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Old 02-04-2015, 03:30 PM   #1
DudeClone OP
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OEM Tool Kit?

Are they useful or laughable in this day and age?

I was thinking about it because some make so much of them and I cannot locate mine atm. It's somewhere, but who knows! And I've even read some posts saying about buying used bikes, "if it doesn't have the tool kit, don't buy the bike!" But even since I got my first scooter some years ago I always saw them as something of a joke. However I've read posts on forums for MY bike where guys with lot's of experience say they are useful, and some with pro tools even use the OEM kit sometimes for spark plugs, and what not. But seriously? I was thinking of replacing mine if I can't find it but have some tools of my own, and here is what came in my bike kit. Ebay, $40. $40!



I mean, are they made from sterling silver? Those look fairly ordinary to me, and not any sort of unique tools for the bike, specifically.

So, what kind of bike do you ride and what came in YOUR tool kit? And perhaps more interesting, do you ever use it for your bike?
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Old 02-04-2015, 07:21 PM   #2
wcohl
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I've had mixed results with OEM tool kits. Some of the wrenches seemed they were made of butter, and others had the only tool that would remove the spark plug.

For my dirt bikes, I have a fanny pack with a mix of OEM and other "good" tools. How do I decide what to keep? Easy. I use the tool kit in my garage to do a basic service. This includes wheel removal, oil and air filter service, and some other routine tasks. If the tool doesn't meet my needs, I replace. I did a similar test with my street bike tool kits and replaced the crappy tools.

From the looks of your picture, I'd say Yamaha. If so, they work OK for axle nut/wheel removal. I can't say the same for other brands, including KTM.
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Old 02-04-2015, 07:26 PM   #3
JimVonBaden
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The kit that came with my bike:



Needless to say, I carry a bit more: http://www.jimvonbaden.com/Tool_Kit.html
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Old 02-04-2015, 07:30 PM   #4
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I always thought they would be good for emergency use, but not much else. I've been lucky and to date, on-road problems have been limited. Hey, at least your bike came with an OEM tool kit. My '12 Road King did not come with any tools... !@#$% I bought this and keep it stowed in the left saddlebag right next to my air compressor and tire plug kit. Another idea is to take inventory of the tools required for a major preventative maintenance service on the bike and then make your own tool roll with said tool inventory. Edit: wcohl beat me to the punch...
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Old 02-04-2015, 07:50 PM   #5
Sparrowhawk
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I chose the hybrid route. Some tools from the OEM kit with select additions. I went all over the bike and figured out all the tasks that might come up. With these few tools I can (and do) perform all routine maintenance and take care of most things likely to need repairs. Every single piece has a purpose. For longer trips I add things like electric tester, various spares, etc. but this all fits in the tool space.



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Old 02-04-2015, 08:32 PM   #6
alekkas
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A tool kit matters to me. Just got my 919 a few months ago with no tool kit. After looking used, spent something like $50 - 60 for an oem new from the dealer. Looks fairly complete like the OP pic.

I look at it this way, sport riding with the guys, I have something small that fits under the seat that fits many easily accessible side of the road jobs. I could not fit that many sized tools tools so compactly otherwise. Also included is a tire repair kit for limping home.

Of course, take more when going cross country each summer...


edit to add - with my old connie and the 919, NOTHING works better for ease of spark plug removal that those crappy tools! Also, have to replace the plastic handle screwdriver with a multibit because those do get brittle and crack
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Old 02-05-2015, 05:36 AM   #7
swimmer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DudeClone View Post
Are they useful or laughable in this day and age?

I was thinking about it because some make so much of them and I cannot locate mine atm. It's somewhere, but who knows! And I've even read some post saying about buying used "if it doesn't have the tool kit, don't but the bike!" But even since i got my first scooter some years ago I always saw them as something of a joke. However I've read posts on forums for MY bike where guys with lot's of experience say they are useful, and some with pro tools even use the OEM sometimes for spark plugs, and what not. But seriously? I was thinking of replacing mine if I can't find it but have some tools and here is what came in mine. Ebay, $40. $40!



I mean, are they made from sterling silver? Those look fairly ordinary to me, and not any sort of unique tools for the bike, specifically.

