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Old 10-01-2012, 05:53 PM   #16
mark1305
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Logically and theoretically pressure feeding from the bottom is the best method.

The only real drawback is possibly overfilling the reservoir and spilling brake fluid all over painted parts.

Have a helper watching the M/C reservoir to tell you when to stop pushing fluid.
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Old 10-01-2012, 05:56 PM   #17
mike in idaho
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When you finally get fed up with trying to bleed this thing, take it apart and clean out both holes in the bottom of the reservoir (there are TWO holes there, one is very small).
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Old 10-01-2012, 06:04 PM   #18
Lomax
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My bouts with Airhead brake bleeding.

First, the syringe method and push fluid up from the slave cyl. Uh make sure you keep emptying the master cyl.

Another thing you can do for an initial bleeding is to take the slave cyl off, block it so the pads will not come out, hold it ABOVE the master cyl with the bleeder valve on top. Pump and bleed like normal. The idea is that the air will rise up and out the bleeder screw.

What has actually worked for me is the vacume bleeder. It gets frustrating but works. The last one I did was on a dual disk front end. I just kept at it giving it a rest from time to time and after two days had great brakes.

Marc
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:18 AM   #19
svejkovat OP
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Thank you mike in idaho. Too bad you weren't with me in the garage when I started this odyssey so that you could have applied your advice with a hammer... to my head.

You mentioned two holes. I checked. Indeed, as I pointed out, with graphics, there was only one. You said the other was "tiny". I looked and probed again. Nope, just a blank recess in the right hand hole. I poked around with a pick. Nothing.

So I kept on posting questions, scratching my head, and contemplating full rebuilds and expensive bleeding tools. I reread the hyper fas-tedium of these pages again...www.bmwmotorcycletech.info/brakes.htm

Quote:
mike in idaho • Yesterday 05:56 PM
When you finally get fed up with trying to bleed this thing, take it apart and clean out both holes in the bottom of the reservoir (there are TWO holes there, one is very small).
Ok, ok. Just to satisfy your nagging I had another look. Nope, no "small" hole. Wait a sec. WTF? At the bottom of that 5mm recess is a hole approx 0.40mm small. 0.40 mm??? I never would have found it on second look If I hadn't been poking around with sewing needle this time. Well of COURSE it's clogged! For Christ's sake why wouldn't it be? And why WOULDN'T (he deserves this abuse of caps by the way) Mr. R Fleischer .esq have seen fit to mention this little tidbit EVEN ONCE in his exhausting anal-ysis of BMW brakes?
http://www.bmwmotorcycletech.info/brakes.htm

Thanks again mike in idaho. I chased out the hole with the finest wire I could find and up from the hole came a-bubblin' air. The brakes bled just fine after that via the conventional two handed method that's worked well in the past. All the components in this system are original (save the master plunger) so I'm just going to wait on a teardown/rebuild since it appears to be working like new right now.

svejkovat screwed with this post 10-02-2012 at 08:27 AM
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Old 10-02-2012, 05:21 PM   #20
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Here's a tip for after the fact that helps with any tiny tiny clogged openings in carbs, brakes, whatever. Pick up a welding tip cleaning tool as used on oxy-acetylene torches. It has wire probes covering a huge range of very small diameters and they are designed so that if the tip of the wire probe fits in a hole, the rough part will clean out the hole without reaming it larger.

Inexpensive and found at any welding supply shop.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:09 AM   #21
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That's it. I'm jus getting old. As read that post I remembered that I have one of those in my "welding" odds/ends drawer down stairs. I only tig, but I got a box of odds and ends at a garage sale a few years ago and since that one only applied to mig I just forgot about it!! You're right. Folds up like a feeler gauge set and has lots wire sizes nicely corrugated for cleaning.

Thank you for reminding me.
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Old 10-03-2012, 12:54 PM   #22
mark1305
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Always glad when I can help in any small way.

And when you start forgetting some tools you already have, it just means you are starting to get closer to having "just enough" tools.
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:06 AM   #23
Ron Seida
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Bleeding motorcycle brakes.

When i bleed motorcycle brake, this works well for me: If your brake pads are worn out, leave them in until you bleed the system as they will help you. With the calliper mounted on the bike, attach a piece of plastic tubing to the bleeder. Make sure it fits tight, you can use a zap strap to make sure. Also, make sure its long enough to easily reach your brake fluid reservoir. Using the front as an example, loop the tubing up over the front fender above the calliper, then back down to the ground to empty into a clear jar. Open your fluid reservoir and open the bleeder screw one full turn. Fluid should start to slowly creep up the line, this is good. Slowly pump the front brake, releasing quickly. You may have to cover the reservoir as often fluid may squirt up when you initially pump the lever, this is normal. Wait until the reservoir is almost empty before adding fresh fluid, by this time, the tubing should be full of fluid until it bends over the fender and spills into the jar. You can now see the old dirty fluid and the little bits of stuff floating around in your brake system. Keep pumping and adding fresh fluid in until the tubing is full of clean brake fluid. If there are no bubbles, then your done. Close the bleeder, carefully disconnect your hose and top up your reservoir.
If you are bleeding a fresh system, like after changing a brake line, you need to continue pumping until all the air is gone. This is easier to accomplish if you run the hose directly into the reservoir as the fluid is all fresh, then you just re-cycle your fluid as your removing the air from the system. Just hold a clean rag over the reservoir while you pump if it is squirting out. I'll use some electricians tape to hold the hose in place. If your having problems getting all the air out, then close the bleeder. Take a screw driver and CAREFULLY pry open the (worn) brake pads, pushing fluid back up into the reservoir, check for air bubbles. then pump up the brakes to close the pads onto the disc, open the bleeder and continue recycling the fluid until all the air is gone. Continue this procedure until there are no bubbles escaping from the bleeder. I prefer this system to the air operated suction bleeders because you can see of you have even the slightest bit of air left in the system. I have used this system for years on both customers bikes and my own with 100% success.
NOTE! Until you get good at this, there is a good chance you might get brake fluid in places you don't want it, like on your paint! I keep a spray bottle of soapy water and lots of clean rags nearby just in case.
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