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Old 12-07-2014, 10:34 AM   #1
V35A OP
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Super Tenere ES vs. Non-ES?

As most of you are aware, there are some great deals out there right now on new 2014 Tenere's. At the current prices I am very tempted to make a purchase.

I currently ride a 2013 DL650, which meets my needs reasonable well. But I would like something with a little more power and more features, such as cruise control, TC, spoked wheels, shaft drive, etc. My riding is limited to pavement and good two-track dirt/gravel forest roads. I avoid single track, mud, sand, water, etc. I do not use the bike for everyday commuting -- I mostly take it on weekend journeys into the Blue Ridge mountains or similar. I usually ride one-up with side cases, although I will occasionally make a two-up ride.

So, given my needs, do you guys think that I would benefit from the ES version, or would the base model work just as well for me? I am a relatively inexperienced rider, so I will not be as sensitive to suspension characteristics as some of you are. Other than the electronic suspension, there does not seem to be many significant differences between the two models.
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Old 12-07-2014, 11:12 AM   #2
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If your loaded weight falls within the designed optimum range of the ES, and if you change often between riding two-up and solo, you might really enjoy the ES.

I don't have a Tenere, but I just bought an FJR non-ES. I had both a BMW GSA and a K1300S, and just didn't use the ESA at all once I had the suspension roughly where I wanted it.

The idea that you can change it on the fly for varying road conditions really never played out that way for ME. Road conditions change quickly, and after awhile you just want to ride, instead of fiddling with menus. YMMV and all that...

My ideal is to have some quality aftermarket suspension set up for my weight and riding style. I may go that route eventually.
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Old 12-07-2014, 11:25 AM   #3
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Thanks for your comments.

I should have mentioned in my original post that I weight about 185 lbs.
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Old 12-07-2014, 11:58 AM   #4
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If you've not seen this article, it might help you to decide. I ride a lot of bumpy paved backroad stuff when I get a chance, and it's nice to be able to change the suspension on the fly or on a longer trip when you just want to smooth things out a bit for comfort. There are other features on the ES bike worth considering too for the extra price. Can't go wrong with either one, a good value for the $ right now.

http://www.cycleworld.com/2014/04/04...pecifications/
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Old 12-08-2014, 06:07 PM   #5
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If the dl650 is your first bike, you may want to get something a little lighter as your 2nd rather than jumping up close to 600 lbs. That can be a lot of weight to handle at low speeds or in dirt. Maybe the new 1000 vstrom instead?

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Old 12-08-2014, 07:43 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by atwoodtja View Post
If the dl650 is your first bike, you may want to get something a little lighter as your 2nd rather than jumping up close to 600 lbs. That can be a lot of weight to handle at low speeds or in dirt. Maybe the new 1000 vstrom instead?
Thanks for your comments. I have thought about that, but I really want shaft drive and some other features that are typically found on larger bikes like the Tenere and the GS. The V-Strom 1000 has chain drive, lacks cruise control, and has a relatively high cg (as does the DL650).

I am not sure how I will react to the heavier weight of a bike like the Tenere. I know several folks who bought huge Harleys as their first bike, and they have done reasonably well. A "lighter" option for me might be the new Tiger 800 XC, but it is still not exactly a light weight bike, and the cost would probably be more than a 2014 Tenere ES.

Not sure what my best option is.........
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Old 12-08-2014, 08:09 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by V35A View Post
Thanks for your comments. I have thought about that, but I really want shaft drive and some other features that are typically found on larger bikes like the Tenere and the GS. The V-Strom 1000 has chain drive, lacks cruise control, and has a relatively high cg (as does the DL650).

I am not sure how I will react to the heavier weight of a bike like the Tenere. I know several folks who bought huge Harleys as their first bike, and they have done reasonably well. A "lighter" option for me might be the new Tiger 800 XC, but it is still not exactly a light weight bike, and the cost would probably be more than a 2014 Tenere ES.

Not sure what my best option is.........
I'm not sure about the prices where your at, but right now out here Triumph 800 Roadies are just over 10k, 800XC,s are under 11k, Tenere (non-ES) are 11.5k, and Tenere ES's are 12.5k.

Don't know about now, but when I bought my 800XC 3 months ago they were offering heated grips, adjustable larger windshield, trunk, and trunk mount for free.

Jim
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Old 12-08-2014, 08:20 PM   #8
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I am not sure what current model Tiger 800 pricing is around here, but I would probably want the new for 2015 Tiger 800 XCx. I think that the MSRP on that bike is around $13.5K. Not sure what they will actually sell for, but I doubt it will be less than current 2014 Tenere ES pricing. I think I can get a 2014 ES for about $12.5K (or less) plus tax and tags.
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Old 12-09-2014, 03:13 PM   #9
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Some would say forget the ES model. Take that $ difference and dump it back into an Ohlins, Touratech or other quality shock plus fork valve tuning.

