ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Thumpers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-02-2012, 10:08 AM   #31
Bultaco206
Back-to-back motos suck
 
Bultaco206's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Mineral Point, WI
Oddometer: 1,546
I have a V-Strom. It's a fun bike with limitations. No way I'd take it half the places some of these guys do. It just doesnt appeal to me to ride it like that. I've done it. And I don't care for it. Does that mean the bike isn't for me? Nope. I enjoy it in other ways.

I also have a bored KLX. Again, fun bike. And it goes places the 'Strom can't...with a lot less effort. But even as the terrain dictates when I'm on that bike, it can be a handful at times and makes me wish I was on my Trials bike. I choose the tool based on the task at hand.

And, I have a couple of race bikes...each suited for certain disciplines. Each is better at certain things just like the bikes above and I choose accordingly. This system I have is for ME. They are my bikes and I pick the one that will give ME the most overall enjoyment for the type of riding I choose to set out on.

Point is, I thank the original poster for his opinion. But it's only that...his opinion. He's obviously tuned in to his machine and enjoys it. I'm tuned in to my bikes and enjoy them, too. But I never begrudge anyone for their choice in bikes...or how and where they choose to ride them. He seems to want to poke a bit at those that don't share his motorcycle ephinany. I think that's a little elitist. But that's MY opinion.

You guys that ride 500 lb behemoths off-road...you go! And keep posting the pics. And you that ride dualsport tiddlers...keep at it. Whatever you ride, keep riding it. And keep us informed of your progress.
__________________
'07 DL650, '06 DR650, '06 KLX351, '97 DR350, '83 XR350R (vintage GP racer), '74 Bultaco Alpina (trials)
Bultaco206 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 10:12 AM   #32
acesandeights
Asperger
 
acesandeights's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: So. Oregon
Oddometer: 3,368
I guess I just read the OP differently. I read, "gravel/ dirt routes" and saw the picture posted of a road a Honda Goldwing could navigate. I feel bad for people that have to ship their bike when a big bike will travel gravel/dirt routes just fine and you can ride them to and from the trail.
__________________
http://breakingbooks.wordpress.com
http://www.kenmarshallmetalworks.com/
I may not be Rainman, but I'm not stupid eighter. Like Bartek on a taco.

I'll die with this hammer in my hand.
acesandeights is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 10:17 AM   #33
Kommando
Grumpy Young Man
 
Kommando's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Spacecoaster FL
Oddometer: 6,444
I got the DR650SE because it has enough power/torque, gearspread, stability, and smoothness to also run slab...2up and on a budget. It's about as tall and heavy as I would want to ride offroad. Bigger people may be fine on some of the heavier beasts. I dump it a lot, mostly from lack of skill and short legs, but I'm strong enough to pick it up, repeatedly, by just grabbing the bars. Using better technique makes it even easier.

Most of the smaller-displacement bikes that have enough power to slab are even taller than the DR, and they likely won't have the down-low torque to easily tractor up sandy hills with a passenger on the back. The DR actually isn't difficult to ride over most terrain I've yet encountered...as long as you have appropriate tires, AND you're not in a hurry. Don't try to keep up with real enduro bikes on a packmule like this unless you've got some serious skills.
Kommando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 10:18 AM   #34
Velociraptor
TrackBum
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: Seattle
Oddometer: 994
Quote:
Originally Posted by acesandeights View Post
I guess I just read the OP differently. I read, "gravel/ dirt routes" and saw the picture posted of a road a Honda Goldwing could navigate. I feel bad for people that have to ship their bike when a big bike will travel gravel/dirt routes just fine and you can ride them to and from the trail.
On the Baja trip we had a guy on a huge GS 1200 Adventure. I think he had one very minor crash the whole week. He was slow but steady and after the trip was over he rode the bike back to Canada! That was impressive!
__________________
2014 KTM EXC 500
2014 KTM 1290 Superduke R
2009 KTM 690r Enduro SOLD
2002 RC51 SOLD
2010 KTM 990 Supermoto R SOLD
Velociraptor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 10:42 AM   #35
Murf2
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Kansas
Oddometer: 768
I'm with Velociraptor. Dirt & Gravel roads could be done on most any bike. Do you guys on the little bikes haul them to your destination? I have been riding out & back to Colorado. I can't see me doing it on a small bike but maybe I should try.


