us all. If you have too much stress in your life from other factors, riding may become more of a burden than a relief. That is when you hang it up, for as long as it takes. Or you find another motorcycle, one that is less demanding.
Good post - very well thought-out response.
__________________
www.thehurricanedeck.com
Unleaded is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 02:14 PM   #194
WRW9751
Gnarly Adventurer
 
WRW9751's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Ankeny Iowa
Oddometer: 337
You are a Wise Man ObiJohn

I think riding motorcycles really is an exercise in courage. You have to keep your fear in check, and you have to keep yourself under control even if things feel like they're going south... no pause button on a moving motorcycle. And that is the definition of courage: overcoming fear instead of absence of fear. But, as the saying goes, fatigue makes cowards of us all. If you have too much stress in your life from other factors, riding may become more of a burden than a relief. That is when you hang it up, for as long as it takes. Or you find another motorcycle, one that is less demanding. __________________
Very well said! I will when its time look hard at light weight rides. For now let'er Rip!
WRW9751 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 06:23 PM   #195
G is for Guiness
Mr. n00b to you sir!
 
G is for Guiness's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: DFW Airport - That would be Texas!
Oddometer: 43
If you love to ride, ride.

Been riding since I was 16, rode all the time, so 10 years later when I hit a car head on @ 60 miles per hour, everything changed. When I woke up the ER Doctor said not to move I was most likely paralyzed. A sobering moment, I prayed a lot for about 30 minutes, making deals with the Almighty. Never ride a bike again sort of promises... Thankfully it ended up I broke a few teeth and spent two days in the ICU with major pain and walked out the hospital after 7 days. Sold the bike and did not ride for 5 years......
Then one fine Spring Saturday morning sitting in a Cargo van with my brother. Had a bunch of big helium balloons in the van to deliver to a wedding. I watched two guys pulled up on Harley's, laughing, obviously starting a great weekend ride. It hit me I missed riding so very much but I made a vow to God I would not ride if he let me walk again. I turned to my older brother and asked very seriously if God would mind if I started riding again. Well right after my brothers mouth opened but before he spoke one of the balloons exploded in the back. We both launched from our seats and looked at each other with wild eye shock. My brother said "well there's your answer." Some people would have said it was a sign of no, I said he must have meant YES!!! Bought a bike later that day, been twenty years, own a bunch of bikes. My take away is you can't be anything but what you are. If you love to ride, ride.
G is for Guiness is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 03:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014