For the same $ you will have a much better suspended bike.
You'll find you setup suspension properly 1 time and hardly ever touch it again.

Heck you could probably even resell that brand new pull off rear shock to someone else (who has a high mileage and worn out one) to recoup some $. Pull it off from day 1 and I'd bet you could get a few $ bucks for it all day long.
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Old 12-09-2014, 06:19 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by eakins View Post
Some would say forget the ES model. Take that $ difference and dump it back into an Ohlins, Touratech or other quality shock plus fork valve tuning.

For the same $ you will have a much better suspended bike.
You'll find you setup suspension properly 1 time and hardly ever touch it again.


Heck you could probably even resell that brand new pull off rear shock to someone else (who has a high mileage and worn out one) to recoup some $. Pull it off from day 1 and I'd bet you could get a few $ bucks for it all day long.
That is, quite simply, not true. Weight of the rider and or passenger is the most critical aspect of setting up suspension.

A rider, or rider plus gear, or rider plus passenger, or rider, passenger, and gear are all very different and require different adjustments to have the ideal suspension settings. An after market suspension does not have anywhere near the versatility of the stock ES system.
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Old 12-09-2014, 07:15 PM   #11
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Super Tenere ES vs. Non-ES?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmac View Post

A rider, or rider plus gear, or rider plus passenger, or rider, passenger, and gear are all very different and require different adjustments to have the ideal suspension settings. An after market suspension does not have anywhere near the versatility of the stock ES system.


While I don't disagree with the idea behind this, I think "ideal" is a tough target for any suspension system - including any ES variety - when taking always-changing road conditions into account. While the ES is very handy for adjusting among available preferences, the fork preload, for instance, isn't adjustable. So while it's nice to be able to run a softer setup on the slab, and tighten things up on the curves, you're still compromising - just in a different way. You're choosing between settings that are generally good for the intended riding, but probably not excellent anywhere. Whereas with a custom aftermarket setup, you have to choose up front how you would like the suspension to feel, and consequently you'll have suspension that IS excellent in some conditions, less so in others.



You might decide that your two-up/sport setting is great on smooth pavement, but your next set of curves might be less technical, and rougher. So is the suspension still great? Isn't there now possibly a "better" setting? That's how I began to think about it when I had my last ES bike - which is when I finally just set it up with what feels good solo, added a little more preload to the rear when loaded, and forgot about it.
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Old 12-09-2014, 07:53 PM   #12
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While I don't disagree with the idea behind this, I think "ideal" is a tough target for any suspension system - including any ES variety - when taking always-changing road conditions into account. While the ES is very handy for adjusting among available preferences, the fork preload, for instance, isn't adjustable. So while it's nice to be able to run a softer setup on the slab, and tighten things up on the curves, you're still compromising - just in a different way. You're choosing between settings that are generally good for the intended riding, but probably not excellent anywhere. Whereas with a custom aftermarket setup, you have to choose up front how you would like the suspension to feel, and consequently you'll have suspension that IS excellent in some conditions, less so in others.

You might decide that your two-up/sport setting is great on smooth pavement, but your next set of curves might be less technical, and rougher. So is the suspension still great? Isn't there now possibly a "better" setting? That's how I began to think about it when I had my last ES bike - which is when I finally just set it up with what feels good solo, added a little more preload to the rear when loaded, and forgot about it.
The ES system may not be ideal but it can handle a much wider range of conditions or desired ride-ability. The load generated during spirited riding are vastly different than pounding miles on the slab. Very few riders only ride one way. They either put up with extra stiff suspension on the slab or slightly soft suspension in the twisties. After market suspension are set up for specific weight riders and conditions expected. One only has to look at the questions asked of any prospective buyer to see how they narrow down the set up.

I have 3 bikes. 2 have high buck after market suspension and the other is the Super Tenere ES. The Super Tenere is far more versatile over a wider range of conditions than the other 2. If I was given the choice I would choose the ES every time.
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Old 12-09-2014, 08:05 PM   #13
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If I was given the choice I would choose the ES every time.

Glad it is what you were looking for. That's why we're fortunate to ride in an age where there are so many choices.
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Old 12-09-2014, 09:44 PM   #14
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... An after market suspension does not have anywhere near the versatility of the stock ES system.

I would tend to agree. A friend bought a 2012 Tenere with $2,000 in serious Penske/Ohlins fork and shock upgrades, springs, re-valving, etc. We swapped bikes, and while we both felt his bike tracked a tad better for aggressive sport type riding, the new ES is really comfortable, does really well in sport mode settings, and the button adjustably on the fly is hard to beat fort the $ and the other options that come on the ES - especially if you are comparing to doing a full aftermarket suspension upgrade to a non-ES bike.
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Old 12-09-2014, 09:50 PM   #15
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There is nothing magical with the ES suspension parts. They are the same as the standard parts with a servo adjudging the screws for you. If you you think servo adjusters are better than high end suspension pieces then so enjoy it.
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