Murf
Murf2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 10:45 AM   #36
acesandeights
Asperger
 
acesandeights's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: So. Oregon
Oddometer: 3,368
If I were hauling a bike to a trail, it'd be a performance bike, not a dual sport. If you're hauling a bike to the trail, you're taking the dual out of dual sport.
__________________
http://breakingbooks.wordpress.com
http://www.kenmarshallmetalworks.com/
I may not be Rainman, but I'm not stupid eighter. Like Bartek on a taco.

I'll die with this hammer in my hand.
acesandeights is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 11:04 AM   #37
Snarky
Vodka Infused.
 
Snarky's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Old El Paso and Swamp Houston
Oddometer: 1,342
The big issue it how far do you want to travel and how fast? After a couple of highway hours, I found my 225 single to be annoying. The lack of speed plus thumping got on my nerves.

The 650 Versys was great for a while, but it also felt strained at 80mph and I didnt have a lot of confidence in it surviving too many 8+ hour trips at high speed in heat.

The GSA is at least easier to service than that bike. Valve inspections are nothing serious. It's even easier to change tires and check the air filter. Plus the fuel lasts a good while longer.

That makes it easier to keep serviced after a ton of miles. Plus its fast, smooth, and comfortable.

If the offroad activity was in my back yard. Ida take a dirt bike. If its across town, ida take a small dual sport ~250. If its across the state, take a medium dual sport 400-650. Across the country? A heavier bike near the liter area.

Yeah youre more miserable offroad , but at least the 90% other section of your trip werent also miserable.
__________________
ALL ADDERS ARE PUFFS!
2012 BMW R1200 GSA, 2009 Kawasaki Versys (sold), 2001 Yamaha XT225 (sold)
PC Gamer? Support Star Citizen! Save PC Gaming and bring back Space Sims!
Pledge today! Service guarantees citizenship. @ http://www.robertsspaceindustries.com Thanks.

Snarky screwed with this post 10-02-2012 at 11:10 AM
Snarky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 11:12 AM   #38
ADVNCW OP
Banned
 
Joined: May 2012
Location: Leavenworth, WA- in the mountains!
Oddometer: 341
Great discussion THANKS!

Great discussion THANKS! I am trying to decide what I want to do.

I will do the CDR either on the 230L after hauling it to the start, or do the CDR the same with a new WR250R with a big tank. On the 230L I cary a 1.5 gal Kolpin on the front rack
and get over 250 miles range with that and the 2.3 gal stock tank- 73 MPG avg on the WABDR.I stopped at a dealer, they were looking at my loaded 230L, I mentioned I liked the WR250R, the handed me the key and said to try it. The WRR also felt small and easy to me on street and ripping around a dirt lot. In other words, WRR is pretty easy ride also, but it is nearly 30 lbs heavier than my little dog 230L. Way more fun to twist the throttle, however, on the WR250R!

To clarify:

The rig in the photo I have ridden singletrack and camped. With that load I went down a trail and decided to not take the next downhill- so I turned that little loaded bike easily on an 18 inch singletrack on am mountain sidehill; easy, no unloading, first try, no sweat. So I balance that kind of ease with the 'dog' performance on highway. As well, where I see so many photos of folks on larger bikes, even DR400s and up, struggle just on rutted rough roads, and I saw some of that myself. And I just fly with ease with that little (dog) 230L. I have put 6K on that rig loaded and unlaoded since May, on gnarly rocky mountin trails, gravel roads, crossed the state a few times from mountains to beach and back..

And, yeah, as I said, before the term was invented I was an adventure rider on gravel AK Hwy on my '75 GT750. I also had an open class Husky and Yamaha. But the 230L has advantages- gas mileage, small good-handling frame low weight, tractable power- limited wheel spin and fishtailing, just a smoothe ride- it gets the job done

Thanks again, I like reading the comments, good discussion!
ADVNCW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 11:13 AM   #39
BillMoore
Gnarly Adventurer
 
BillMoore's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Snohomish, WA
Oddometer: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by acesandeights View Post
If I were hauling a bike to a trail, it'd be a performance bike, not a dual sport. If you're hauling a bike to the trail, you're taking the dual out of dual sport.
Depends on where you ride. Around here, most places you have to have a license plate to be legal. If I'm going on a ride that requires 2 hours of freeway to get there, I'm trailering the bikes.
__________________
2012 Suzuki DR650SE
2010 Kawasaki KLX250S
BillMoore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 11:33 AM   #40
hugemoth
Beastly Adventurer
 
hugemoth's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Bend, Oregon summer, Snowbird in winter
Oddometer: 2,538
GPS elevation graph of a trail we took in August near Bralorne BC. Think it was called Steep Creek ATV trail. Soft stuff with some rocks, trees to duck under, just wide enough for an ATV, short runs with tight switchbacks. More than a 36% grade in some parts. Would love to have seen someone try it on a 500 lb bike! A couple ATVs were even abandoned along the trail.

hugemoth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 11:41 AM   #41
NJ-Brett
Brett
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Southern New Jersey
Oddometer: 6,088
I have had all sorts of bikes, none of them very good, but only the heavy bike got me a helicopter ride, and it was only a dr650 with no luggage, not even a heavy bike by 650 standards.

