ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-01-2013, 07:34 AM   #331
RexBuck OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Interior BC, Canada
Oddometer: 997
Feb 22 – 25 Lima, Huacachina and Nazca

Meet a group of people staying in the hotel from Vancouver that are a team of surf paddlers. They are down here to compete in the World Stand Up Paddling Surfing Championship in Lima. Nice group.





After all the nasty reports I’d heard about riding through Lima, was a bit apprehensive and tried to time my departure so I would miss rush hour.

This area is very much desert with dunes of different types and sand everywhere. Must not be a lot of water around here as the only agriculture I saw were chicken barns . . . literally hundreds of these huge barns from Huacho almost all the way to Lima.





As we approach Lima the development gets thicker and traffic increases. With 60 km to go to the next turn, the traffic grinds to a crawl. I’m thinkin this is what everybody was talking about. Pretty crazy drivers going nowhere. Then realize the signs are still pointing to Lima. We aren’t even there yet. This is going to be a long day.

Carries on for a few kilometers then traffic starts to speed up. Start ticking off kms pretty steady. Traffic is dense but moving. I’m hungry, thirsty and need to water my horse but don’t want to get off the highway into what appear to be some congested streets. Finally figure out that the gas stations here are huge and pull into one to find a full fledged restaurant and a decent sized grocery store.

Had a rest and back on the road all ready for the imminent congestion. Look at the GPS and discover we are already through Lima. Well, that was easy.

A friend of mine at home is from Lima and his sister who still lives in Lima was kind enough to invite me to their beach house to spend a couple of days with her and her family. Really nice place and wonderful hosts.

Located in the small town of Santa Maria about 50km south of Lima, the community surrounds a club that includes a beautiful salt water pool and tennis facilities.







From Santa Maria, headed south to Ica and spent a night in Huacachina which is an oasis in the middle of some spectacular sand dunes. There are a whole bunch of these giant dune buggies that cart loads of screaming tourists over the dunes.





Couple of shots of the dunes









Then headed down to Nazca/Nasca – depending on which direction you come into town, you will see different spellings of the town’s name. Stopped at the Hotel Don Hono as recommended by Radioman but they were full and sent me next door to the Dunas Blancas. The same people must own both as they still had me park at the Don Hono. Nice place – 40 Soles (About $15).

Once I unloaded my bags I rode out to the airport to see if I could get a flight to see the Nazca lines. I pull up and I was greeted as if I was a long-lost son. They were sure excited. It looks like they had three people who had been waiting for quite awhile for a fourth and I was it.

Had to go through a metal detector which of course, I set off. The guy looks at my boots and I tell him he doesn’t want me to take them off. So, he does a bit of a pat down – then waves me through.

Half an hour trip flying over the 15 or so figures carved by the Nazcas between 200BC and 600AD.

There are more than one theory about the origin of the Nazca Lines and drawings. I think the idea that the lines were made by aliens makes the most sense. It’s pretty obvious that the lines are landing strips and navigation marks – look at this crappy pic of one of the figures but notice the lines around it. Landing strip and navigation lines? And look how straight they are – I don’t think they had laser transits back then. Just sayin





And, why else would the ancients have put a picture of an “Astronaut” on a hillside? Hmmm?




Of course, there are other theories by scientists and their ilk. You know, stuff about the area being so incredibly dry and the people were very focused on water. They were not only clever in finding ways to store and conserve water but were very active in appealing to their Gods to provide more water. So, the archeologists believe the lines and figures were related to the early people’s worship and sacrifices to encourage water.

The lines and figures were created by moving the darker surface stones to reveal the lighter colored hard surface underneath. Since there is no sand here to blow around, the lines and figures have remained since they were originally created. The Hummingbird.






The viewing tower next to the highway where you can view the Hands and the tree




Also of interest were the Puquios or aqueducts that are apparently still used. My understanding is that these cone shaped holes have a spiral path leading down to flowing water underground. Very ingenious.



Walked out in the street and notice a couple of travelling bikes in front of Don Hono trying to get a room. An Austrian couple heading to Ushuaia on what looked like DR650s. They were going to look elsewhere for a room.

As I was talking to the Austrians, all of a sudden there were dozens of people coming down the street in full costumes. Looked like dancers in a lot of different styles of costume. I thought they were heading to the plaza to perform and I would take some pics there but I guess they wre finished as they all disappeared in a number of hotels (guess that’s why I couldn’t get into the Don Horno). Did get a couple of the ladies to pose for me.





