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Old 10-05-2012, 08:34 PM   #61
DAKEZ
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It never rains in Oregon so I don't have any advice.
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:19 PM   #62
390beretta
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Smooth accelerating and smooth backing off the throttle! Slow down. Leave extra room. It's amazing how much traction modern tires, in good condition have in the rain. I actually watched a racer, trying to qualify in the rain, do slight wheelies when accelerating out of a corner; however, he was not dealing with all the road hazards mentioned above by other posters.
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Old 10-06-2012, 04:00 AM   #63
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To test how slippery the pavement is, while going about 10-15mph stomp on the rear brake. If it breaks loose easy, or if it doesn't lock tells how much traction is available. Usually I could definitely tell the difference between freshly wet pavement, and pavement after its been raining for a while.

However, now I am riding a bike with PR3's and ABS, the stomping on the rear trick just gives me whiplash
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Old 10-06-2012, 11:22 AM   #64
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These guys all hit on the good things.

Let me clarify though - "good" tires doesn't mean few-year-old tires with deep sipes (i.e. plenty of tread), the best tires will both have deep tread left AND be less than two years old (ideally, one).

My experience with a high-speed highway:

I used to ride the highways a ton for commuting to work and back, so in an all-out rain storm I'd still do 75 or 80 MPH. Any good motorcycle tire can easily not hydroplane at those speeds, even with some with standing water, but all the same - I'd look to ride the higher spots on the highway where one could see that the standing water was much thinner. Sometimes this meant riding closer (inches) from the painted lines but... it worked.

If you get to this point of riding highways regularly, keep in mind that mind that on straighter sections motorcycle can travel much faster than cars and pickups without hydroplaning, so don't be afraid to use that to your advantage to get away from them if you don't have tar-snakes to worry about. I routinely was the fastest thing on the rainy highway each 40-mile trip, where-as I wasn't in the dry (because I maintained the same speed wet or dry).

Yes, to some degree it is chancing it since stopping distances could be longer, but I did over 22k miles in a year this way, in south-Florida rains / monsoons / feeder-bands, and it wasn't an issue. I stayed away from cars who were trying to do similar speeds because they would hydroplane (and some probably did trying to keep up with me - drivers down here base their speed off of those around them instead of thinking for themselves... freshly hydroplaned and wrecked cars, trucks and tow trucks were an every-day sight in rains for those commutes).

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That said, keep in mind that in hard corners on wet two-lane roads, cars and trucks blow them and come into your lane when they were traveling too fast. Be ready for a vehicle in your lane on those tight and blind corners.

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Helmets - some are made much, much better than others. Close the vents that will draw in the most water (so forward vents, some top vents), and if your FF helmet's shield allows water seepage past its top-seal, think about getting a better helmet soon. It's just about never the water on the outside of a shield that is a problem - it's the droplets and moisture that accumulates on the inside that blinds you.

Before each rain ride I'd snap off my visor / shield and wash both sides with Dawn dishwashing detergent to clean debris that bugs can stick to. This was all I needed for rain to bead off at speed. I found out a long time ago that Rain-X increases road and light glare, and that effect was just too much for me to keep using it on cars or on anything else... especially at night. But a clean shield worked just as well, especially with occasional turns of the head to each side to push the water off.

For most rain riding I'd wear either sunglasses or clear protective glasses under the shield, inside of the FF helmet, so I'd have cleaner eye-protection for those times when the rain stopped and roads dried (nice so one isn't looking through a now-dirty shield from rain spatter).

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All important things in my pockets - like my wallet and cell phone, went into quality name-brand ziplock or other plastic bags. The debit card was kept out of it all, and either in a jacket pocket dedicated for it, or a front fanny-pack pocket, as it really doesn't matter if a debit card gets wet - and it's right there for fuel stops and such.
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Old 10-06-2012, 11:47 AM   #65
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I run Avon tyres on my 990 adv, as i am doing less dirt riding and they are too bad in the rain. I had few sets of Pirelli Scorpion DS tyres on it before, and the grip on wet asphalt was amazing. I think lot of riders are overly cautious in the rain, which is good thing of course, oil dripping from the cars at intersection etc. Someone mentioned aquaplaning and i certainly haven't ever experinced it on a motorcycle, in a car, plenty of times. The front hoop the 990 is 90/90-21 even the back one is a skinny 150, so not much of a chance of 'planing' there. I wonder how the 'car tyre on a motorcycle' crowd feel about this, rain riding business
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Old 10-06-2012, 11:49 AM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussijussi View Post
I run Avon tyres on my 990 adv, as i am doing less dirt riding and they are too bad in the rain. I had few sets of Pirelli Scorpion DS tyres on it before, and the grip on wet asphalt was amazing. I think lot of riders are overly cautious in the rain, which is good thing of course, oil dripping from the cars at intersection etc. Someone mentioned aquaplaning and i certainly haven't ever experinced it on a motorcycle, in a car, plenty of times. The front hoop the 990 is 90/90-21 even the back one is a skinny 150, so not much of a chance of 'planing' there. I wonder how the 'car tyre on a motorcycle' crowd feel about this, rain riding business
*Not too bad*
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Old 10-06-2012, 01:08 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussijussi View Post
I wonder how the 'car tyre on a motorcycle' crowd feel about this, rain riding business
I'm going to go out on a limb, here, and postulate that the car tires used on bikes, as a 'dark side' mod, generally aren't too wide, and that the front motorcycle tire (which is excellent at cutting through water) already cuts or pushed some of the water out of the way for that wider rear. As long as there is good tread on it, I would have felt OK with going Dark Side if I could have for all the rain commuting I did.

