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Old 08-30-2012, 10:42 AM   #16
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No news to report. Met with the electrician yesterday and went over the game plan. I need to dig the trench 3" deeper to meet code. Bleh... I'm sick of digging.

But I get to play with chipping power tools this weekend!
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Old 08-30-2012, 10:53 AM   #17
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I need to dig the trench 3" deeper to meet code. But I get to play with chipping power tools this weekend!

Good on you for not being "that guy" who says, "Eh. Close enough."
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Old 08-30-2012, 11:15 AM   #18
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Good on you for not being "that guy" who says, "Eh. Close enough."
I was tempted but I want it done right. Considering what was done before: I think I had it dug well enough, but we got two massive monsoon storms and the entire trench filled up with water and mud. When it settled...
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:12 PM   #19
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Purchased a hammer drill on sale last night. Tried it out and in the 10-seconds I used it, I chipped up twice the amount of floor mortar/crap than I did by hand. That 300sq ft will be down to bare concrete in a few hours tomorrow.
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:37 PM   #20
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I agree with the temporary support wall. Tack down a plate on the floor and screw one onto the ceiling. If you can get the ceiling plate onto exposed framing it's better. Cut the vertical studs a little longer than needed ( up to half an inch) and sledge them plumb. Run a horizontal stud across and tack it into the vertical studs to hold them This will jack you up enough to sawzall out the nails and bolts holding the plate down. Mark the new plate in place before you sawzall so all studs go back in the same place. Set your new treated plate, installs anchor bolts every 36 or 48 inches into your concrete floor, drop the retaining wall, and toe nail old studs into new place. Easy peasy
Just thinking about this... I realize I will have to support the roof on both sides of the wall at the same time, won't I? The weight of the guest-house side roof will still be on the wall even if I lift off the weight of the garage side. Crap... simple but I'm going to have to buy a bit of lumber to do this!
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Old 08-31-2012, 05:37 PM   #21
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lolly columns

maybe a few temp. lally columns. We use them when we had to support my mother 80 year house to repair the brick columns.

A lally column is round thin walled structural steel column oriented vertically to provide support to beams or timbers stretching over long spans. A lally column is filled with concrete to prevent buckling. The advantage of a lally column over conventional structural steel is the ability to cut it to length on a construction site with simple hand tools such as a plumber’s pipe cutter. Lally columns are generally not as strong or durable as conventional structural steel columns. The term “lally column” is sometimes incorrectly used in reference to other types of prefabricated steel columns.
The lally column is named after a U. S. inventor, John Lally, who owned a construction company that started production of these columns in the late 19th century. He resided in Waltham, Massachusetts and Boston during the period 1898 through 1907. He was issued four U. S. Patents on composite columns: #61472, #869869, #901453,and #905888. Pat. #869869 was assigned to the U. S. Column Company of Cambridge, MA.
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Old 09-01-2012, 12:13 PM   #22
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temp support walls

I can't tell from the photos if the ceiling (roof) joists run through in one piece over the wall. If they do you can support one side. If they don't you need to support both sides. Either way it's not a big deal. I don't support every 16". The key is cutting the temp wall studs long enough to sledge (hammer) them in place to get the load off the studs. If when you sawzall the nails from the old studs into the old plate you feel blade binding you don't have enough uplift.
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Old 09-01-2012, 02:58 PM   #23
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Will let you know final costs in a few days. The quote I got initially to run a new line from the main panel to a sub-panel inside the guest house was $1000 even. Labor, panel, etc. From there, I was going to run the various circuits but, while I'm comfortable with simple electric stuff, I've decided I'd rather have a professional do the whole thing, at least on the guest house side. I still haven't decided everything I want on the garage side so that will stay incomplete..
I'm contemplating a similar project, so I'd also be interested what kinds of costs you end up with. Good luck!
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Old 09-04-2012, 11:22 AM   #24
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Busy, busy 3-day weekend, and I am beat-down tired. But feeling good! My wife texted me on her way out to work saying the electricians were already there and working away, so hopefully I'll have some power when I get home tonight! I don't have a ton of photos to show, but a lot of work was done this weekend.



A very special THANK YOU to a fellow inmate here that contacted me and dropped off a couple support studs from his company. I haven't even met the guy... just chatted through PMs and texts. Great community here, for sure. You can see the supports here, along with a couple 2x4s I used to support the middle. He also dropped off a steel I-beam but the roof is so low I couldn't get the supports low enough so I used a 2x4 instead, and just did the entire length in three sections. The joists on the garage side are 2x8s and on the guest house side they're 6x6s. I went out and purchased some 2x4s and supported the 6x6s on that side, as well.





And holy cow. I'm glad I chose to replace it... the entire length was just devoured by termites. As I cut it into sections to pull out, they just disintegrated into sawdust and splinters. I have no idea how it had enough structure to still support the wall and roof weight. It also wasn't bolted into the floor at all.