So, what kind of bike do you ride and what came in YOUR tool kit? And perhaps more interesting, do you ever use it for your bike?
Looks like a Kawi kit, no?
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Old 02-05-2015, 05:44 AM   #8
maydaymike
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That looks like a proper toolkit to me! New Bonnevilles come with a single allen wrench (5mm) that can be used to remove the seat. The Harley didn't come with anything at all.
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Old 02-05-2015, 06:04 AM   #9
Carl Childers
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It depends on the bike, if the original tolol kit came with just standard wrenches, screwdrivers etc. then I just as soon upgrade it with better tools. In the case of my Gen.1 Bandit the tool kit has a hinged spark plug socket to get the plugs out of the deep plug wells quick and easy, I wouldn't be finding a socket like that at my local Sears store so I'm really glad to have the OEM tool kit for that bike!
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Old 02-05-2015, 10:25 AM   #10
freetors
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I've added a few things to mine. My dad's KLR when he goes on trips, however, is like a rolling toolbox. He must carry 20 lbs of tools.
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Old 02-05-2015, 02:33 PM   #11
Süsser Tod
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My CBR had NO toolkit, Honda made it an option on 07+ bikes. I don't really care for toolkits, there is not much that you can fix on a modern bike in the middle of nowhere, if it breaks, you're going to wait for parts. My toolkit is good just to adjust the chain, replace a cable, tighten off common sized bolts and to replace the stator and RR
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Old 02-05-2015, 02:59 PM   #12
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Mine came with a spanner for the hub to adjust the chain, a screwdriver with swappable flathead/phillips bit, allen to remove bodywork, fuse puller... I don't think much else.

By far, the number one thing that will "break" on a trip is a tire, so I add a repair kit and compressor. Next most likely thing is going down, so I bring some duct tape in case shit is trying to fall off the bike after an incident. On my Triumph, this is all I bring along.

I did a coast-to-coast on an old Buell a few years - I packed a LOT more for that one... torx keys, allen keys, pliers, wrenches, vice grips...

I had an old '64 Harley XLCH that I adored but didn't trust for nothing - if I was going more than 25 miles from home it, I literally had a backpack full of stuff. Never needed it!
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Old 02-05-2015, 03:08 PM   #13
DudeClone OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swimmer View Post
Looks like a Kawi kit, no?
it is a Yamaha kit for a FZ6. pretty sure other Yamaha kits are similar. i have started to carry my own tools after 10 months of ownership but took the OEM kit out of the bike when i bought it because i needed space under the seat, which is limited. i've always carried a wrench and socket in case my oil drain bolt got loose, but thats it. which is sort of unnecessary because hand tightening should do, and how unlikely would that be, anyway? but i change the oil so you never know! might want to snug it up should it ever leak

that changed a few weeks ago when my battery died and i did not have the allen wrenches to lift the tank. which is essential to do to get at much on my bike, including the battery. so i put those under the seat, as well. the boneheads my "service" sent out to help me (lol) did not even have so much as that. pliers and screw drivers wtf?

so i am putting something more comprehensive together and the little OEM kit would seem useful for some things, i suppose. but i have replacements and have yet to come across the kit itself. however i will, and check out sizes and what not and go along with that as a guide. but replacing the kit at $40 for tools i already have? nah

it is said the OEM spark plug wrench is useful for getting at the plugs without having to lift the tank and removing things under there, but it's a fiddly operation anyway. but i'd like that should i ever decide to tackle that job myself
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Old 02-05-2015, 04:59 PM   #14
wcohl
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Quote:
it is said the OEM spark plug wrench is useful for getting at the plugs without having to lift the tank and removing things under there, but it's a fiddly operation anyway. but i'd like that should i ever decide to tackle that job myself
I've found OEM spark plug wrenches to be very useful. They're sized just right to get in the hard to reach spots. This is one of the few tool kit wrenches I use when I'm in my garage surrounded by many higher quality tools.
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:22 PM   #15
bisbonian
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Originally Posted by wcohl View Post
I've found OEM spark plug wrenches to be very useful. They're sized just right to get in the hard to reach spots. This is one of the few tool kit wrenches I use when I'm in my garage surrounded by many higher quality tools.
I second this. The thin-wall design of those cheap looking OEM kits is sometimes perfect and normal sockets don't work.
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