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Old 09-27-2012, 01:23 PM   #31
DirtyADV
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If it right for you or not is entirely up to you!

Can share my experience!

Had a blast as a kid on a small PW50.

After that a Puch Florida and a Gilera Bullit in my teens.

Took the motorcycle license at 18 but no bike for quite some years after that.

Ended up getting a dirt bike Suzuki RM125 but that was at my dads place and going there to ride was a hassle so my dad mainly used it. So bought a Honda CRF450 Motard that also had a set of dirt wheels but longest trip I did was like 30km it was a pain.

Searched the internet and had my mind set on a 950 Adventure that I bought and have never looked back, sure I dont use its full potential but really love it!

It handles everything, sure its heavy and gets scratched up.

I ride quite a lot alone and then you have to pace yourself and hold back cause if anything goes bad at modest speeds on a heavy bike you can be in BIG trouble very quickly, rather have a slow speed tipover then a higher speed crash even if the obstacle would have been easier to pass with a little speed.

So if you like the bike and have the funds for it GO FOR IT, if you dont like it you will probably loose money selling.

How was it? "He who has played with the most toys when he dies wins!"

/Johan
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:32 PM   #32
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I didnt read all the post's, but the general idea seems to be that it's too much too soon, sort of thing. I've had mine now for six years, 50 some years riding different bikes from motorcross to street bikes and my advice would be to buy it, if its a good deal. The 990 adv, while packing a vicious punch, is also a really easy bike to ride, well balanced, wide bars to hang on to, good suspension, if adjusted right. It's a bit high so in certain situations it can be a handfull. It still makes me grin, every time i ride it. Go for it!
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:47 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mountain eagle View Post
In rougher terrain, larger or heavier bikes need more momentum to maintain the elusivly light feel they can have. The slower you are moving the more apparent the heavyness of steering can be. And once they get to the tipping point it's damn hard to recover.

And while they don't like stop and go traffic and run hot as a rule, they can be mellow if you want. Now when you get use to wheelies, power steering, and going where ever you like, you'll do that if you care to. I don't think you have to ride these as many are describing, but if you are inclined towards hooligan behaviour the ktm big twins will help you get there faster.
That is it exactly. For me though, once it hits that tipping point I'll just let it go (and get out of its way!). Easier to stand it back up again than to strain my back trying to save it.

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Old 09-27-2012, 02:28 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by ykrweb View Post
I think if you have to ask this question then its not the bike for you. Could you ride it? Absolutely. Would you be able to use it for what its intended for? Probably not. It's a giant dirt bike with an angry engine. It's designed to go 100MPH in the desert not 10MPH in the city. Don't get me wrong. I think its a beautiful thing and I ride it 5 days a week but if your not an aggressive rider its a waste of money. I've always loved big powerful dirt bikes (Cr500, yz400f, MXC525) and the 990 was a natural progression. I had to have it. My 18 year old can ride it well but he grew up shredding single track in Ca and Or. If your the kind of rider that can't easily do a wheelie, power slide or get some air in the dirt then pick something more mellow.
I respectfully disagree. If you follow this line of logic then any car that can do over 80 would be a waste of time. Or driving a lifted truck around on blacktop and not out scraping sheet metal would be a waste too. These things are subjective. Some people like to own things for aesthetics, the way it sounds or with the thought that someday they might get to use it to it's full potential. If the bike was not capable of being ridden on the street and or light off-roading that would be one thing, but it is very capable at this and more if one chooses to. Some of us would never wheelie our bike no matter how much time we had in the saddle. My dad has had bikes for years and he never did. He was content to just enjoy being out on two wheels. Not that there is anything wrong with doing 100 in the dessert or pulling wheelies. But even the best wipe out doing this from time to time, something I hope to avoid.
When I bought my first airplane I had my heart set on a 43' Stearman. This plane is capable of most aerobatics and is a total blast to get upside down. But at the time I bought it I was not capable of flying it to it's full potential. But I got it. I loved it, still do. In time I took lessons and my abilities grew to match what the plane can do. The point is just because something can do it does not mean you have to. We all buy things for different reasons and rationalize why or why not we should drop the coin. In my experience when ever I got anything less than what I wanted I was never happy. So this all comes down to you. What do you intend to use it for? Are you willing to take time and work you way up to ridding it single track which could be a while? Certainly not out of the question to aspire to this. If you want to hit the throttle tomorrow and be blasting down a hardcore trail I think any bike would be laying on it's side with broken parts hanging off and you may get broken in the process. I knew the bike is way more capable than I am but I knew I can learn. And I have and will continue to. Am I blasting down single track yet? No, but I am OK with that, soon enough. Next year I will be taking a couple courses and hope to improve my technique. Until then I am happy to be ridding my KTM on pavement and hitting the fire roads as much as I can.

Bottom line, Get what you want. Not what others tell you to want.
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Old 09-27-2012, 02:51 PM   #35
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"Just because the throttle will turn that far doesn't mean you have to run it that far." - The Old Man.