Granted, there is a component of weight-to-tread-width with hydroplaning, but on bikes that would go Dark Side the rider's weight is generally a lot more toward the back, and that should help a little.
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Old 10-07-2012, 11:26 AM   #68
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Good, sticky boots! If your boots slide, your bike will slide, too, particularly when you want to be stopped at a light or stop sign.

I ride all the time in Drizzledorf. It seems like it is always just annoyingly wet here, just enough to cause issues, but not enough to be truly fun.
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Old 10-08-2012, 01:25 PM   #69
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Just ride like you have a glass of water on your tank thats nearly full, and you dont want to spill any of it.
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Old 10-10-2012, 08:09 AM   #70
dukedinner
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Quote:
It never rains in Oregon so I don't have any advice.
LOL. The Pacific NorthWest rain is famous and most of us have no choice but to ride in a lot of rain. It also never rains in Prince Rupert where I live!!

My advice? Slow down, use good tires with correct pressure. On paved roads, always anticipate where the water is on the road and don't ride through the pooled water at speed. Don't follow traffic too close and don't let it pile up behind you. Keep your visor clean and invest in a system (Respro-foggy, Pinlock, etc) to stop your visor fogging..its hard enough riding in heavy rain with good vision, let alone without. Wear decent raingear and waterproof boots/gloves.
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Old 10-10-2012, 09:45 AM   #71
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I cant really add much but will comment on personal experience.

Current bike has 100K on it, I ride year round in all conditions.

Some tires just perform better in the wet and cold than others. On the V-Strom what i have found is the Tourances seem to have the best compound for all around riding and are "Sticker" in the wet. This is based on thousands of miles on them and other tires.

Shinko, Trailwings, TKC's, Caroo's etc etc.

All of the tires work, and like others have said slowing down and being smooth is key. What I have been told is the Tourances have a higher silica content than other tires which promotes its wet/cold weather performance.

Just my .02
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Old 10-17-2012, 08:57 AM   #72
Uncle Pollo
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In heav rain you can see better than in the car.
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Old 10-17-2012, 07:57 PM   #73
DAKEZ
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Stay Dry.

Stay Warm.

Have Fun.

RIDE RIDE RIDE





.
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Old 10-17-2012, 08:06 PM   #74
Mambo Dave
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Pollo View Post
In heav rain you can see better than in the car.
Yep - as an an addendum, I'll add another tip to what I wrote above. I would keep dish soap either with the bike, or at either end of your commutes, to wash the helmet's visor before each ride. A clean visor sheds water better allowing much better vision. If you dirty it up on the ride to work, like I did each 40 miles, clean it for the rain-ride home.

I'd use just one little drop of Dawn dish soap, then warm or hot water and wash / rinse / paper-towel-dry both sides. My current helmet is a bitch to put the visor back on, so I'd open he visor and wash it that way since the sink easily gave room enough for the helmet.

If I knew I was going into a rain ride that had a well-sealing visor, I'd probably add some electrical tape over the close top forward vent system to really block that from water entry. But if the visor lets rain seep past the top seal, then the tape is a mute point anyway. The rear vent can stay open for all I care.

I also very, very often wore impact-rated sunglasses or clear glasses under my FF helmet with the closed visor for rain rides. This really reduces the dirty water hitting your eyes or contacts in heavy-traffic, high-speed rain riding.
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Old 10-18-2012, 06:24 AM   #75
BanjoBoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Pollo View Post
In heav rain you can see better than in the car.
And the faster you go, the better you can see.
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