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Old 10-08-2012, 11:01 PM   #16
scooterspirit
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Exclusive to HFL, here’s a run down of the CBR500’s specs:
- 470cc liquid-cooled, parallel-twin
- Six-speed manual
- 46.9bhp
- 30lb/ft of torque
- 401lbs (dry)/430lbs (wet)
- 105mph top speed
- 31-inch seat height
- 120/70-17 (front)/160-60-17 (rear)
Those figures come from a trusted contact inside Honda Europe. While we can’t reveal their identity or the reasons why we’re so sure they’re correct, we stand behind their veracity.
That power figure may seem oddly precise, but it’s spot on for Europe’s new A2 license tier, which will allow 19-year olds to ride bikes with up to 35kw of power. Or 46.9 of your good old-fashioned horses.
It’s also close to double the power of the CBR250 without doubling the weight. Where that bike makes .073bhp per wet pound, the CBR500 makes .109. That puts it into the middle of a performance gap in the market. Kawasaki’s Ninja 650 weighs 460lbs (wet) and makes 71bhp, giving it a power-to-weight ratio of .154, while the new Ninja 300 makes 39bhp and weighs 379lbs, giving it .103 horses to pounds.
With that 470cc twin, the CBR500 also makes decent torque. Where the Ninja 300 sits at 20lb/ft, the CBR250 makes 17lb/ft and the Ninja 650 47, the CBR500 is again in a class of its own at 30lb/ft.
So why not just buy that Ninja 650 or other, similar, bikes? Hopefully that’s going to be about money. Where the Honda CBR250 is just $4,200, the Ninja 650 is $7,599. If the CBR500 can split the difference, Honda could be onto a winner. The spy photos of the bike were snapped at the same factory in Thailand in which Honda produces the CBR250, suggesting an affordable price. A modular approach, which sees the CBR an CB500 sharing pretty much every component but fairing and handlebars, also points towards affordability.
Of course, targeting European learners, Southeast Asian and South American riders and broke Americans means that Honda is chasing one other metric for the CBR500: fuel-economy. The single-cylinder CBR250 returns 77mpg, but the new, parallel-twin NC700x manages 64mpg thanks to a variety of new technologies drawn from Honda’s auto division. Our source wasn’t able to provide a fuel economy figure, but did say the new motor should draw on that technology too. The Ninja 650 returns 50mpg and the outgoing Ninja 250 61mpg.
But the big news? In Honda’s internal system, the codes “AC” and “CM” are listed next to the model’s name. “AC” = America (California/50 State) and CM means “Canada.” Expect the CBR500 to arrive in both early next year.

http://hellforleathermagazine.com/20...-honda-cbr500/
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Old 10-09-2012, 07:08 AM   #17
TonyKZ1
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I hope it makes it here and does very well. It looks interesting and would make an excellent replacement for the Ninja 500 and GS500's of years gone by. It or the NC700x may very well be my next bike.
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Old 10-09-2012, 07:26 AM   #18
mrbreeze
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Gosh, I hope they make it look like a Harley Davidson.

And a drum rear brake would be the cat's meow.


