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Old 09-29-2013, 09:29 AM   #2851
JDowns OP
Sounds good, let's go!
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: Bassett, NE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhicheverAnyWayCan View Post
Where will you start your moto trip when you are back in Colombia?
Hi WhicheverAnyWayCan,

My bike is parked in Medellin Colombia, so that's where the riding part of this continuing South American leg of the trip begins on Oct. 30th when my plane lands.

As you may know from past experience, the trip begins long before you leave home. The most difficult part of these long trips is getting out of town. First you have to earn the money, then you have to arrange your life so you can be gone for an extended time. These can be the most difficult aspects of a long moto journey. It is all part of ADVriding. Which is why I have kept this ride report going through the last 6 months to show people it is possible to head off into far off lands even if you have limited finances like me and need to take a break to earn more money. There will be many things pulling on you like magnets to keep you home. Whether it is job opportunities, spouses, or concerned friends and relatives.

I have an easier time of it than some. Flexible work schedule, no wife or children and understanding friends and relatives. And now that I have a pile of cash and am heading back to Nebraska to mow the lawn and winterize my house, the excitement is building.

It is important to know that you will be running around taking care of a million things before you leave on a multi-month trip. And you won't be able to take care of everything so just focus on the important things like current registration on the bike, updated credit and debit cards that aren't going to expire while you're away, current passport, turning off the utilities, finding someone to forward your mail to, that sort of thing.

But there is no better feeling than the freedom you feel the day you head out of town and leave the workaday world behind. I find it refreshing. ADVriding is a state of mind. Riding all day through foreign lands, watching the scenery fly by puts you in an altered state of being. It is almost like you enter a different world where you are forced to relax and take life as it comes and adapt to it. It's not for everybody. But once you start it's hard to stop.

Saludos,
Juan Viajero
__________________
South America and back on a 250 Super Sherpa Minimalist Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=831076

JDowns screwed with this post 09-29-2013 at 09:37 AM
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:37 AM   #2852
WhicheverAnyWayCan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDowns View Post
Hi WhicheverAnyWayCan,

My bike is parked in Medellin Colombia, so that's where the riding part of this continuing South American leg of the trip begins on Oct. 30th when my plane lands.
Saludos,
Juan Viajero
Be in Medellin on Nov 5th. Although chance is very slim our path will cross but if that happens, would be cool to meet up. Will be in Cali on 7th or 8th to ride 1200GS for couple of days. Drop bike off in Bogota on 10th or 11th. After that-?? All depends on my mood and going with the flow.

Just wanted to get a taste of Latin America before my big trip in 2015 (wanted to do it next year but biker party @ my campground big 10th next year so..).
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:39 AM   #2853
Ratman
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Leaving from???

Where are you leaving from, John? I gathered that cheap tickets to SA were to/from Miami.

I imagine you've garnered a cheap ticket. Can you share that process with us?

Have a great trip. I'll be following closely. Thanks for blogging.
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:59 AM   #2854
WhicheverAnyWayCan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post
Where are you leaving from, John? I gathered that cheap tickets to SA were to/from Miami.

I imagine you've garnered a cheap ticket. Can you share that process with us?

Have a great trip. I'll be following closely. Thanks for blogging.
Ratman, try JetBlue. Can get as low as $198 one way from Raleigh-Durham (NC) here. I know that Southwest will be offering service to Colombia soon- think to Barranquilla. I learned that VivaColombia offer daily shuttle plane between Medellin/Cali/Bogota for $35-50 so you probably will save a lot if you fly to Medellin and get shuttle plane to Bogota or Cali separately or vice versa!

John might have a better way of doing this.
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:30 AM   #2855
JDowns OP
Sounds good, let's go!
 
Joined: Mar 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhicheverAnyWayCan View Post
Ratman, try JetBlue. Can get as low as $198 one way from Raleigh-Durham (NC) here. I know that Southwest will be offering service to Colombia soon- think to Barranquilla. I learned that VivaColombia offer daily shuttle plane between Medellin/Cali/Bogota for $35-50 so you probably will save a lot if you fly to Medellin and get shuttle plane to Bogota or Cali separately or vice versa!