If you took back roads, you can use a smaller bike to get places, or the wr250 will do the interstate, but I always hated wearing out good dirt tires on the street.

Power is nice to have and fun, low weight makes riding easier and more fun, but unless you go race bike, you don't get both. You can live without power, while a lot of weight can ruin your good time with broken bones, so if I was going to do anything rough and far I would trade power for lightness.

The new crf250 looks like fun...
NJ-Brett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 03:01 PM   #42
ADVNCW OP
Banned
 
Joined: May 2012
Location: Leavenworth, WA- in the mountains!
Oddometer: 341
WR250Riders

WR250R riders- what down side or problems, if any, for traveling with a big gas tank on a WR250R?
ADVNCW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 03:49 PM   #43
Foot dragger
singletracker
 
Foot dragger's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
Oddometer: 12,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twilight Error View Post
I get *lots* of practice. My crashbars and fuel tank are pretty well scarred...
My ex flattracker beat up body wouldnt like picking big bikes up much. My DR650 is as big as I ride in the dirt,it seems very big at times when I try to play too hard with it.
530 KTM is much easier to bomb around on.
__________________
Some bikes around at times
Foot dragger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 03:53 PM   #44
Foot dragger
singletracker
 
Foot dragger's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
Oddometer: 12,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADVNCW View Post
Great discussion THANKS! I am trying to decide what I want to do.

I will do the CDR either on the 230L after hauling it to the start, or do the CDR the same with a new WR250R with a big tank. On the 230L I cary a 1.5 gal Kolpin on the front rack
and get over 250 miles range with that and the 2.3 gal stock tank- 73 MPG avg on the WABDR.I stopped at a dealer, they were looking at my loaded 230L, I mentioned I liked the WR250R, the handed me the key and said to try it. The WRR also felt small and easy to me on street and ripping around a dirt lot. In other words, WRR is pretty easy ride also, but it is nearly 30 lbs heavier than my little dog 230L. Way more fun to twist the throttle, however, on the WR250R!

To clarify:

The rig in the photo I have ridden singletrack and camped. With that load I went down a trail and decided to not take the next downhill- so I turned that little loaded bike easily on an 18 inch singletrack on am mountain sidehill; easy, no unloading, first try, no sweat. So I balance that kind of ease with the 'dog' performance on highway. As well, where I see so many photos of folks on larger bikes, even DR400s and up, struggle just on rutted rough roads, and I saw some of that myself. And I just fly with ease with that little (dog) 230L. I have put 6K on that rig loaded and unlaoded since May, on gnarly rocky mountin trails, gravel roads, crossed the state a few times from mountains to beach and back..

And, yeah, as I said, before the term was invented I was an adventure rider on gravel AK Hwy on my '75 GT750. I also had an open class Husky and Yamaha. But the 230L has advantages- gas mileage, small good-handling frame low weight, tractable power- limited wheel spin and fishtailing, just a smoothe ride- it gets the job done

Thanks again, I like reading the comments, good discussion!
I used to slide my 77 GS750 Suzuki around on gravel roads,it wasnt that big a deal and it never fell over. I did run it through some deep water over the alternator case and it never bothered it a bit. Lighter bikes are just safer for any kind of tricky riding.
__________________
Some bikes around at times
Foot dragger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 04:20 PM   #45
jon_l
Beastly Adventurer
 
jon_l's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Collingwood, Ontario
Oddometer: 2,738
OP - I am curious why you note a "new" WRR in each post? I assume money is not a significant issue for you, else you might consider used.

As you know, many used bikes come with expensive accessories (like gas tanks) for very little premium. There are lots of used WRRs out there with very few miles on them. Buy post 2008 if the early model fuel pump causes you concern. I bought my '09 in June with 3,400 km / 2,000 miles.

I haven't ridden a CRF230L. I have enjoyed a CRF230F, so yours is probably a fun scoot.
__________________
'09 Honda CBF1000; '09 Yamaha WR250R
jon_l is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 09:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014