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Old 10-09-2012, 07:28 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scooterspirit View Post
Exclusive to HFL, here’s a run down of the CBR500’s specs:
- 470cc liquid-cooled, parallel-twin
- Six-speed manual
- 46.9bhp
- 30lb/ft of torque
- 401lbs (dry)/430lbs (wet)
- 105mph top speed
- 31-inch seat height
- 120/70-17 (front)/160-60-17 (rear)
Those figures come from a trusted contact inside Honda Europe. While we can’t reveal their identity or the reasons why we’re so sure they’re correct, we stand behind their veracity.
That power figure may seem oddly precise, but it’s spot on for Europe’s new A2 license tier, which will allow 19-year olds to ride bikes with up to 35kw of power. Or 46.9 of your good old-fashioned horses.
It’s also close to double the power of the CBR250 without doubling the weight. Where that bike makes .073bhp per wet pound, the CBR500 makes .109. That puts it into the middle of a performance gap in the market. Kawasaki’s Ninja 650 weighs 460lbs (wet) and makes 71bhp, giving it a power-to-weight ratio of .154, while the new Ninja 300 makes 39bhp and weighs 379lbs, giving it .103 horses to pounds.
With that 470cc twin, the CBR500 also makes decent torque. Where the Ninja 300 sits at 20lb/ft, the CBR250 makes 17lb/ft and the Ninja 650 47, the CBR500 is again in a class of its own at 30lb/ft.
So why not just buy that Ninja 650 or other, similar, bikes? Hopefully that’s going to be about money. Where the Honda CBR250 is just $4,200, the Ninja 650 is $7,599. If the CBR500 can split the difference, Honda could be onto a winner. The spy photos of the bike were snapped at the same factory in Thailand in which Honda produces the CBR250, suggesting an affordable price. A modular approach, which sees the CBR an CB500 sharing pretty much every component but fairing and handlebars, also points towards affordability.
Of course, targeting European learners, Southeast Asian and South American riders and broke Americans means that Honda is chasing one other metric for the CBR500: fuel-economy. The single-cylinder CBR250 returns 77mpg, but the new, parallel-twin NC700x manages 64mpg thanks to a variety of new technologies drawn from Honda’s auto division. Our source wasn’t able to provide a fuel economy figure, but did say the new motor should draw on that technology too. The Ninja 650 returns 50mpg and the outgoing Ninja 250 61mpg.
But the big news? In Honda’s internal system, the codes “AC” and “CM” are listed next to the model’s name. “AC” = America (California/50 State) and CM means “Canada.” Expect the CBR500 to arrive in both early next year.

http://hellforleathermagazine.com/20...-honda-cbr500/
That's a great article and it can't be coincidence that 2 American websites would start giving more tidbits about the bike. So I'm going to say it's coming. Now what color choices are we going to get... The white in the pictures looks nice...
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:59 AM   #20
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Hmmm...interesting. If they can keep the overall form factor within the CBR250 parameters (excepting weight, of course), it could be interesting.

Although I must say...I start thinking about wanting a bigger bike during boring moments at work or in the evenings. I read reviews of larger Ninjas and VFRs and FJRs...

Then I go ride my CBR250R and forget all that. The bike is so light and nimble and kick-ass fun to ride, I can hardly stand it. Sure, a few more HP would be nice but I don't know if I want the extra weight/length/girth.

I will definitely go check out the 500 though. The Ninja 300 wouldn't be worth the cost of upgrade, but the 500 might be.
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Old 10-09-2012, 10:40 AM   #21
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I've just sold my CBR250R because I purchased a CRF250L. I loved the little 250 and I really can see myself with the new 500.

That being said, Hell for Leather Magazine has published some specs 'from a well placed source within Honda'. I'm going from memory here, but the bike weighs 430lbs wet and has precisely 49.7 HP and approx 20ft/lbs of torque to comply with Euro graduated licensing standards.

While thats significantly better than the 250's power output, the extra 75lbs causes some concern. If it retains the 250's 'character' and fuel economy, it'll be a winner, as the 250 is a seriously fun bike to ride. But I wouldn't expect Duke level performance out of it if that's what ppl are hoping for.

Hell the SV650 is only 15lbs more and makes something like 65hp.

Time'll tell.
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Old 10-09-2012, 10:47 AM   #22
Grainbelt
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The specs are within spitting distance of the old air-cooled '93 Suzuki GS500 that I had as a first bike. Have we come no further in 20 years?
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Old 10-09-2012, 11:43 AM   #23
Gryphon12
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There is a minimum weight and price to produce any motorcycle. The new Honda will be within spitting distance of all the 650 twins, old and new, in price and weight - it's economics and physics. It is why, until the really bad economy, there has been no middle-weight class in the US. It made more sense (and cents) to spend just a little more and buy a 600cc supersport with a lot more performance - and less weight. Now, with much better fuel economy and the resulting modest power output, and almost similar weight, maybe a middle class will sell in North America. (The real arguement for this motorcycle, however, is in Europe [tiered licensing] with expansion markets into Asia and South America, and perhaps Australia.)

My baseline for comparison is the SV650S. The measured specs (Sportrider) for the 2004 Suzuki SV650S (2nd gen, FI) show 372 lbs. dry, 428 lbs. wet, 70.9 hp (crank) and 45.1 ft-lbs. (crank), with an 4.5 gallon tank and fuel economy of 50/37/44 mpg US (hi/lo/avg).