John might have a better way of doing this.
I am leaving from Arizona where the cheap fare to Colombia is with Spirit Air. They fly out of Phoenix, AZ and have a hub in Fort Lauderdale, FL. It is really cheap from Florida to Colombia. Fares change regularly, but Florida to Colombia is usually the cheapest way to get to and from South America if you live in the U.S.

And as WAWC points out, VivaColombia is the cheap local airline for getting around once in Colombia.
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South America and back on a 250 Super Sherpa Minimalist Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=831076
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:40 AM   #2856
JDowns OP
Sounds good, let's go!
 
Joined: Mar 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhicheverAnyWayCan View Post
Be in Medellin on Nov 5th. Although chance is very slim our path will cross but if that happens, would be cool to meet up. Will be in Cali on 7th or 8th to ride 1200GS for couple of days. Drop bike off in Bogota on 10th or 11th. After that-?? All depends on my mood and going with the flow.

Just wanted to get a taste of Latin America before my big trip in 2015 (wanted to do it next year but biker party @ my campground big 10th next year so..).
Hi WAWC,

I'll make a point of being in Medellin on Nov. 5th.

Will be staying at the Shamrock up in Poblado area for a while to get my Colombia groove on. Drop by when you get to town. Look forward to meeting you.

Saludos,
Juan VivaColombia
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South America and back on a 250 Super Sherpa Minimalist Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=831076
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Old 09-29-2013, 02:20 PM   #2857
johnnybgood8
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I just started to read this and its nice to see some smaller and cheaper/older bike too. Im enjoying!
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:47 PM   #2858
woodly1069
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Location: Louisville, KY...really too far from the hills!
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JDowns... you sir are the real deal! Can't wait for more




Quote:
Originally Posted by JDowns View Post
Hi WhicheverAnyWayCan,

My bike is parked in Medellin Colombia, so that's where the riding part of this continuing South American leg of the trip begins on Oct. 30th when my plane lands.

As you may know from past experience, the trip begins long before you leave home. The most difficult part of these long trips is getting out of town. First you have to earn the money, then you have to arrange your life so you can be gone for an extended time. These can be the most difficult aspects of a long moto journey. It is all part of ADVriding. Which is why I have kept this ride report going through the last 6 months to show people it is possible to head off into far off lands even if you have limited finances like me and need to take a break to earn more money. There will be many things pulling on you like magnets to keep you home. Whether it is job opportunities, spouses, or concerned friends and relatives.

I have an easier time of it than some. Flexible work schedule, no wife or children and understanding friends and relatives. And now that I have a pile of cash and am heading back to Nebraska to mow the lawn and winterize my house, the excitement is building.

It is important to know that you will be running around taking care of a million things before you leave on a multi-month trip. And you won't be able to take care of everything so just focus on the important things like current registration on the bike, updated credit and debit cards that aren't going to expire while you're away, current passport, turning off the utilities, finding someone to forward your mail to, that sort of thing.

But there is no better feeling than the freedom you feel the day you head out of town and leave the workaday world behind. I find it refreshing. ADVriding is a state of mind. Riding all day through foreign lands, watching the scenery fly by puts you in an altered state of being. It is almost like you enter a different world where you are forced to relax and take life as it comes and adapt to it. It's not for everybody. But once you start it's hard to stop.

Saludos,
Juan Viajero
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Old 09-30-2013, 08:25 AM   #2859
bouldergeek
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This rededication and renewal of purpose manifesto is just what I needed to read this morning, sipping coffee and enjoying Chilean pan with Nutella in a Punta Arenas apartment. I just got the word that the box that I shipped $2000 worth of computers back to the US in was lost by the airline. So, I was feeling a bit down and tied to my lost stuff.

Thank you for reminding me that I am here because I, too, have done the hard time, made the choices, aligned the ducks, sacrificed and finally am ready to enjoy the journey.

As you move downward, I will be moving northward. I look forward to seeing you on this mighty mini machine. Perhaps Peru around December?
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Old 10-01-2013, 03:41 PM   #2860
jackflash252
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bump
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Old 10-01-2013, 09:36 PM   #2861
RACINGTHESUN
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Getting excited?

