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Old 08-23-2012, 06:49 PM   #16
bbishoppcm
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I'm working on a video showing the steps needed to replace every light bulb in the Honda Helix's dashboard and turn signals.
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:46 PM   #17
Warney
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I've fixed a few cars, Trucks, MC's, and Scooters but am not a professional mechanic. Usually I bought an oddball brand or rare model of whatever, a weakness of mine. I've some Snap On tools and even for a hobbyist they are worth the extra money for certain items. Good tools pay for themselves over and over, cheap ones are a pita.
If you can read and follow instructions from a Service manual, you can maintain and repair your Scooter. Even complex mechanical issues can be dealt with; thanks to the internet someone has your answer. If you have a Vespa or Piaggio product, modernvespa has the 411, totalruckus has most/all Honda answers.
MIC tools are generally of inferior quality and almost sure to disappoint. Tools from Taiwan are a cut above and sometimes equal to higher quality better brands. German, Swiss, Japanese coo are usually very good quality.
Strip out a few things with the MIC junk and you will discover with tools, you get what you pay for.
When in doubt, consult garagejournal.com, it is the ADV of tools. That place will cost you a lot of $$$. Check the free parking, general tool discussion, hot deals, and for sale sections. You'll either thank or cuss me.
Good tools you buy once and use for a lifetime, then someone else inherits them.
If your Scooter is of Japanese or other Asian origin, you need a set of JIS screwdrivers as these fasteners differ from a standard philips. Never know where one will pop up, lots on Keihin Carburetors. They are not all marked either. I have an inexpensive set of Hozan JIS Screwdrivers from Japan, they work great.
http://www.webbikeworld.com/motorcyc...-screwdrivers/
No you don't need Snap-On quality but if you have a lot of screws to remove, a Snap On Ratcheting Screwdriver is well worth the coin. There are a lot of bits available @ $1.65 each and they are of highest USA quality.
There is a Snap On Industrial brand (Williams) which is virtually the same screwdriver with the same ratcheting mechanism for less money.
http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item....re&dir=catalog
http://www.amazon.com/Williams-WRS-1...ref=pd_cp_hi_0
That ratcheting mechanism is licensed to several other screwdriver manufacturers worldwide, it's that good.
Craftsman Screwdrivers are of lesser quality, JH Williams or Wiha Screwdrivers are of much higher quality and worth it too. You will notice the difference each and every time they are used. JH Williams are a clone of the classic Snap-On hard handle, arguably the finest USA screwdriver ever made; Wiha have metal striking caps and are of superb quality. Both have wrenchable shanks.
http://toolguyd.com/williams-5pc-har...driver-set-27/
http://www.wihatools.com/500seri/530serie.htm
Craftsman tools are not what they once were, not in every case, lots of MIC crap with Craftsman name now.
Craftsman Raised panel wrenches, sockets, extensions, pliers, ratchets, other hand tools (USA made) are of good quality. New Craftsman tools of non-USA origin, not so much. Craftsman Pro (USA) are of very good quality.
I'm still using an old beam style torque wrench (USA), nothing has broken from using it yet.
SK Superkrome Tools are like a work of art, made in USA, superb quality, mo money.
Snap On is the professionals choice, some of their stuff like the ratcheting screwdriver is worth the money if you can spare it. Snap ring pliers? You want Snap On.
We didn't even talk about 6 or 12 point wrenches or sockets, allen wrenches, ratcheting wrenches...
Believe it or not, the Harbor Freight 44" roll cab is of very good quality as is their 5-drawer service cart.
http://www.harborfreight.com/44-13-d...net-68784.html
http://www.harborfreight.com/five-dr...art-95272.html
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:03 PM   #18
hexnut
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You are right about Craftsman. I bought a complete set of tools from Craftsman in the 80s including their best screw driver set.The ones you get today do not even come close.
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:11 PM   #19
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GREAT thread!..I bought a Chinese scooter. And yes, I like it. BUT! You better know how to turn a wrench. I did the usual PDI. Changed ALL the vacuum lines and fuel lines. Changed the fuel filter and made sure the gas tank was clean....I won't go on and on. The most important thing on Chinese scoots is, you learn quickly how "soft" some of the fasteners are. You can strip, or break them, on occasion, rather easily. My contribution to this thread would be: When you strip the head of a screw or a bolt, use a Dremel Tool to make a (new) wide slot, then use a large screw driver to remove the stripped screw or bolt......I changed as many nuts, bolts and screws as I can with higher quality hardware, for a few dollars. This will save me from future problems....OH, on a Chinese scooter, I mentioned you need to know how to turn a wrench, but you DON'T need to be a master mechanic. The rewards you get from doing your own work really gives you a sense of "ownership". You'll be surprised at how much you can do.
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:12 PM   #20
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thanks Klaviator and everybody for this DIY tread. I am mechanically retard but I want to change that. So I will start ones my warranty expires (1 more service of 20-30 USD)

Thanks people!!
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:49 PM   #21
fullmetalscooter
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I forget what the name of the guy is but if you gooogle free motorcycle repair course one old guy has it posted on line. cover the basics.
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Old 08-24-2012, 03:22 AM   #22
Forde
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klaviator View Post
If you do nothing else, you should be able to do this. Here are the basics.

Basically and oil change consists of removing the drain plug from the bottom of the engine, letting the oil drain out, replacing the plug, then pouring fresh oil into the appropriate opening at the top.

9. Tighten the bolts. I do this by feel but if in doubt, buy or borrow a torque wrench to tighten them. If you over tighten the bolt you could strip out the threads in the case and end up needing expensive repairs. If you leave it too loose it could fall out.

