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Old 09-27-2012, 06:54 PM   #46
crofrog
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Originally Posted by 4corners14 View Post
It's nice to know who to go to for all the answers.
Stop taking yourself so seriously...
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Old 09-27-2012, 07:07 PM   #47
kdscoates
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Originally Posted by Douf View Post
It's a handful offroad for sure. However, if you're thinking of using it mainly as a streetbike, it isn't particularly powerful in the grand scheme of things.


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Old 09-27-2012, 07:19 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by DiasDePlaya View Post
If you are big, you are in good shape and has ability to drive, or mountain biking experience I do not think the 990 will be a problem. But if you do not exercise, are overweight or not a good driver, you probably will have problems and will lose money on the 990.


Damn good thing my fat, beer drinking, bicycling hating, out of shape ass bought a 950
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Old 09-27-2012, 07:22 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by ykrweb View Post
I think if you have to ask this question then its not the bike for you. Could you ride it? Absolutely. Would you be able to use it for what its intended for? Probably not. It's a giant dirt bike with an angry engine. It's designed to go 100MPH in the desert not 10MPH in the city. Don't get me wrong. I think its a beautiful thing and I ride it 5 days a week but if your not an aggressive rider its a waste of money. I've always loved big powerful dirt bikes (Cr500, yz400f, MXC525) and the 990 was a natural progression. I had to have it. My 18 year old can ride it well but he grew up shredding single track in Ca and Or. If your the kind of rider that can't easily do a wheelie, power slide or get some air in the dirt then pick something more mellow.
you guys keep this shit coming!!!!

you can't make this shit up!!!!
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Old 09-27-2012, 10:03 PM   #50
GoNOW
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Here is a story on when I first got my KTM 950. Before this, I had an old CT110 and a TW200 I road now and then. And I played on friends bikes a bit. No real experience on the bigger bikes.
The 950 was my dream bike and when I found one used, I jumped on it.
I dropped it a lot going slow. Busted up the front fender, bent, welded, and bent the crash bars. I was not riding the bike, but just hanging on.

About the 5 trip out, I went for a turn, but because I had yet to really figure out how to drive it, I could not get the bike to lean and I went off road. Down a 4 foot drop and smashed into several rocks on the way down, all doing about 45 MPH. The bike saved it. I was smashed against the tank and don't remember the impact, but I was still upright.
I was able to ride it home, but I totaled both front and rear rims and bent some spokes. I was out in the middle of a field and if I had crashed, nobody would have a clue where I was.

I was not until years later when I took several riding classes that I became comfortable on the beast. I figured out the best way to control the big bike was standing, and I forced myself to learn the balance the beast. No really. If I am sitting, I am on pavement. Off road, I stand 90% of the time.

I spent a lot of time paying around at going really slow in abandon parking lots. It really helped. I took a MSF dirt bike class and the instructor said I bought the wrong bike and would have to skip out of most of the skill events. I was able to easily perform all but one, and that was do to a heavy bike trying to go sideways on a sandy hill. Everyone was impressed. The big bikes can go slow, but you really have to dedicate yourself to learning it.

All in all, I would say my beginner skills, where totally useless on the big bike. Forget everything you knew about dirt riding because it's totally different on a 500 pound bike. The handle bars are for you to hang on with. You steer with your feet. How messed up is that?

So, if you are going to get a big KTM (and I would not suggest it), I would take one of the big bike classes offered by Jimmy or Ned right away. Really, the day you buy the bike, sign up for the class. Then stick to the street and easy dirt roads until you take the class.

I am currently looking for another bike in the 400cc range to sharpen my skills on. My KTM crash bars can't take much more.
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Old 09-27-2012, 10:25 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by GoNOW View Post
All in all, I would say my beginner skills, where totally useless on the big bike. Forget everything you knew about dirt riding because it's totally different on a 500 pound bike. The handle bars are for you to hang on with. You steer with your feet. How messed up is that?
I can't disagree more.
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Old 09-28-2012, 01:07 AM   #52
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Did you ride one yet? Good test ride would give you some idea what you're getting into. While this forum has some good advice, especially on the technical side of things, the riding advice, well, varies from good to 'strange'. There must have been dozen post's on 990adv as the first bike, and without knowing the person buying it, you cant really say, should he or shouldn't he. Go ride one and then decide, who knows, you might hate the beast.
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Old 09-28-2012, 07:59 AM   #53
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I had no idea this forum was so heavily populated by guys with the talent of David Knight, Johnny Campbell, Jimmy Lewis, and even our own Ned Suesse. I'm honored to be in the company of such outstanding riders.

This thread is rad.

But what do I know? I'm sitting at Statbucks typing this on my iPhone. Lol.
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Old 09-28-2012, 08:34 AM   #54
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When I asked this same question most responses were to start smaller. I went with a TE610. It was a handful learning to ride trails here in Kentucky. Some technical and tight terrain along with more open tracks. I would not have been happy with the 950 and should have been on a smaller bike really. Do yourself a favor and get a 2-300 to learn trail technique and move up. Otherwise you will suffer, trust me. At 300lbs the 610 is a beast in the tight stuff when learning; the 950/990 will make you pay dearly for your education.
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Old 09-28-2012, 08:36 AM   #55
crofrog
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Originally Posted by buffallodan View Post
When I asked this same question most responses were to start smaller. I went with a TE610. It was a handful learning to ride trails here in Kentucky. Some technical and tight terrain along with more open tracks. I would not have been happy with the 950 and should have been on a smaller bike really. Do yourself a favor and get a 2-300 to learn trail technique and move up. Otherwise you will suffer, trust me. At 300lbs the 610 is a beast in the tight stuff when learning; the 950/990 will make you pay dearly for your education.
Word. I started on a DRZ400, then got a 950, then got a KTM 200. The 200 has been by far the bike that's allowed me to learn the most on.
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Old 09-28-2012, 08:36 AM   #56
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Agree!

