ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Battle scooters
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-01-2012, 10:33 PM   #31
InlineSkate
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Location: Bay City, MI
Oddometer: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnone View Post
"If someone had the desire and multiple six figures to invest, there are easier and less risky ways to make money. "
Warney,
Please name some of these easier and less risky ways.
I bet we can shoot holes in them too.
Thanks
Most established franchises or highly rated mutual fund would be a safer bet. If we want to be picky. How often do you see a Subway or McDonalds go under? :P

But honestly he should follow his dreams, but lets not kid ourselves by saying it will be easy. Start ups with little foundation are the riskiest financial bets out there.
InlineSkate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2012, 05:01 AM   #32
KennyT OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Naperville
Oddometer: 75
Hi Dandy Doug, Inline Skate, 2 Wheel Dude, and Barone. Thanks!
I continue to pursue this project. Why not? I am a real estate agent...
Worst case, there is none. Mid level case, maybe I sell that building...
Best case, I put together some partners to buy the building, fix it up, open a scooter store, and make Naperville a more beautiful place!
Thanks again everyone!
Ken
__________________
2009 Kymco Agility 125
Have fun and enjoy the ride!
KennyT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2012, 05:04 AM   #33
KennyT OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Naperville
Oddometer: 75
A follow up post to the Naperville Scooter Store...

If you live in or around Naperville, Illinois, you have probably noticed the building located at 420-436 Washington Street, just steps from the center of Downtown Naperville...

-The front view of 420 Washington Avenue...

My first reaction upon seeing the building was, "What the heck is that thing doing here?"
The building has been vacant for several years, and it shows. Weeds overwhelm the building...
Many of the windows are boarded up, and garbage is accumulating...

-This north side of the property shows the poor condition...

The property needs work, inside and out...

-This picture was taken through a front window...
Despite the condition of the property, a thought keeps coming back to me...
"What an incredible location!"
The property is located on Washington Avenue, just steps from central downtown...

-Cars pass 420 Washington Avenue day and night...
It is located alongside the West Branch of the DuPage River...

-This bridge over the DuPage River as seen from the parking lot...
With water on two sides...

-This view of the property was taken from across the river...
North Central College is located directly behind the property...

-The bleachers of North Central's Wehrli Stadium can be seen from this view...
The parking lot is adequately sized...

-The parking lot on the property from the back of the building...

And what business wouldn't want the exposure this location would bring?

-The building is located at one of Naperville's busiest intersections...

This property is for sale, listed as a short sale. It is currently zoned as a three story building, with a space for a restaurant on the first floor and office/condo space above...
I have several business ideas for the property, but am open to any and all ideas to put this potentially great property to good use.
I have made preliminary inquiries with a builder regarding costs of construction, I have spoken with mortgage brokers about financing, and I contacted a member of Naperville's city council inquiring about potential zoning issues.
As a Naperville Realtor working in the city since 2005, I have experience listing, selling and closing Naperville short sales. Before becoming a real estate agent, I was involved in the financial services industry for over 15 years...
I am excited about this opportunity to help the city of Naperville. The people are tired of looking at the building, and the property is a blight on the downtown...
I am also excited about the financial opportunity that exists. Location, location, location...
I will need help.
If you are interested in discussing this property or it's potential further, please call me anytime at 630-697-0536 or email me at Ken@KensFeaturedHomes.com.
I would love to hear your ideas...
Ken

Read these related articles:
"Chasing a Dream: The Naperville Scooter Store"
"Building Memories: 420-436 Washington St."

__________________
2009 Kymco Agility 125
Have fun and enjoy the ride!
KennyT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2012, 07:11 AM   #34
DandyDoug
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Lewisville, NC
Oddometer: 378
Location looks prime for the use you have in mind.
Zoning should not be too difficult to accomplish in the current market if anyone at city hall is awake
Sounds like you have the right street cred with your backround.
If the build out costs are not too bad and the mortgage does not eat you alive, you might have a fighting chance.
I am always leary of outside investors , they have only one agenda and it's not usually in your best interest.

Depending on how much space you would really need for a scooter store, you might be wise to sublet part of the property if you can get a tenant that compliments your intended use.
DandyDoug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 05:52 AM   #35
klaviator
Beastly Adventurer
 
klaviator's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Huntsville, AL
Oddometer: 5,494
I have been a motorcycle fanatic for over 30 years and into scooters for two. I have lived in ten different states and have had the chance to check out and/or do business at hundreds of motorcycle/scooter dealers. The BEST dealer I have seen during that time is the dealer I bought my Aprilia scooter from, Rider's Hill/European Motorsports in Dahlonega, GA.

Here's their website: http://www.ridershill.com/

During this recent recession they have grown 20% per year, they have added more employees and a third building to the two they had. They sell Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, MV Augusta and all brands of used motorcycles and scooters.