Wish I was riding with you John. I will eventually make it down to S. America. Will pray for a great and safe trip for you my friend, and as always love your RRs!
Doug
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Old 10-02-2013, 02:30 AM   #2862
johnnybgood8
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Hope that you get to the Argentina and Chile. On the best ride report ever. Its so cool to see that you can do it on 250cc bike with not too many fancy things.
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Old 10-02-2013, 08:41 AM   #2863
JDowns OP
Sounds good, let's go!
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: Bassett, NE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bouldergeek View Post
This rededication and renewal of purpose manifesto is just what I needed to read this morning, sipping coffee and enjoying Chilean pan with Nutella in a Punta Arenas apartment. I just got the word that the box that I shipped $2000 worth of computers back to the US in was lost by the airline. So, I was feeling a bit down and tied to my lost stuff.

Thank you for reminding me that I am here because I, too, have done the hard time, made the choices, aligned the ducks, sacrificed and finally am ready to enjoy the journey.

As you move downward, I will be moving northward. I look forward to seeing you on this mighty mini machine. Perhaps Peru around December?
Hi Bouldergeek,

Sorry to hear about your lost computers. It's always a bummer to lose stuff while you're out traveling. I can't remember the last long journey I was on where I didn't lose or break several things. My coping strategy is to put it behind me as quickly as possible and move on. The quicker I can laugh about it the better off I am, Easier said than done. I think it is one reason I am a minimalist when it comes to moto travel. Back when I rode a bigger more expensive bike and traveled with more stuff I cared about, it was much more difficult to relax. And more painful when I broke or lost expensive gear. I always had to keep an eye on my bike when in a cafe. And never felt good about hiking down a trail to see a waterfall and leaving the bike unattended.

I'm not saying it wasn't a downer to watch my bike get smashed against the pier in the Darien or jump into the ocean to load my bike into a canoe with my non-waterproof camera getting ruined in my pocket (doh!). Just that it was much less painful because it was a cheap little bike and a pawn shop camera. And believe me I was laughing sooner than I thought at the memory of six little Kuna boys hanging on for dear life to the back end of the Sherpa trying to keep it from going overboard while the next huge wave came in and pushed the full force of a seventy foot scow against the front forks and wheel, smashing it to bits. And me standing on the pier relieved that the bike didn't go into the drink staring at the leaking fork oil pouring out of the front forks that had been sheared in half thinking to myself, ruh-roh. It makes for great campfire stories later in life.

If there is any lesson in that, it is to reaffirm what I have learned after decades of long distance moto travel. Only take things that you can afford to lose. Less is more. Cheaper is better. Inexpensive high quality used gear is better than low quality new gear.

It is hard to overstate what a beating your bike will take riding to South America. Your gear will wear out eventually no matter how expensive it is to start with. Your riding pants and jacket will take a beating and start coming apart at the seams if you wear it every day whether you spent a grand or bought it cheap on Craigslist. Your helmet will get filthy and dinged up. Stuff will fall off the bike. You will be riding at times long days through miserable weather and find yourself setting things down absent mindedly and riding off without them. (My second camera may still be on the curb in the parking lot at Chichen Itza.) Everybody does it. The only difference with me is that instead of a camera worth hundreds of dollars, that second camera was an old Canon that my sister had in a drawer and gave me to take to South America. And instead of a 10 or $20,000 bike, I am riding a used little bike worth maybe a grand. And instead of a $500 helmet having 30,000 miles of tropical sweat and dings from where it slid off the seat onto the pavement over my last two Latin American journeys, I have a 50 dollar used Shoei from Craigslist.

I think it is important for people to realize that you don't have to spend a fortune to have a good time ADVriding. While there is nothing wrong with having nice gear and a brand new bike, I always like to imagine what it will feel like when I lose this item. Which is maybe why I don't have nice things. Well okay, I'm financially challenged as well.

One way I have found to keep from misplacing things while riding is to always put them away in the same pockets while riding. Bike keys are always in my jacket left square velcro closure side pocket so when I get on the bike I don't have to stand up and fish them out of my riding pants. Dummy wallet is always in my right square velcro closure jacket pocket with enough money for gas and food for the day. That sort of thing.

Wow! I really went off on a tangent. Sorry. All I really wanted to say is that I'm sorry for your loss and I look forward to seeing you down the road somewhere in South America. Safe travels!