If it's a truly smoking deal, just give it a shot.
If you change your mind later, you can sell it for what you paid for it.
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Old 09-27-2012, 02:55 PM   #36
crofrog
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at the end of the day if you don't want to ride it fast on and off-road, stop diluting the brand and go get on a yamaha or a BMW and slap on your high-viz and ride around with empty cases to starbucks.
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Old 09-27-2012, 03:06 PM   #37
folknride
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My 2 cents

I hadn't ridden in (many) years. In my early sixties I wanted to start again, and knew I wanted to go interesting places and not just stick to pavement, but knew I wanted to travel the highways in reasonable comfort as well. I bought an 05 950, frankly, not really knowing much about what I was getting into. Several years later I moved to a 2010 990. These bikes have served my purpose very well.
The 990 handles pavement, gravel, back roads, fire roads very well. For me - a far from expert and aggressive rider - it is bloody big and heavy when the tire tracks end.
My opinion about speed - in loose stuff of any sort it handles better with some speed. The two off road dumps I've had (they hurt!) were probably caused by slowing down at the wrong moment. It doesn't chug along well in first or second at low rpm like a GS will, so some clutch work is necessary for me if things get hairy.
Have a look at what Riceless950 did on his (lots of great videos). I you want to ride that stuff - buy something smaller - that level of skill and nerve with the big bike is hard to come by.
In my opinion the Adventures are great all round motorcycles that have the potential to be crazy fast if you want to. So long as you are able to physically handle a bike that tall, go for it and let you right hand be your guide.
I won't blather on about maintenance and comfort because it's all well documented here on the site. I will say that if you don't want to or can't work on the bike yourself, it might be an expensive proposition to own one.
PS - I just bought a 690 Enduro to expand my range a bit.
And PPS - don't listen to this crap about "if you don't ride crazy fast, you can't have one" This is not a freakin' cult. Buy what works for you and ride where you want!
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Old 09-27-2012, 03:10 PM   #38
Tangai
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Yeah it could be your first bike and you’d do okay, but…okay is really not all that much fun or safe. There’s just too much about riding off road that can only be learned on a smaller dirt bike.

A year on a small dirt bike (a good used CRF250R for example) and a rider can learn more riding techniques than a rider who rides on the road only could in 10 years and, in fact, things a road only rider will never learn. Learning to cross wet logs, streams, ride through deep ruts, in mud, rocks, muddy wet rocks, sand, snow, wet grass, jumps, double jumps, wheelies, front wheel wheelies (stoppies), broad slides, climbing-descends, with a flat or with two flats, the difference between momentum and clutch-throttle control, balance, counter steering, steering with the rear wheel, with the brakes or with the throttle or both at the same time and many more skills come from riding a dirt bike, and most will transfer to adventure riding.

You could go ahead and get a big adventure bike and a real dirt bike (if money permits) and practice on the dirt bike and develop skills while enjoying the adventure bike. Just remember they are different animals and many skills transfer, but some don’t. There are classes for off road riding and motocross. And there classes on riding big adventure bikes, because there are many skills especially needed for them—such as balance and clutch-throttle control. These classes can be bought on DVD and are well worth the money.

Having said all that, other than a dual sport bike, an adventure bike is the safest type of motorcycle you can get. That’s my humble, but expert opinion.
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Old 09-27-2012, 03:10 PM   #39
ykrweb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by propilot10 View Post
I respectfully disagree. If you follow this line of logic then any car that can do over 80 would be a waste of time. Or driving a lifted truck around on blacktop and not out scraping sheet metal would be a waste too. These things are subjective. Some people like to own things for aesthetics, the way it sounds or with the thought that someday they might get to use it to it's full potential. If the bike was not capable of being ridden on the street and or light off-roading that would be one thing, but it is very capable at this and more if one chooses to. Some of us would never wheelie our bike no matter how much time we had in the saddle. My dad has had bikes for years and he never did. He was content to just enjoy being out on two wheels. Not that there is anything wrong with doing 100 in the dessert or pulling wheelies. But even the best wipe out doing this from time to time, something I hope to avoid.
When I bought my first airplane I had my heart set on a 43' Stearman. This plane is capable of most aerobatics and is a total blast to get upside down. But at the time I bought it I was not capable of flying it to it's full potential. But I got it. I loved it, still do. In time I took lessons and my abilities grew to match what the plane can do. The point is just because something can do it does not mean you have to. We all buy things for different reasons and rationalize why or why not we should drop the coin. In my experience when ever I got anything less than what I wanted I was never happy. So this all comes down to you. What do you intend to use it for? Are you willing to take time and work you way up to ridding it single track which could be a while? Certainly not out of the question to aspire to this. If you want to hit the throttle tomorrow and be blasting down a hardcore trail I think any bike would be laying on it's side with broken parts hanging off and you may get broken in the process. I knew the bike is way more capable than I am but I knew I can learn. And I have and will continue to. Am I blasting down single track yet? No, but I am OK with that, soon enough. Next year I will be taking a couple courses and hope to improve my technique. Until then I am happy to be ridding my KTM on pavement and hitting the fire roads as much as I can.

Bottom line, Get what you want. Not what others tell you to want.