Here's a typical day there:



Why are they so succesfull at a time when other dealers have been struggling?

First, they had not intended to be a new motorcycle dealer. They built their business in a location that riders often come by, and made it a place the they would want to stop at. There is a cafe inside, rocking chairs on the porch, and a tire shop with a large selection of tires at discounted prices.

What often happens is that riders stop by to get a bite or meet friends, they stroll around looking at the new bikes, start drooling and before they know it they ride out on a new bike.

I would recommend using this dealer as a model.
__________________
I ride, Therefore I Am.



klaviator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 09:33 PM   #36
KennyT OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Naperville
Oddometer: 75
Hi Klaviator and Dandy. Thanks!
Dandy, I too am skeptical of outside investors. I also don't want to suck up to anyone for money, however, they would be a necessary evil if I went after that building. I don't have 300K for a downpayment on the property!
Klaviator, that looks like bike heaven! Sounds awesom...
Thanks again!
Ken
__________________
2009 Kymco Agility 125
Have fun and enjoy the ride!
KennyT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 10:13 PM   #37
JerryH
Vintage Rider
 
JerryH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Chandler, AZ
Oddometer: 4,541
Quote:
Originally Posted by InlineSkate View Post
Most established franchises or highly rated mutual fund would be a safer bet. If we want to be picky. How often do you see a Subway or McDonalds go under? :P

But honestly he should follow his dreams, but lets not kid ourselves by saying it will be easy. Start ups with little foundation are the riskiest financial bets out there.

True, but running a fast food joint would not be any fun at all. I can't imagine myself doing something like that. I also would not want to run a Japanese "powersports" emporium. Stuff like this is strictly business, you might as well work for someone else. But a small scooter shop would be a blast. Scooters are cool, and scooter people are generally a lot friendlier and nicer than motorcycle/ATV people.

I am a fleet services mechanic for a city government, which means I work on everything, from large construction equipment and trucks to weed whackers, but mostly cars and pickups. I have been there for 35 years. I am 53 years old, and a few years ago I was "promoted" to working mostly on auto electronics, something I absolutely hate. I'm a mechanic, not an electronics technician. (well, actually I guess I am now, I have a piece of paper that says so) but it is not what I want. I don't believe motor vehicles should even have electronics.

I am having some health issues, I am sick of my job (I'd rather do oil changes all day than mess with that garbage), I have made some lucky financial decisions, and I plan to retire from my job at age 55.

My main hobby, besides motorcycles, is vintage cars. I am old enough to remember when cars DIDN'T have electronics. I own 2 vintage cars, a '72 Pinto woodgrain wagon, and a '64 Fairlane convertible. I have been working on other peoples vintage cars for many years on the side. Most shops these days won't touch a vintage car, and those that specialize in them charge a fortune. I do good work at a fair price. I don't make that much money doing it, but it is fun. So I already have a reputation in the local vintage car scene, I have plenty of tools. I do not have a shop, I have to take my truck and tools to the customer. I cannot afford to get a shop. But I get tons of calls from people wanting things fixed right now that I don't have time to do. I am seriously considering doing it full time for awhile when I retire. I know old cars, and I have a house full of parts catalogs and a LONG list of vintage parts suppliers for all American vintage cars. I have never worked on European cars besides air cooled VWs and Porsches. I wouldn't touch an Asian car. Not my thing.

One neat thing about this is not having to invest much money into it, I already have what I need to do on site work, and a long list of contacts in the vintage car business. If the customer want's something I can't do, chances are I will know where to send them.

To me, if a business isn't fun, it just isn't worth it. I would have enough retirement to support me, this would just be to make extra money, and for once in my life, do something I enjoy.
__________________
2002 Vulcan 750 (now being slowly reassembled) 2013 Royal Enfield B5
2001 XT225, 2009 Genuine Stella
2012 Zuma 125, 1980 Puch moped
JerryH is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 07:54 AM   #38
Bronco638
Nobody Home
 
Bronco638's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: Itasca, IL
Oddometer: 3,501
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH
I own 2 vintage cars, a '72 Pinto woodgrain wagon, and a '64 Fairlane convertible.
Right On Jerry!!

Would your property be big enough for a pole barn or large shed? You could run your "business" out of that building and cherry-pick the projects on which you would like to work. Either that, of get yourself a used (but not abused) 1 ton pickup with a utility body (to hold all your tools). Then, you can go to the customer (if that's your preference).

