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Old 05-17-2014, 08:21 AM   #1
irishmatt18 OP
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Started off good.

So my little story. Although its a little old now the anniversary just happened last month.

So, I was out riding with my buddies in the Rio Puerco in NM outside of Albuquerque. Normal riding after a few weeks of some rain. We took a loop we normally didn't take and near the halfway point, about as far out as we can et from cars and any cell phone service, I ran ahead and hit two blind jumps. 1st one was GREAT so I hit second one harder and behold, deep wash out. I was on my two stroke. Pinned in 4th gear when I hit it. Was about 30 ft deep, about 60 ft across. Knew it was going to be bad and ditched the bike. Hit the ground and one of two things happen, either my foot planted and folded over handle bar or it touched the spinning rear tire and was kicked out. BAM.. first broken bone, or should I say bones. I snapped that puppy faster than an 18 year old girl losing her virginity at prom... I was with a buddy and his two boys. The youngest went off with me seconds later and he was able to throw his bike away from crushing me and landed between mine and his, but he was ok.

Broke Tib/Fib mid fracture... Closed fracture.


Well, we were an hour and a half ride out from the nearest vehicle and cell service, forget it. I knew about where I was and by chance that area had a water conservation thing going on and they had made a LARGE dirt road back to that area but my buddy though I was talking outta my ass. He finally listened and road out to get his truck, loaded his and one of his sons bike and drove back. They had to carry me about 200 yards and I had to sit in the back seat of his truck and hold my thigh up and rest my foot (still in the boot) on the ground to keep the bones from scraping. We then headed to the VA (since it was my only coverage as I am a combat vet). Half way there I knew his truck was not ideal for the long drive so we met his wife with my truck and I had to switch halfway there... Not fun. Needless to say I finally got there and got some meds, but this was only the beginning of my problems.

Time line:

1505 - Crashed
1725 - Truck arrived
2145 - Arrive at VA getting first bit of drugs.

When I got to the VA, by this time starting to really feel the pain, the doc asked me what happened. I told him I broke my leg and he asked me how I knew that. Frustrated, knowing that it made noise earlier, I rubbed the bones together to make a noise and screamed out in pain and told him "cause you can hear the bones F-ing making noise!!!!"

Long story short.

The next day I have surgery and they rod my leg. The following night my body went into failure mode and I ended up on life support.

For some reason I had contracted ARDS (adult respiratory distress syndrome) and then I went septic, pneumonia, lungs failed, kidneys failed, and a whole bunch of other little things.

Docs had NO idea why. I was in top physical shape (federal agent who just completed our academy) and never smoked or done drugs or anything.

They attributed it to the fact that when I first crashed instead of going into shock like I should have, I prevented myself from doing so. I did this because being a combat vet, I knew the importance of keeping my wits and making sure we got out of our situation in the desert. Only once I got to the VA did I finally relax and that with the large amounts of morphine really screwed me up.


Anyways, I sold that bike and now a few years later I am out riding again. Instead of one bike I now have three and because of the accident my now wife and I were finally able to "meet up" like we had talked about for months prior (I knew her in high school and we had been in touch for years but did have a chance, I told her she only came to hospital to cash in on my life insurance policy being the first time we "saw" each other I was in a coma).


Either way, back to riding and learned a great lesson... Next time jump further... Jk...

Look before you leap.


Couldn't find the broken leg pic








That thing was in my neck, pretty crazy...


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Old 05-17-2014, 10:49 AM   #2
Homey
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Originally Posted by irishmatt18 View Post
So my little story....
I think the moral to the story here is: know what you're jumping before you jump it...just a thought anyway.
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Old 05-17-2014, 11:30 AM   #3
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Ah yes….the old "Look before you leap" axiom.
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Old 05-17-2014, 11:44 AM   #4
Kommando
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Don't outride your sightlines without a good spotter.
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Old 05-17-2014, 12:14 PM   #5
irishmatt18 OP
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Yeah normally I NEVER EVER take lead and this one time I jump ahead because my helmet was already on I paid for it. I will still lead but these days I do look first and take it easy.
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Old 05-24-2014, 05:16 AM   #6
wuaname
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Ouch... That must have sucked
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Old 05-24-2014, 05:20 AM   #7
Frank06
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Interesting physiological response... glad to hear you made it to the hospital.
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Old 05-24-2014, 07:07 AM   #8
Bill Harris
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Quote:
...and now a few years later I am out riding again. Instead of one bike I now have three and because of the accident my now wife and I were finally able to "meet up" like we had talked about for months prior...
"All's well that ends well"

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Old 05-29-2014, 05:12 PM   #9
Bobbyrider
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damn, that sucks!
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Old 05-29-2014, 08:06 PM   #10
BeMeUp
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Doc gave U ARDS

"For some reason I had contracted ARDS (adult respiratory distress syndrome) and then I went septic, pneumonia, lungs failed, kidneys failed, and a whole bunch of other little things"

Soooo, they knocked you out for surgery ,yes? At which point they entubate you. That tube they shoved down your throat and into your lung, happened to have a nasty little bug (thats been getting stronger and more resistent to antibiotics in order to survive in a hostpital) riding along ,in or on, that tube. And surprise ,surprise , all of the sudden you go from tough guy with a broken leg. To slab of meat fighting for your life.

Hostpital born infections are brutal and not uncommon. Surgery enduced septic shock often (I want to say 80 %) ends in death.

Glad you came out OK. It's only because you were in exellent shape going in.
My daughter had similar experiance while in Spain. The extreme cocktail of antibiotics they had to pump into her to kill the infection, left her nearly deaf but alive.
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