Quote:
Originally Posted by flux_capacitor View Post
I had no idea this forum was so heavily populated by guys with the talent of David Knight, Johnny Campbell, Jimmy Lewis, and even our own Ned Suesse. I'm honored to be in the company of such outstanding riders.

This thread is rad.

But what do I know? I'm sitting at Statbucks typing this on my iPhone. Lol.
+1 I couldn't agree more.......all except for the coffee part, I can't stand the stuff. All the supposed self importance gets old quick.
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Old 09-28-2012, 10:28 AM   #57
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My 950 is my second bike. I am a 42 year old 5' 7" 160 lb female. My first bike was a 1986 Honda Interceptor 500 that I owned for two years when I was 25. I attest most of my experience and ability on the 950 to my lifelong mountain biking experience. I like to ride technical down hill fast. Not crazy bomber drop-off stuff, but cross-country style trails.
I know my limits, and like to push them in appropriate circumstances. I can pick the bike up by myself. I do not ride off road alone. I NEVER drink and ride.
My husband has the 1200GS and I had ridden that a few times before buying my bike. I chose the 950 because we like to load up the bikes and go on trips that have long stretches of freeway leading to curvy mountain roads leading to dirt roads where we find a place to pull off and camp for the night. I felt that a bigger bike would be more comfortable on the freeway fully loaded. My options were a farkled 650GS or a not so farkled 950 based on my price range.
I took an off road coarse where I rode a loaner dirtbike that helped but most of my info I have gleaned from these pages.
Best information learned so far- standing on the pegs helps A LOT , and on dirt or gravel roads lean the bike in, keep body weight on the outside of the curve with the outer peg weighted (opposite of road riding and very counter-intuitive to me).
Go on rides with buddies and practice the basics. Read my ride report for some more in-depth stuff. This was the first trip I went on where I felt that I got in over my head and my second trip on the bike. The 950 is a very capable machine if you are capable enough to push yourself a little and trust it enough.
I mostly comes down to your own aptitude and mental ability. Riding is so much mental, more that I imagined. My hardest physical day (see ride report in my sig line) was one of the most mentally taxing things I have ever done.

***Edit to add: I LOVE my bike. If I could afford an additional smaller bike to shorten my learning curve I might, but I don't think I would ride it much. I wouldn't exchange the Katoom for anything.
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Old 09-28-2012, 11:23 AM   #58
Kelvininin
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I am a seasoned cruiser and touring bike rider. Before the KTM I had Honda, and Victory Cruisers, I currently have a Victory Vision and a KTM Adventure. I ride a good amount, between 20K and 30K miles a year, almost exclusively on the road. I am extremely aggressive on the Victory Vision, often out pacing crotch rockets on the twisty mountain roads of the pacific northwest. The KTM Adventure is my first off road capable bike. In the two years I have owned it, I have been off road three times, once got myself into trouble, dropped it a few time.

I love both bikes, admittedly the Vision is my true love. So why the KTM Adventure?

I bought it for two reasons, one for commuting, one to open the off road options to me as a rider. My KTM has 6000 miles on it 5500 of those are on road commuters... Overkill for commuting? Absolutely, but man its a fun bike to ride.

I like it for commuting because I can easily work my way through traffic, which in the Seattle area, there is plenty, it has tons of power, and I can negotiate urban obstacles such as curbs and side walks.

The A990 is not a cheap bike, I could have done the job with something much less, but I have no regrets. Love the bike, but will admit, it is not a good first bike... Its mean, its tall, and can be unforgiving. I would highly recommend a more mild manner bike for a fist bike... If you are a seasoned rider, knock yourself out.
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Old 09-28-2012, 12:15 PM   #59
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If the price is really good, I mean really good, then as one poster said, "get it". But having said that I would also go buy another bike, something like a XL350R maybe even a XL600R (I've had both) and go beat the crap out of those in the boonies, have a blast, learn as much as you can and just sit on the KTM and work your way into it.

Some people out there can go from a 90cc to 900cc and succeed, though the odds are against you. Maybe you're the one that will. I would probably error on caution and definitely hold off taking a 990 out in weeds. right now. Don't want to sound all gloom and doom, but if you never taken a heavy bike out in the rough then you don't want to do it on an expensive bike initially. Your "really good deal" could become a liability very fast.

I don't own any KTM myself but am considering the 990 or a GS. Last "adventure" bike I was on was a Cagiva Gran Canyon 900 this summer. Fun bike and I loved it, but proper "adventure" bikes are beasties in every respect - especially when loaded down.

Just make sure you know what you're doing, have fun and be safe. Good luck!
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Old 09-28-2012, 02:11 PM   #60
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my first offroad moto as an adult. current street/track rider, former mtn biker

heavy to repeatedly pick up
hard to change the oil
hard on the wallet when/if it needs something
bummer when your buds are further up front on the tight trails with their smaller "toys"

big and beautiful. go buy it
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