/ highjack over
__________________
There are some simple thruths......and dogs know what they are - Joseph Duemer

Andy holds the lead. And he will, all the way to the Highway. Today is his day.
Bronco638 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 11:45 AM   #39
ScootTour
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Oddometer: 1,491
KennyT,

When it comes to scooters, and I bet this is true for motorcycles, your best advertiser will be your customer at a level unlike any other product. Its extreemly common for people to stop and ask me about scooters when I am riding around town and many scooter riders (like motorcycle riders) like to involve themselves in community, rallies etc (on the other hand to be fair some people buy scooters and it never leaves the garage). Never the less, I feel unlike other retail businesses, scooters and motorcycles shops can benifit more from great community involvement and diplomacy on the side of the shop owner. I know it can be a balance between getting to involved and increasing risk from toxic personalities vs. being to uninvolved but I am willing bet in your current proffesion you understand the value of these skills.

Oh and personally? A clean shinny show room and clean garage matters to me (and I assume many others), Austin is a great example of a city with some great scooter dealers.
ScootTour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 11:54 AM   #40
ScootTour
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Oddometer: 1,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by klaviator View Post
I
Here's their website: http://www.ridershill.com/

.
speaking from personal past experiences I would gladly do a multi-state drive to buy a scooter from a good store. The scooter industry is so small in the US I want to support the strong dealers as much as I can.
ScootTour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 12:50 PM   #41
SilkMoneyLove
Beastly Adventurer
 
SilkMoneyLove's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Oddometer: 1,805
My thoughts on the buildings

Personally, I think your idea is good, BUT (isn't there always a BUT?) I think the buildings are too big with parking lots too small. I would suggest starting small and working your way up to the bigger size. All you need is a little store front with a rollup door in the back for a service entrance. The other thing you need is a BIG parking lot. People like to practice riding. They do that right away. If you have a little parking lot, people won't get practice and then they enter the road and tip over (seen it plenty of times in shops with small lots, usually opening to a major road). Not a good first time experience.

Another thing that comes to mind is why buy the building? Lease a business space and see how it goes. This leaves more capital for your actual business, which is selling and servicing scooters. The buildings you are looking at have been down for years. They will take full commitment to get up and running and then if you need to sell and move you are stuck with a building.

Talk to a tax pro as well because leasing may actually give you some different tax advantages.
SilkMoneyLove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 08:15 PM   #42
vtwin
Air cooled runnin' mon
 
vtwin's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: NorCal
Oddometer: 7,044
You should have a little cafe in there to draw a crowd. Not too fancy, coffee and such. Gives scooterist a reason to hang out and invite friends for coffee and show them scoots. Maybe the coffee goers will get interested in scooters too. When the weather gets bad, the coffee house will still draw a crowd and provide income during the winter months. In SoCal, they have a car show called Coffee and Cars once a month, what better combination?
__________________
"Alles hat ein Ende--nur die Wurst, sie hat zwei"
Monroe.

"You only have too much fuel if you're on fire"
unknown
vtwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2012, 09:53 AM   #43
Bronco638
Nobody Home
 
Bronco638's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: Itasca, IL
Oddometer: 3,501
The parking lot is a pretty good size and you can ride around the backside of the building. Coffee is a good idea but there is a Burger King next door.

The down side of a lease is that you may get locked in for longer than the business survives. However, ownership, in the same case, may be worse.
__________________
There are some simple thruths......and dogs know what they are - Joseph Duemer

Andy holds the lead. And he will, all the way to the Highway. Today is his day.
Bronco638 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2012, 11:28 AM   #44
Barnone
Beastly Adventurer
 
Barnone's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: WNC SWFL
Oddometer: 3,746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warney View Post
Gee Vince, this is a Scooter board but you might consider some Berkshire Hathaway A shares, Microsoft, Apple, maybe GE stock? Fire away!
Warney,
Oh, I though your were talking about creating a new business not just investing in the stock market. I assumed you would mention something original. My bad.
__________________
Vince @ SWFL or WNC
2001 Kawasaki W650
2012 Dong Fang DF250RTB
Barnone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2012, 06:41 PM   #45
vtwin
Air cooled runnin' mon
 
vtwin's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: NorCal
Oddometer: 7,044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronco638 View Post
The parking lot is a pretty good size and you can ride around the backside of the building. Coffee is a good idea but there is a Burger King next door.

The down side of a lease is that you may get locked in for longer than the business survives. However, ownership, in the same case, may be worse.

I'm thinking a little higher end coffee. Maybe even provide wi-fi so some students can hang out and get scooters on their minds. Clear out the brush so there's a nice view of the river. Some picnic tables out that way as well so once in awhile they could host a b-b-q. Could be named "Scooter Cafe" Host rides and club meetings. Tech days for new owners. Scooter ride event every 4th sunday like they have in Orange County, CA they call it Super Sunday, tons of people with mostly Ruckus have rides.
__________________
"Alles hat ein Ende--nur die Wurst, sie hat zwei"
Monroe.

"You only have too much fuel if you're on fire"
unknown
vtwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 06:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014