Nazca is a great little town and I could easily have stayed there another night. Very nice plaza that is well used at night by local families.




__________________
www.rexbuck.com - RexBuck's Latin America
Information on travelling in Latin America.
Includes links to ride reports to Mexico and to South America
RexBuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2013, 07:56 AM   #332
Cal
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary
Oddometer: 760
Rex following along here. I took a guide out to the spiral aquaducts and was able to climb down in them, some spirals are clockwise and some are counter clockwise. its my understanding that their purpose is for flood control of the underground portions. When a high volume of water comes through the water rises up and spins out so as not to destroy the tunnels. The water originates from the glaciers in the Mtns. and were dug by hand hundreds of years ago. My guide only spoke Spanish so some of what I learned may be off somewhat
Cal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2013, 12:31 PM   #333
RexBuck OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Interior BC, Canada
Oddometer: 997
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal View Post
Rex following along here. I took a guide out to the spiral aquaducts and was able to climb down in them, some spirals are clockwise and some are counter clockwise. its my understanding that their purpose is for flood control of the underground portions. When a high volume of water comes through the water rises up and spins out so as not to destroy the tunnels. The water originates from the glaciers in the Mtns. and were dug by hand hundreds of years ago. My guide only spoke Spanish so some of what I learned may be off somewhat
Hey Cal - thanks for following along.

That is very interesting about the spirals. Thanks.

I didn't even think to check around to see if I could go down the Spirals. That would have been cool.
__________________
www.rexbuck.com - RexBuck's Latin America
Information on travelling in Latin America.
Includes links to ride reports to Mexico and to South America
RexBuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2013, 12:50 PM   #334
Cal
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary
Oddometer: 760
Heading out to Mabel Lake tomorrow for a little R & R
Cal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2013, 04:53 PM   #335
Pete_Tallahassee
Out Standing Member
 
Pete_Tallahassee's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Location: Tallahassee. FL. USA
Oddometer: 135
Those snow capped mountains are real pretty.
The food looks good too.
Pete_Tallahassee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2013, 04:59 PM   #336
RexBuck OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Interior BC, Canada
Oddometer: 997
Feb 26 On the way to Cusco

On my way to Cusco. It is about 650 km and rather than making it a real long day and arrive in the dark, I split it in 2 with my first night in Abancay.

What a day. Fairly quickly out of Nazca we start to climb with pretty constant stretches of switchbacks and twisty roads. It was a delight.

Had to pass a convoy of my favorite vehicles, buses and got lucky with a couple of straight stretches. Stop for a pic and see those bastards creeping up on me a few switchbacks back. Go Go! Don’t let um catch ya.





Until we got to high altitude, it was very dry on the west side of the Andes.





Once we hit around 13,000 feet, started to see some vicuńas. Little buggers are worse than deer. There are gobs of them and they flit around like they are on crack.





Later, started to come across literally thousands of alpacas grazing on the wide open plateau. I think some are wild but many appear to be herded. They are pretty calm and rarely even look up when you drive by. There were some Llamas mixed in with them sometimes - they are quite a bit larger and more aggressive and are used as protectors of the alpacha. In some cases it looked like herds were over 200 animals.








I kept noticing very dark clouds on the horizon and wasn’t looking forward to the enevitable rain and/or fog. Once we got over 13,000 feet, most of the terrain was rolling hills. I could see snow at about the same level I was but everything seemed fine. Roads got quite wet as it looked like they had just had the rain. Good, I missed it! As I was approaching the peak, I felt a sharp shot to my right hand – like a big bug. But there aren’t any bugs up here . . . then it happened again. It’s frickin hail. Now the temp dropped from 6C to 1C (34F) and there was enough hail so truck tracks were showing on the road. Everything was turning white. Man how I miss the snow . . . .

At that point, wound up with a new altitude record, just shy of 15,000 feet.





Beautiful country as we start to descend.








Know you are in rainy country when you start to run across these water crossings





Was following along this river for quite awhile and stopped to take this picture of the river water boiling as it rushed downhill





Noticed a little gorge and thought I'd check it out. Found this sketchy bridge





Then decided to see if it would hold me so I could get a pic of the gorge (It did)





Got down to Abancay and found my hotel – El Peregrino. 80 soles (about $30) for a one bedroom apartment – great parking and great internet. They had some complementary Mate de Coca tea bags. Some places just throw some coca leaves in a cup and add hot water. It's supposed to help deal with altitude. Apparently it is legal in the highlands but not along the coast.