At this point, I realized the drywall on the guest house side was a mess so in a fit of motivation, I tore it down as well. As I was happily swinging the sledge through the drywall, Peter Gabriel's song Sledgehammer came on my playlist. Appropriate. I also replaced a stud that originally had been cut about 1/2" too short. Not bolted down here, but I did drill and drive in 8 bolts into the concrete. Considering it stayed up for 50+ years without any, I'm sure it will be good now! Also ripped out all the old electric, and drywall is down in the "kitchen" of the guest house. Someone thought ahead in the past and ran both a hot and cold water, as well as a sewer/drain line (seen at the foot of the wall here) which I am going to use to install a shop sink in that back corner.

Due to another summer monsoon, I had to re-dig the electric trench which filled with about 3" of mud.

I initially had reserved a hammer drill to rent but found a cheapy at Harbor Freight for the same cost. I know: Crappy, cheap tools. But it allowed me to began chipping away at the horrible mortar floor in the guest house, which required me to remove the sink and toilet to get underneath them. The sink is going to be replaced anyway. Will post photos of that tomorrow. As of yesterday, I'm about 50% done chipping off the floor.... concrete underneath is in GREAT shape and I'm considering just having it polished. We'll see.

And for the negative..... As I was adjusting one section of the roof, one of the roof supports fell over and slammed into the r65. The top took a chunk out of the fiberglass area behind the seat. I have to get it all repainted anyway, but this just broke my heart.



More to come tonight!
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Old 09-04-2012, 11:33 AM   #25
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I'm contemplating a similar project, so I'd also be interested what kinds of costs you end up with. Good luck!
Thanks! We're trying to keep this as budget-friendly as possible. The biggest expense at once will be the electrical. I've also had to go out and buy a few tools to help, which has driven up the cost a bit. Will tally at the end.
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Old 09-06-2012, 09:25 AM   #26
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Electricians are finishing up this morning. I know it's going to cost a bit more but I'm glad it's done right. They told me they found quite a bit of burned wiring in the bathroom that they had to redo. Working for a couple hours each night after work on that damn floor and finally got it all up. Now I just need to go over it with a scraper and clean it up a bit. Wash/vaccuum and test for ph and moisture, and it'll be ready for some flooring, or for polishing, whatever is most cost-effective.

Here is an in-progress shot of the thinset mortar junk they put as a floor covering:
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:18 AM   #27
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Electrical is all finished! It's a bit on the industrial looking side (which azcycle-wife isn't overly thrilled with) but oh well. It's now more safe than the original wiring in the main house. Purchased a small water heater, window ac/heater unit, and mini-fridge. Lights, ordered flooring, and purchased drywall. Ordered about 50' of direct-bury underground coaxial cable since our cable box is right where all the other trenches are. Figured I might as well run the line now for a tv/computer later.

I searched for a new garage/guest house door, but decided to go with a new pre-hung door instead of trying to fit one to the old frame opening. Glad I did, because I found more termite damage in the studs on either side of the door. The electrician ran a bunch of wires just above the old door, and the new door is 1.5" taller so there wasn't enough room to run the wires the way he had drilled the holes through the studs on either side. So I had to be a bit creative when adding the new studs so the wires now pretty much lie flat against the top plate. The old door sill was basically built-up concrete so I'm going to have to hammer that out for the new door.

Tonight I'm scraping the floor smooth and installing the new door. But now I have electricity to work by light after the sun goes down!

Tomorrow night will start drywall.

For those who asked, the electrician bill came to a total of $1,700. That's running a new line from the main panel for about 40' through the wall. New 100amp sub-panel, about 6 separate circuits, new wiring, and the labor to do it all.

Photos to come later this evening.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:04 PM   #28
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Just a suggestion. As long as you have the trenches still open consider a conduit for internet and phone. A couple CAT5 cables will do it. Also a piece of COAX for the TV. Should be easy now and hard later.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:14 PM   #29
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Just a suggestion. As long as you have the trenches still open consider a conduit for internet and phone. A couple CAT5 cables will do it. Also a piece of COAX for the TV. Should be easy now and hard later.
Not too worried about the phone as we don't use landlines anymore... all mobile. I will be running some direct-bury coaxial cable for internet/cable (which we use) in said trench.
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Old 09-12-2012, 10:12 AM   #30
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Made some progress last night before I lost daylight... and the one fluorescent light in the bathroom burned out. Replaced two rotten studs, installed the new pre-hung door, and scraped the remaining mortar off the floor. Have a termite inspector coming out on Friday to treat the entire property.



Managed to install two new studs for the new door, which required me to be a little creative to make sure there was enough room for the new wiring. This was before I completed removing the top of the old stud (top left) and securing the horizontal supports.



The original door sill was just a section of built-up concrete. Drilled a bunch of holes to weaken it, then knocked it flat with the hammer chisel.



New door hung. First time I've ever done that and it was incredibly easy. The top corner shifted ever so slightly as I was securing it but it's not visually noticeable and the drywall and trim will hide the imperfection. Glad I went with an entire pre-hung rather than trying to find a door to fit the old frame.

Tonight: Drywalling begins!
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