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Old 10-07-2012, 12:05 PM   #1
CodeMonkee OP
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Garage/shop floor paint/treatment?

I don't have too much stuff in my shop yet, so maybe now is a good time to paint the untreated floor with something to make it "shiny" (see how I worked that in there?).

I want something that is non-slip, looks good, cleans up well and is durable. Also, it should be relatively easy to apply (prefer roller) and not cost and arm and a leg as I have to cover 2000 square feet.

Suggestions?
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Old 10-07-2012, 12:46 PM   #2
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I don't know how much an arm and a leg is. I did the two-part epoxy paint in my garage ten years ago. Would I do it again? Yes. Is it indestructible? No.

Moisture is the biggest problem. Anywhere moisture can get into the concrete, the lime leeches up under the paint and causes it to bubble and flake. As a result, I have damage to the edge facing the doors and in one area where the ground gets very wet during the winter (and the slightest moisture soaks under and through the concrete).

Also: water turns the stuff to pure ice. You will slip and break your neck if you don't put sand into the paint before application. I wanted the shiny look but, it's just not appropriate if wet shoes, tires, etc, are part of the equation.

Other than that, the largest areas have worn well and the epoxy paint is much tougher than most single-part concrete paints I've seen.
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Old 10-07-2012, 12:47 PM   #3
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Go here: http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/f...splay.php?f=20

Tons of ideas!

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Old 10-07-2012, 01:38 PM   #4
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Two part 100% solids epoxy. Prep is the most important part. If you can afford it, have a commercial business shot blast the floor.

I have a shop with about 4500 square feet on the first floor. I epoxied the concrete about 2 1/2 years ago. This is an auto repair business open at least 50 hours a week. Brake rotors get dropped on the floor from shoulder height, floor jacks with full sized cars are dragged across it. All sorts of fluids are spilled. There are areas that have chipped but I blame that on poor prep.
Here's what it looked like after cure but before I put in the lifts.
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Old 10-07-2012, 10:22 PM   #5
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Thanks guys.

I definitely want non-slip.

An arm and a leg is 50 cents to a dollar per square foot.

Still not sure what I am going to do. If the floor is sealed already (I think it might be - there are signs it was once painted) then I might have to acid etch it and that would increase the time, effort and cost.

I might just wait and do it next year instead.
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Old 10-08-2012, 02:38 PM   #6
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test for moisture -- tape some plastic (a garbage bag does nicely) to the floor all along the perimiater of the plastic -- duct tape or plastic tape of spome form is good for this (masking tape is not).

Do this in a couple of places over the floor (you gots lots of floor!)

After at least a couple three days (includ a rainy period, if you can), remove the plastic and inspect for moisture.

If you find any, spend the money in another manner.

You KNOW how I know.
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:22 PM   #7
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Make sure you get the surface prepped properly.

One shop I worked in the owner hired a contractor to coat the floors only to have nearly 100% of the coating come up 2 years later! Other places have had epoxy floor coating that hold up well to years of commercial abuse. I've seen the good stuff peel and flake off after not much time in places where the surface wasn't prepped well.

As for the anti-skid that's usually just walnuts or sand added into the paint. Not a huge deal. The walnut shells provide the best anti skid surface that I've seen but I wouldn't want to work in a shop where the whole floor was coated with them OUCH!
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Old 10-09-2012, 05:56 AM   #8
Tmaximusv
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I used epoxy kit on an older garage floor. The center stand of my airhead tore it up quickly. The rest of the floor did OK for the 1.5 yrs we were there.
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:03 AM   #9
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Concrete stain, get any color you want, dont have to worry about it chipping and all that associated with epoxy.
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:28 AM   #10
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I tried Epoxy-Coat on a new slab after I finished building a 400sq ft garage/shop.

It looked pretty but didn't live up to claims of durability...it chipped easily. Maybe something to do with the prep, but my new slab was clean and had no chemical stains. I did the scrub/clean process with Muriatic acid, per instructions.

If I get the funds to do it in my existing garage, I think I'd surface-grind the floor so the adhesion is better, and maybe have professionals come in and put the coating down.
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:46 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shuffler View Post
I tried Epoxy-Coat on a new slab after I finished building a 400sq ft garage/shop.

It looked pretty but didn't live up to claims of durability...it chipped easily. Maybe something to do with the prep, but my new slab was clean and had no chemical stains. I did the scrub/clean process with Muriatic acid, per instructions.

If I get the funds to do it in my existing garage, I think I'd surface-grind the floor so the adhesion is better, and maybe have professionals come in and put the coating down.
For that size I would go with Porcelain. It is cheap and durable.

Check out some results from the link I posted above.

Jim
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Old 10-09-2012, 11:04 PM   #12
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I bought some really expensive stuff from Griot's Garage when I first did the floor in our old house. It didn't hold up all that well. Before we sold the place, I recoated it with the Rustoleum stuff from Home Depot. No idea how it held up, because we moved.

Our current place was already coated. I think it was professionally done with a tan epoxy with the color chips. I say that because it's at least ten years old, and it's held up really well. It is starting to come up in a couple places (we live in a heavy salt area in MN). I'd like to repair the coating in those spots without re-doing the whole floor, but not sure how to do that.
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Old 10-10-2012, 08:51 PM   #13
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Here is the floor I just did in my freshly restored garage (was just a shell built sometime in the 40's). It's commvercial VCT with a commercial poly/wax coating. I have about $.80/sq/ft including tile, glue, and coating. It's repairable, very durable, reasonably slip resistant and the color combos/patterns are nearly unlimited. It has it's drawbacks, but I'm familliar with how it wears compared to epoxy and I went this way for a reason.

On a side note, a floor like this in a garage is one bennefit of being recently divorced.
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Old 10-10-2012, 09:32 PM   #14
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motornoggin View Post


Here is the floor I just did in my freshly restored garage (was just a shell built sometime in the 40's). It's commvercial VCT with a commercial poly/wax coating. I have about $.80/sq/ft including tile, glue, and coating. It's repairable, very durable, reasonably slip resistant and the color combos/patterns are nearly unlimited. It has it's drawbacks, but I'm familliar with how it wears compared to epoxy and I went this way for a reason.

On a side note, a floor like this in a garage is one bennefit of being recently divorced.
Nice!

I need to seal mine, but even unsealed, it beats the hell out of bare concrete.




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Old 10-10-2012, 09:49 PM   #15
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Looks really good Jim!

I dunno, something about this kind of floor looks really good in a garage.
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