__________________
www.rexbuck.com - RexBuck's Latin America
Information on travelling in Latin America.
Includes links to ride reports to Mexico and to South America
RexBuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2013, 08:08 PM   #337
ONandOFF
-ROAD-
 
ONandOFF's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Shenandoah Valley riding wonderland
Oddometer: 5,326


Nice shots; good times.
We've got some of that coca tea here we picked up in Ecuador.
__________________
Let's ride!!! - No offense, but there've been a lot of people over time who were just as sure, yet got it wrong. - Una necedad, aunque la repitan millones de bocas, no deja de ser una necedad. - "you know that I could have me a million more friends and all I'd have to lose is my point of view" (Prine)
ONandOFF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 04:29 AM   #338
Sunday Rider
Adventurer Wanabe
 
Sunday Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: North of T.Ho., Ontario
Oddometer: 704
Wow, beautiful views and mountains. How's the bike running?
__________________
'97 Honda ST1100
Sunday Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 05:16 AM   #339
RexBuck OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Interior BC, Canada
Oddometer: 997
Thanks guys.

The bike is running great (touch wood). The only problems I've really had are with aftermarket stuff (ie: my spot lights) and the issue with my front tire. She has been very dependable.

I'd like to apologize here for being even worse than normal for posting updates. I've either had no internet, really lousy internet or been afflicted with one or more of: a cold / altitude / beer. I'm planning on a couple of days to try to get some updates done and plan the rest of my trip.

Thanks for your patience.
__________________
www.rexbuck.com - RexBuck's Latin America
Information on travelling in Latin America.
Includes links to ride reports to Mexico and to South America
RexBuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 05:31 AM   #340
Ulyses
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Oregon (the dry side)
Oddometer: 894
Hey man, good to see you back on the posting! Are you still in Peru? Are you planning on shipping your bike back home when you finish?
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 06:29 AM   #341
RexBuck OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Interior BC, Canada
Oddometer: 997
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulyses View Post
Hey man, good to see you back on the posting! Are you still in Peru? Are you planning on shipping your bike back home when you finish?
Yah, still in Peru - Arequipa right now. I really like Peru and could spend a lot more time here.

The plan is to get over to Buenos Aires and ship my bike back to the US somewhere. My problem is, I'd like to be there around the first of April so I'm running out of time for Bolivia, Chile and over to Argentina. Taking the whole Geezer thing to heart, I've been keeping my riding days fairly short (usually) and staying places for a few days just because I feel like it. Resulted in me being a bit behind so, will be a pretty superficial sampling from now on.

You have been having an epic adventure. You are doing it right.
__________________
www.rexbuck.com - RexBuck's Latin America
Information on travelling in Latin America.
Includes links to ride reports to Mexico and to South America
RexBuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 06:42 AM   #342
stevie88
That's gotta hurt
 
stevie88's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: The place dad always warned me about
Oddometer: 17,811
Quote:
Originally Posted by RexBuck View Post
Yah, still in Peru - Arequipa right now. I really like Peru and could spend a lot more time here.

The plan is to get over to Buenos Aires and ship my bike back to the US somewhere. My problem is, I'd like to be there around the first of April so I'm running out of time for Bolivia, Chile and over to Argentina. Taking the whole Geezer thing to heart, I've been keeping my riding days fairly short (usually) and staying places for a few days just because I feel like it. Resulted in me being a bit behind so, will be a pretty superficial sampling from now on.

You have been having an epic adventure. You are doing it right.
If you plan on making Tierra Del Fuego you're going to have to haul ass.
__________________
In Russia we have saying, "if it isn't broke, don't fix it". We also say, "if it is broke, don't fix it".
stevie88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 07:41 AM   #343
RexBuck OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Interior BC, Canada
Oddometer: 997
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevie88 View Post
If you plan on making Tierra Del Fuego you're going to have to haul ass.
My ass is too big and too old to haul that far that fast. Knew from the start I'd be too late for TDF. I think if I'd started in Prudhoe Bay, I'd be earlier here and more motivated to get to Ushuaia.

On this trip, If I had alloted myself more time I'd spend it in Peru and Bolivia.
__________________
www.rexbuck.com - RexBuck's Latin America
Information on travelling in Latin America.
Includes links to ride reports to Mexico and to South America
RexBuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 09:50 AM   #344
RexBuck OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Interior BC, Canada
Oddometer: 997
Feb 27 & 28 The ride to Cusco . . . but first, lets ride to Abancay???