Saludos,
Tio Juanito
__________________
South America and back on a 250 Super Sherpa Minimalist Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=831076

JDowns screwed with this post 10-02-2013 at 09:11 AM
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Old 10-02-2013, 09:12 AM   #2864
Idahosam
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDowns View Post
Hi Bouldergeek,

Sorry to hear about your lost computers. It's always a bummer to lose stuff while you're out traveling. I can't remember the last long journey I was on where I didn't lose or break several things. My coping strategy is to put it behind me as quickly as possible and move on. The quicker I can laugh about it the better off I am, Easier said than done. I think it is one reason I am a minimalist when it comes to moto travel. Back when I rode a bigger more expensive bike and traveled with more stuff I cared about, it was much more difficult to relax. And more painful when I broke or lost expensive gear. I always had to keep an eye on my bike when in a cafe. And never felt good about hiking down a trail to see a waterfall and leaving the bike unattended.

I'm not saying it wasn't a downer to watch my bike get smashed against the pier in the Darien or jump into the ocean to load my bike into a canoe with my non-waterproof camera getting ruined in my pocket (doh!). Just that it was much less painful because it was a cheap little bike and a pawn shop camera. And believe me I was laughing sooner than I thought at the memory of six little Kuna boys hanging on for dear life to the back end of the Sherpa trying to keep it from going overboard while the next huge wave came in and pushed the full force of a seventy foot scow against the front forks and wheel, smashing it to bits. And me standing on the pier relieved that the bike didn't go into the drink staring at the leaking fork oil pouring out of the front forks that had been sheared in half thinking to myself, ruh-roh. It makes for great campfire stories later in life.

If there is any lesson in that, it is to reaffirm what I have learned after decades of long distance moto travel. Only take things that you can afford to lose. Less is more. Cheaper is better. Inexpensive high quality used gear is better than low quality new gear.

It is hard to overstate what a beating your bike will take riding to South America. Your gear will wear out eventually no matter how expensive it is to start with. Your riding pants and jacket will take a beating and start coming apart at the seams if you wear it every day whether you spent a grand or bought it cheap on Craigslist. Your helmet will get filthy and dinged up. Stuff will fall off the bike. You will be riding at times long days through miserable weather and find yourself setting things down absent mindedly and riding off without them. (My second camera may still be on the curb in the parking lot at Chichen Itza.) Everybody does it. The only difference with me is that instead of a camera worth hundreds of dollars, that second camera was an old Canon that my sister had in a drawer and gave me to take to South America. And instead of a 10 or $20,000 bike, I am riding a used little bike worth maybe a grand. And instead of a $500 helmet having 30,000 miles of tropical sweat and dings from where it slid off the seat onto the pavement over my last two Latin American journeys, I have a 50 dollar used Shoei from Craigslist.

I think it is important for people to realize that you don't have to spend a fortune to have a good time ADVriding. While there is nothing wrong with having nice gear and a brand new bike, I always like to imagine what it will feel like when I lose this item. Which is maybe why I don't have nice things. Well okay, I'm financially challenged as well.

One way I have found to keep from misplacing things while riding is to always put them away in the same pockets while riding. Bike keys are always in my jacket left square velcro closure side pocket so when I get on the bike I don't have to stand up and fish them out of my riding pants. Dummy wallet is always in my right square velcro closure jacket pocket with enough money for gas and food for the day. That sort of thing.

Wow! I really went off on a tangent. Sorry. All I really wanted to say is that I look forward to seeing you down the road somewhere in South America. Safe travels!

Saludos,
Tio Juanito
Those are excellent words of wisdom JD; something one can only acquire through osmosis of life. It is a terrible thing to be consumed by worry of ones high end gear, etc.

Less is indeed more. Again I will be keeping tabs on your great wanderings of discovery on the mighty Sherpa.

Travel well!
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Old 10-02-2013, 09:26 AM   #2865
JDowns OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RACINGTHESUN View Post
Wish I was riding with you John. I will eventually make it down to S. America. Will pray for a great and safe trip for you my friend, and as always love your RRs!
Doug
Hi Doug,

You ARE riding with me. That's the nice thing about ride reports. You have to imagine it before you can do it. My job this winter is to keep your imagination cooking until your reality catches up and you're heading south.

Saludos,
Juan Imaginación
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http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=831076
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