The new Honda will have to demonstrate the trade-off between hp and fuel economy (e.g. fuel economy needs to be 60+ mpg US, like a BMW) or it is dead on arrival.

At an intermediate price point, the suspension will be budget - the current downfall of ALL middle-weights. The EX-250, EX-300, EX-650, SV-650, GSX-650F, FZ6-R all need a much better suspensions (and better brakes). But that would miss the price point. That's why a Triumph Street Triple R is $10k (and gets barely 40 mpg US).

The old YZF-600R (Thundercat in Europe) really was a great compromise for its day. Priced under the YZF-6R, it weighed 412 lbs. dry, 485 lbs. wet with a 5.0 gallon tank, fully adjustable suspension, 31.7 " seat height, 90 hp, 45 ft-lbs, and 45 mpg average with a great sport-touring riding position, full saddle and great fairing. A little more expensive, yes. Some who rode it hard had transmission problems - a definite issue. But the package was great. It died because it was too close in price to the YZF-6R and it weighed too much compared to the 600cc Supersport class of its day. You just can't have it all in one package.

If the YZF-600R was made today, with FI instead of carbs, I'd buy it at 90% of the price of the current YZF-6R. But that's just me. What I'll end up doing is either buying a new twin (maybe the Honda) and replacing the entire front end and rear shock, or putting a fairing on a Triumph Street Triple R and living with the poor fuel economy / range.
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:43 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grainbelt View Post
The specs are within spitting distance of the old air-cooled '93 Suzuki GS500 that I had as a first bike. Have we come no further in 20 years?
Not with Euro legislation.

Btw, in another thread I was talking about restricted bikes, and I think Cortez mentioned that any bike can be restricted (true), but I'm also reading that the 2013-on Euro regs stipulate that the bike mustn't be restricted from a bike with more than double the bhp/power-to-weight.

In other words, this completely explains why Triumph's 800 Tiger (94 bhp, full power) doesn't fall foul of the rules, whereas restricting a Yamaha R6 would.

In fact, in Europe, riding an R6 under the age of 24 will essentially be verboten unless the rider passes an extra test.
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Old 10-09-2012, 02:51 PM   #25
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I really like the idea of the CB500...not so much the CBR250/500. I see bodywork as a pain..and only tolerated on basically a race bike.
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Old 10-09-2012, 03:19 PM   #26
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Saltspray, we are all informed by our environment and our surroundings.

Try living north of the Mason-Dixon line, or above 3,000 ft msl. Bodywork isn't just for aerodynamics at the track. Protection from wind and weather are often essential for those of us in wetter, colder climates.

I've ridden naked bikes for most of my 40+ year riding career. I love riding behind a moderately-sized fairing in the Pacific Northwest.
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Old 10-09-2012, 08:05 PM   #27
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The CB definitely has my attention, if it is a "finished" bike; of the last three Hondas to catch my eye, only the CRF250 looks like the designers didn't nod off in the middle of the job... The CBR250 and the NC700 have great points, until the suspension or brakes. If the CB is as quality built as the 599, 919, or even the Nighthawk 750, I will probably gave to forego my usual method of buying used and scoop one of these up fresh off the boat...
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Old 10-09-2012, 08:10 PM   #28
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Why can't they give the bike some suspension from this century?
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:24 PM   #29
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I'm really glad that Honda is giving us mid-sized bikes again. I'm not digging the weight, though. But that's OK. I hope these two are such huge sales successes that other manufacturers give us more choices in this category.
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Old 10-10-2012, 05:54 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Gryphon12 View Post
Saltspray, we are all informed by our environment and our surroundings.

Try living north of the Mason-Dixon line, or above 3,000 ft msl. Bodywork isn't just for aerodynamics at the track. Protection from wind and weather are often essential for those of us in wetter, colder climates.

I've ridden naked bikes for most of my 40+ year riding career. I love riding behind a moderately-sized fairing in the Pacific Northwest.
I see your point although I think you're talking more about a front fairing windscreen where I was talking about cosmetic side panels. I should have clarified. I've always wanted to get out to WA/OR...I hear it's gorgeous out there.
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