10. Pour in fresh oil. You owners manual should tell you how much oil is needed and how to measure it. I like to pour in a little less than specified and then measure it with the dipstick.
.
just wanted to add that when you are draining your oil you should always have the filler cap removed!

also agree with point 9 do NOT overtighten your drain bolt. and if you have a twist on type oil filter it should only be hand tight. the removal tools you buy are just that. for removal only. (do scooters even have those mine are all 2 stroke lol, 4t scoots probly use the paper element type?). if you dont do much mechanical stuff and arent sure about doing it by feel then definitely a small torque wrench would be a wise and cheap investment for this and many other tasks!


and point 10 is very important always pour in less than specified amount of the oil, then add small amounts and keep checking the dipstick! overfilling causes serious damage! if you just go ahead and dump in the exact amount the manual states, even if carefully measured you will probably have overfilled due to residuals etc.
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Old 08-24-2012, 03:25 AM   #23
Forde
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warney View Post
WARNING
Do not use screwdrivers as prybars, chisels or punches.



i LOL'd


my screwdrivers are used as those things more than as screwdrivers haha
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Old 08-24-2012, 06:23 AM   #24
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I don't think you use an expensive ratcheting screw driver as a pry bar. I wouldn't.
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Old 08-24-2012, 06:58 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damasovi View Post
thanks Klaviator and everybody for this DIY tread. I am mechanically retard but I want to change that. So I will start ones my warranty expires (1 more service of 20-30 USD)

Thanks people!!
Damasovi
Some people have natural mechanical ability, and some don't. My dad is one of those people who can build or fix just about anything. Unfortunately, I inherited my mechanical abilities form my mom. Just like I will never be able to ride like Valentino Rossi, I will never be able to spin wrenches like his mechanic. However, through practice I have learned how to do most of my own maintenance. It not only saves money but is often much less of a hassle to do it myself than to take it to a dealer, drop it off, then have to come back later to pick it up. Plus there is a certain sense of satisfaction form doing it myself.

If I can do it, so can you.
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Old 08-24-2012, 07:12 AM   #26
klaviator OP
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Thanks for all the replies and the extra information.

I would like to add something on tools. If it seemed like I was trying to push cheap Chinese tools, I am not. However, I bought some cheap tools almost two years ago because I wanted a second set but didn't want to spend too much when I already had a pretty complete set of tools. So far I have used them to do multiple oil changes, valve adjustments, and even a belt, roller, and sliding block replacement. None of the tools have let me down so far nor have I ruined any fasteners.

I have mainly used them on my two new scooters. The fasteners on these scooters where (and still are) in good shape and appear to have been properly torqued at the factory. With an old scooter with fasteners that have just fuzed with age, been over tightened, or damaged, it becomes more important to have good tools. Also, even with a new scooter, if the dealer has been servicing it, it's not uncommon for the mechanics to over tighten stuff because they are in a hurry. Then it becomes a pita to remove those fasteners and again, quality tools will work better.

Many damaged fasteners are caused by inexperience and/or using the wrong tool.

As someone mentioned, a good set of tools will last a lifetime. If you can afford them, go for it. On the other hand, If you are on a budget, have no tools and want to get started on some basic maintenance, you can get by with cheap tools. Since they are pretty cheap, you won't be out that much money if you replace them at a later time and they can still be used as spares.

Last, not all cheap Chinese tools are the same. I compared the Durabilt tools at Target with the cheap stuff at Wally World and the Durabilt tools seem much better. They are way better than the junk that comes in most motorcycle/scooter toolkits.....that is if your scooter even came with any tools.

I'm no Tool expert but that's my opinion.
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Old 08-24-2012, 07:13 AM   #27
hexnut
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My dad couldn't change a spark plug if he could have found them. I have good mechanical ability. I guess I got it from growing up poor and not being able to pay some one to work on my bikes and cars.

I built many bikes back in the 60s and 70s, then restored British roadsters (Triumphs) and showed then all over the south east US winning two national titles for cars I built.

I have gotten old and my skills have some what fell by the way side but I can still fix what ever goes wrong on my scooter or my truck. It just takes me a little longer. And it used to be fun and recreational but thats not true any more. I don't enjoy it like I used to . I guess ajent orange and arthritis have caught up with me. Plus my memory is not what it used to be. Its still on my hard drive but my recall fails way too much.

Oh yeah I got just about every tool I will ever need and then some.
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Old 08-24-2012, 07:32 AM   #28
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Re: Craftsman screw drivers, they have gotten so bad, especially the Phillips, that I try and make it a point to change them after a few uses. Leads to less slippage and damaged screw heads.

Probably should just buy good ones, but being a cheap SOB, I just use the free exchange policy.

I've also noticed over the years, certain Craftsman sockets have gotten thicker, which leads me to believe the metal has gotten weaker, read cheaper.

I would also add if you're doing your own work on a bike under warranty, keep a record of what you're doing, with dates and mileage, and receipts with corresponding dates.
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Old 08-24-2012, 07:43 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedo66 View Post
Re: Craftsman screw drivers, they have gotten so bad, especially the Phillips, that I try and make it a point to change them after a few uses. Leads to less slippage and damaged screw heads.

Probably should just buy good ones, but being a cheap SOB, I just use the free exchange policy.

I've also noticed over the years, certain Craftsman sockets have gotten thicker, which leads me to believe the metal has gotten weaker, read cheaper.

I would also add if you're doing your own work on a bike under warranty, keep a record of what you're doing, with dates and mileage, and receipts with corresponding dates.
I have some old Craftsman screw drivers(over 30 years old). I never thought they were that great. The screw driver that came in my cheap Durabilt tool kit (one screw driver handle with multiple bits) actually works much better.
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Old 08-24-2012, 03:47 PM   #30
Warney
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http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...0070921x00003c
This is a decent deal on decent tools, found on slickdeals via garagejournal.com, there may be additional discounts available. Better hurry.
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