I knew that my post would get this type of reaction here. Your newbie logic is also flawed. A good scooter can go 80MPH but the engine is very friendly to new riders. The 990 demands superior throttle control and new riders don't have it. If your taking courses to improve your offroad riding technique then I already know the 990 is too much bike for you especially if your afraid to crash. Someone who is afraid to push the limits on a dirt bike will never progress. If your flying as a hobby then you have a fair amount of disposible income which means your opinion may be very different from a guy who doesn't have your funds. I'm not one to buy pretty things that I can't actually use as they were intended. I don't want to be a poser or waste money. The OP can hit the same pavement and fire roads on a KLR, EXC or DR for $5K or he can just admit that he needs a city friendly street bike and buy that.
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Old 09-27-2012, 03:56 PM   #40
ilyaon OP
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Thank you for everyone's replies.

I'm not looking for the advice on if this bike for me or not. Even I do appreciate your input You don't know me, my abilities or what type of riding I plan to do. And I'm sure, you are not really interested to spend your time reading about it.

What I'm looking for is your story about your experiences and challenges when you first got 990.
Many of you have prior riding experiences and that's fine too. I would like to find out what was your opinion when you first got on 990 . If for some of you 990 was the first bike to ride, that's even better, share your stories too please.

Your input gives me information to understand what to expect from 990 and use this to make a choice regarding the purchase.
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Old 09-27-2012, 04:19 PM   #41
propilot10
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As you can see the opinions here differ greatly and doing what's right for you might not be right for another. (Whatever you do don't ask about oil) As another inmate pointed out I am a noob and maybe a poser all things I can live with. We all have to start someplace. I chose to buy what I wanted and grow into it rather than buy a multitude of bikes working my way up. 5500 miles since May and loving every minute.
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Old 09-27-2012, 04:41 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by ilyaon View Post
Thank you for everyone's replies.

I'm not looking for the advice on if this bike for me or not. Even I do appreciate your input You don't know me, my abilities or what type of riding I plan to do. And I'm sure, you are not really interested to spend your time reading about it.

What I'm looking for is your story about your experiences and challenges when you first got 990.
Many of you have prior riding experiences and that's fine too. I would like to find out what was your opinion when you first got on 990 . If for some of you 990 was the first bike to ride, that's even better, share your stories too please.

Your input gives me information to understand what to expect from 990 and use this to make a choice regarding the purchase.
I bought a used 2005.5 950 after 40k miles on KLRs and about 20k miles on various streetbikes.

I found that the 950 was well balanced, well suspended and a great street bike for me. Rode it on a ~2000 mile trip and loved it. Outstanding.

However, I found it was too tall, heavy, and powerful for me to ride off road so I sold it after about 18 months of ownership, which included quite a few panic stops and a couple of zero mph tipovers.

I don't have level of ability and commitment it takes to ride one of these bikes capably off road, at speed.

I do now have a Super Enduro, which is pretty tall and powerful, but feels a lot lighter and easier to control to me.
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Old 09-27-2012, 04:57 PM   #43
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been there done that

Here is a link to the exact same question I asked several years ago.
This is a large, heavy, powerful bike. I still dont kid myself thinking I have mastered the bike. I respect it. Part of me is still scared of crashing it, as you should be with any bike. The other part of me still smiles ear to ear about having the sack to buy my dream bike. I enjoy it. It is well mannered after a few mods and is a great street bike. Easy to ride and will everything you ask it to. The evil part is riding dirt roads parallel to a freeway and getting horrified looks by cagers when they realize you are passing them.
PM me with any questions.
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=252918
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Old 09-27-2012, 05:00 PM   #44
4corners14
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Well....thanks for that well thought out and helpful response.

Quote:
Originally Posted by crofrog View Post
at the end of the day if you don't want to ride it fast on and off-road, stop diluting the brand and go get on a yamaha or a BMW and slap on your high-viz and ride around with empty cases to starbucks.

It's nice to know who to go to for all the answers.
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Old 09-27-2012, 06:41 PM   #45
Iwantabikesobad
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2nd reply

So with all the wisdom here I will throw out something else. After that post we purchased a Suzuki DR-200. We also had intentions of my wife learning to ride on it. This has been a fantastic bike and great for learning on. We still ride it and have great fun. It is a blast to ride to work. My wife now rides a BMW 650 X Country. I have the KTM 990.
If you are a hunter you have probably heard that a 410 is either a beginner or an expert gun. I find this to be true with the 200. Passing and not being tailgated are something that must be taken seriously. The bike is really happy at 50 MPH if you can keep the engine in its happy place.Dont plan on passing someone doing 55 though. Moving up to the 400 cc. range would be the best place to start in my opinion. The bike will have lots of torque making it easier to ride slowly and learn skills on. It will have enough to easily stay with the flow of traffic and pull away from lights/stops with ease. It would be one that serves all needs and probably kept quite a while. Moving up in CC's from 650 up will get you: Much more expensive Bike, Maint,Tires,Fuel and Insurance. Depending on where and how you ride you may find the big KTM just to much bike to have fun on. These bikes must match your personality or you wont be happy with their quirkiness.
Find a 400CC bike and ride the wheels off it for a year, Come back and read this whole thread again and see how you feel.
By the way the Orange one's are faster.
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