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Old 02-07-2013, 01:31 PM   #91
Emoto
Sure, why not?
 
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Joined: Feb 2004
Location: SE Mass
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A few of my friends in Boy Scouts in the mid to late 60s had the Svea 123 so I had to be different. I got an Optimus 8R. Just like this, except
older and MUCH more used looking:



Awesome little stove that works just as well today as it did when I
bought it in 1968(?).

My newest stove is a Brunton Optimus Nova MultiFuel Expedition Stove (NLA):/brunton-optimus-nova-multifuel-expedition-stove:



No longer available (I think) but appears to use the same guts as the other current offerings.

I also have a larger Optimus Hiker, which is similar to my old 8R except a little larger with a pump on the tank. Found it on sale a few years ago for a good price, so picked one up. Haven't used it yet. Will try to get it into the rotation this year.

This is it:



Oh, and all I ever use in these is pump gasoline. Never had a problem, and my reasoning is that it means I carry a little extra fuel for the bike, if needed.
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Old 02-07-2013, 01:54 PM   #92
JohnnyTh
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Location: Norway
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emoto View Post
A few of my friends in Boy Scouts in the mid to late 60s had the Svea 123 so I had to be different. I got an Optimus 8R. Just like this, except
older and MUCH more used looking:



Awesome little stove that works just as well today as it did when I
bought it in 1968(?).

My newest stove is a Brunton Optimus Nova MultiFuel Expedition Stove (NLA):/brunton-optimus-nova-multifuel-expedition-stove:



No longer available (I think) but appears to use the same guts as the other current offerings.

I also have a larger Optimus Hiker, which is similar to my old 8R except a little larger with a pump on the tank. Found it on sale a few years ago for a good price, so picked one up. Haven't used it yet. Will try to get it into the rotation this year.

This is it:



Oh, and all I ever use in these is pump gasoline. Never had a problem, and my reasoning is that it means I carry a little extra fuel for the bike, if needed.
Thats 3 great soves you have there. All 3 is used by the Norwegian army. Take care of them and they will burn forever.
But be aware that last model have a filter inside the tube comming from the tank. This got cloged on mine, even i used camp stove fuel. Pulled the filter out and no problems after that.
How much fid you pay? I have a few for sale.
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Old 02-07-2013, 06:45 PM   #93
Robidob
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Hands down the Jet Boil with electric starter if you want a compressed gas stove.
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Old 02-08-2013, 03:34 AM   #94
jon_l
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Location: Collingwood, Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burmbuster View Post
I have been tossing my choices around a bit and have settled on carrying two stoves. An MSR Reactor and a Steverstove for simmering. For what I plan on eating, the MSR Reactor will be used for breakfast and dinner. The Steverstove will be used for dinner when I actually want to "cook".
Why carry 2 stoves?

Steverstoves don't simmer very well, though there is one that is designed with different hole patterns to improve this. And you can raise the pot higher to reduce heat. Burn time is limited to the 10 or 12 minutes from 1-1/2 or 2 oz of alcohol, then you refill.

I have an MSR Superfly cannister stove, and it is the best simmering stove I ever saw used, and I have camped a lot. The Steverstove is great for what it is (I have one), but it isn't the one to do gourmet cooking on. Boils water great, lightweight, cheap.

I only carry the alcohol stove when I don't want to carry the cannister stove.

Cannister stove is better if you really plan to "cook", alcohol stove is good for hot water for instant meals, tea, coffee, etc.
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Old 02-08-2013, 04:10 AM   #95
Emoto
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Location: SE Mass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyTh View Post
Thats 3 great soves you have there. All 3 is used by the Norwegian army. Take care of them and they will burn forever.
But be aware that last model have a filter inside the tube comming from the tank. This got cloged on mine, even i used camp stove fuel. Pulled the filter out and no problems after that.
How much fid you pay? I have a few for sale.
Ooh, thanks for the tip about the filter.

It has been a few years, but I think I paid around $159 US for the Hiker.
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Old 02-08-2013, 05:19 AM   #96
AlanCT
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Location: Northeastern CT
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I have three stoves, which I like and use for different things.

Coleman 535 Dual fuel

Pros:

Durable, controllable flame, can run on bike gas, parts available in any town if needed. A red plastic Folgers coffee can makes a perfect carrying case

Cons:

Heavy and a bit bulky, but not a big deal on a bike.


Coleman Exponent propane canister stove

Pros:

Tiny, quick and simple to use. Great for fair weather backpacking or riding two-up when space is at a premium.

Cons:

Works poorly in cold weather, canisters are expensive and not as easy to find.

Homade "Supercat" alcohol stove

Pros:

Cheap, easy and fun to make out of a small cat food or similar can and something to make holes with. Light and tiny. Cheap, easily available fuel. Perfect as a backup or to make quick hot food or drinks.

Cons:

Short burn time; just enough to boil a small container of water. Highly susceptible to wind. Easy to spill, so needs extra care taken.
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Old 02-08-2013, 10:00 AM   #97
Chip Seal
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Location: Western Orygun
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stove

[QUOTE=AlanCT;20676678]I have three stoves, which I like and use for different things.

Coleman 535 Dual fuel

Pros:

Durable, controllable flame, can run on bike gas, parts available in any town if needed. A red plastic Folgers coffee can makes a perfect carrying case

Cons:

Heavy and a bit bulky, but not a big deal on a bike.

I returned to using this dual fuel Coleman. Works in cold and hot weather. Not really that large on a bike. Look on Craigs list, usually 20 bucks and they throw in a gallon or two of Coleman fuel.


Coleman Exponent propane canister stove

Pros:

Tiny, quick and simple to use. Great for fair weather backpacking or riding two-up when space is at a premium.

Cons:

Works poorly in cold weather, canisters are expensive and not as easy to find.


Correct about not working in Cold. Reason I returned to 535 dual fuel stove. Big negative is Coleman stopped producing and selling the canisters. You buy an adapter for 25/30 bucks, but supply on adapter has dwindled. I also had the exponent lantern. Used same fuel. It was a fantastic light. But worthless as I have not found an alternate fuel.
Jet boil looks good but mainly for boiling water.
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Old 02-08-2013, 10:33 AM   #98
bikerfish
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Joined: Aug 2010
Location: western pa
Oddometer: 1,427
I like and use both my coleman dual fuel and my msr whisperlight, all depends on my mood and how/what I want to cook. BUT I'm really wanting one of those optimus hikers!
question, how do they simmer?
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