Easy ride planned today of about 200 km to Cusco. What a beautiful road up over the Andes – just about all switchbacks and twisty roads. Leaving Abancay






As usual, spectacular, rugged scenery. Two dimensional photos don’t capture the vastness of these mountains and my photographic attempts turn out half-vast.













Thought I was going to get into some fog going over the 13,000 foot summit but just stayed under it then we were descending. Yahoo!

Got to about the midway point to Cusco and encounter a whole line of parked buses and trucks. So, I dutifully pass them only to find the mountain had slid onto the road completely blocking it.





Assessing the situation, there is no riding over it, there is no riding around it. One guy was trying to get me to ride down the 20’ embankment to the little trail along the river right below the slide – oh, that was over some 3’ diameter boulders. I don't know of many dirt riders that would try that with this pig. Then he was trying to tell me three people could carry my bike. My thought was “Maybe you and a couple of your amigos could carry it off to an ally in town but you just ain’t that husky to be carrying even a striped down 500 pound bike across those boulders.”

Most of the people on buses were packing all their stuff and scrambling down the embankment, walking under the slide and back up the other side to catch one of the buses on the other side to continue their trip.





The problem with that plan is that every once in awhile you’d hear a holler and this



Those big ones flying through the air were landing on the trail along the river. I don’t think anyone got hit with one of those but that’s all I’d need to be riding along the bottom and inadvertently try to stop a melon sized rock.

People were talking about 4 hours then 6 hours for the road to open – that was at one o’clock. I’m thinkin this is going to take longer than that, but what do I know? I remember seeing a hotel back about 15 or 20 minutes so I thought I’d check it out and maybe get something done. Fooled around there then it turned out that although they said they did, they really didn’t have internet. Fugit! Let’s go back and see how the cleanup is going.

Back at the slide at 3 and the equipment hasn’t even arrived yet. Now they are talking about mid-night. I can see where this is going.

A brief contemplation to figure out what to do with the rest of my afternoon. Why not go for a ride? Hmmm, any good roads around? Well, I do recall there is one to Abancay that is really outstanding. Why not? Back to El Peregrino Hotel we go.

Just a spectacular ride again. Got rain for about 20 minutes but that was it. There was no traffic going my way – all stuck at the slide. No buses. No trucks. Bonus! Had a really "brisk" ride back.

El Peregrino didn’t have any single apartments left but after I gave them a really long face, gave me a two bedroom apartment for the same price. Even nicer than the one last night. Livin large baby!

Had chicken and chorizo for dinner. Excellent! They even had a salad bar - a first I've seen in Latin America.






Announcement

I have just made a change to the RexBuck Latin American cerveza list. I am happy to announce that Cusqueńa Malta has moved to #1 position taking over from Mexico's Negra Modelo.





The next morning I'm off to see if they opened the road. Sure enough. Once I get to the other side, turns out there was actually two slides next to each other - the second one was at least as big as the one I have pics of. After watching the rocks tumbling down yesterday, I certainly wasn't going to loiter on that little road they cut through.





Encountered some pretty heavy rain for awhile on the other side but it was just as pretty.





I came across one little town and pulled to the side of the road and took these three pics. They are really typical of Peruvian small town life. Notice in the first pic there is something going on at the school but Grandma sitting on the grass on the left with the grand-kids and their pig grazing on the grass.








Notice the fedora style hat common in this region





Cusco is a decent sized city. It's in a bowl and lies at 11,000 feet altitude.





Encountered this on my way down the hill.






It would be great for a picture naming contest.

Like: "Back, back, back . . . oh shit!"
Or: "OK, if I sneak up here, I can get ahead of all those taxis."
Or, of course if in North America: "Here, hold my beer and watch this . . ."


Arrived at Kukuli Lodge in Cusco and got settled in for a couple of days before Machu Pichu

__________________
www.rexbuck.com - RexBuck's Latin America
Information on travelling in Latin America.
Includes links to ride reports to Mexico and to South America
RexBuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 02:46 PM   #345
Saralou
Worldwide Rider
 
Saralou's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: July 22, 2012 start RTW from Vancouver, B.C.
Oddometer: 679
Hello fellow Canadian

I am really enjoying your RR. As we are in Costa Rica am back there in the post and trying nor to read too far ahead. We are formally from Port Moody and now from Pritchard. Good luck.


Sara
__________________
www.worldwideride.ca

ADV RR Finding Freedom...World Wide Ride

Join the Adventure
Saralou is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014