ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-22-2013, 08:03 PM   #1501
ONandOFF
-ROAD-
 
ONandOFF's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Shenandoah Valley riding wonderland
Oddometer: 5,535
I'm not going to say no. I've never tried one. But I'm skeptical. I need something I can handle. Fine, I'll see if I can try one. They're a bit big and flashy for my style, but if they work well, I could maybe deal with a toned-down one. It's true, when carrying a second person you do have to carry a bit more stuff also.
__________________
Let's ride!!! - No offense, but there've been a lot of people over time who were just as sure, yet got it wrong. - Una necedad, aunque la repitan millones de bocas, no deja de ser una necedad. - "you know that I could have me a million more friends and all I'd have to lose is my point of view" (Prine)
ONandOFF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2013, 08:17 PM   #1502
WhicheverAnyWayCan
Deaf Biker
 
WhicheverAnyWayCan's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Location: Seven Springs NC
Oddometer: 833
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatogato View Post
Well, I figured that I would try and talk some sense into you! If you take that Sportster down there, there are going to be countless opportunities that you will miss out on. No ruta 40, no Coyhaique for you if you take the Harley. Every dirt road is going to annoy the crap out of you instead of excite you like it would on a KLR.

Another, annoying side effect of taking the Harley is Latin American thieves will be way more interested in it than they would a KLR. Every motorcyclist in Latin America wishes he rode a Harley. I really wanted to go to Venezuela, but was too afraid because I had a BMW F650 and that is what the cops rider there, so it is a very desirable bike to steal.

Finding parts for your Harley will be impossible down there. KLR 650 parts can be found in a few places down there.
Ulyses, see what I am saying! I still got people trying to talk sense into me

gatogato, I appreciate the concern but I am certain I got most everything covered. Did you know that there is harley plant in S. America too? One in Brazil and yes each country except Peru has a harley dealer so I will be ok. Also, I have rid of all unnecessary clustered weight and make it lighter. Replacing harley rims with Excel dirt bike rim and HD cafe racing rim to help drop 20lbs. KTM front end with Applied Racing triple tree see 20lbs lighter over HD front end. Currently working on handlebar and HD controls trying to lose more weight. Gonna build a large fuel tank about 5-6 gallons and 2-3 gallons aux fuel tank. By the time I am done with my sporty, it should be just 40-50lbs heavier than the KLR650 and a lot of fun to ride on!

Ok let's not get into HD debate and carry on with Ulyses' riding report

WhicheverAnyWayCan screwed with this post 03-23-2013 at 07:46 AM
WhicheverAnyWayCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 10:21 AM   #1503
crashmaster
ow, my balls!
 
crashmaster's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Alaska
Oddometer: 5,205
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatogato View Post
Well, I figured that I would try and talk some sense into you! If you take that Sportster down there, there are going to be countless opportunities that you will miss out on. No ruta 40, no Coyhaique for you if you take the Harley. Every dirt road is going to annoy the crap out of you instead of excite you like it would on a KLR.

Another, annoying side effect of taking the Harley is Latin American thieves will be way more interested in it than they would a KLR. Every motorcyclist in Latin America wishes he rode a Harley. I really wanted to go to Venezuela, but was too afraid because I had a BMW F650 and that is what the cops rider there, so it is a very desirable bike to steal.

Finding parts for your Harley will be impossible down there. KLR 650 parts can be found in a few places down there.
Yeah, no freaking way a Harley can go to South America, cant be done. Cant go off road, it will get stolen, and you cant get parts at all. So you were too afraid to go to VZ because you thought your bike was desirable to steal? In VZ, every bike is desirable to steal.














Sport bikes cant be ridden there either.



Ride what you have and just go, its not that complicated.
__________________
Riding the Americas: No Fumar Español
_____________________________________________


crashmaster screwed with this post 03-23-2013 at 10:45 AM
crashmaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2013, 09:12 AM   #1504
gatogato
Studly Adventurer
 
gatogato's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: Des Moines, IA
Oddometer: 774
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhicheverAnyWayCan View Post
Ulyses, see what I am saying! I still got people trying to talk sense into me

gatogato, I appreciate the concern but I am certain I got most everything covered. Did you know that there is harley plant in S. America too? One in Brazil and yes each country except Peru has a harley dealer so I will be ok. Also, I have rid of all unnecessary clustered weight and make it lighter. Replacing harley rims with Excel dirt bike rim and HD cafe racing rim to help drop 20lbs. KTM front end with Applied Racing triple tree see 20lbs lighter over HD front end. Currently working on handlebar and HD controls trying to lose more weight. Gonna build a large fuel tank about 5-6 gallons and 2-3 gallons aux fuel tank. By the time I am done with my sporty, it should be just 40-50lbs heavier than the KLR650 and a lot of fun to ride on!

Ok let's not get into HD debate and carry on with Ulyses' riding report

Okay, well props to everyone who has done it on a Harley. I do not want to be the guy that looks like he is judging other people's ride reports. WAWC, it looks like you are fairly mechanical, so I am sure you will be okay.

As long as you have enough ground clearance to get over all of the topes you should be okay. When I was in Medellin there was a guy from the U.S. getting his brand new Goldwing fixed after he bottomed out on one of the topes and put a whole in his oil pan.
__________________
Motorcycle Accessories Business:
www.journeyrider.com
Central and South America (09/07-05/08)!
http://www.journeyrider.net
gatogato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2013, 09:41 PM   #1505
Mossy-Back
Wet-Sider
 
Mossy-Back's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Location: Corvallis, OR
Oddometer: 1,553
I recently watched a video of a guy who did a RTW ride on an R1. Got stuck in sand and mud a few times, but he kept on going.
__________________
Evan
2013 Husqvarna Strada
'93 XR650L (Gone, but missed)
Ooh-Rah! Once a Marine, always a Marine!
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenny61 View Post
figures...my stud was rusty I played with my nuts a little and it cranked right over
Mossy-Back is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 06:18 AM   #1506
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Oddometer: 966
Las Grutas to Coronel Pringles

Day 158 (March 23, 2013)
Las Grutas, Argentina to Coronel Pringles, Argentina
Day's Ride: 352 Miles


View Larger Map

After packing up and getting everything loaded, I tried to find the caretaker for the campground that I had crashed at in order to pay him. I spent about 15 minutes wandering around the grounds looking for him, but was ultimately unsuccessful. Eventually, I ended up just having to leave without paying. Looks like another night of free camping!

The road was more of nothing:



There was really nothing to see. The roads were incredibly long, straight, and flat. I ended up breaking the day up into 100 mile chunks and stopping at gas stations to rest and refuel.



With my debit card number having been stolen the day before, I was now forced to call the bank everytime that I wanted to use the card. Luckily, nearly every gas station has wifi and I was able to use some skype credit to make cheap international calls.

I passed throughout the town of Bahia Blanca. After having been in Patagonia for so long, It was a little strange passing through a city with multi story buildings.



It was also a little strange to see a Wal-Mart alongside the road:



Leaving Bahia Blanca I soon began to enter into a more agrarian setting. Lots of cattle pastures and crops. There was even a John Deere dealer. I felt like I was back home!



I made it to the small farming town of Coronel Pringles and pulled over to see if I could find a place to camp. Luckily, it seems that nearly every town in Argentina has a municipal campground where you can camp for free or at least a very modest price. A local cop soon directed me to the town park where they had a small spot for tents.

As I pulled up, a few Argentinos walked up to me and began asking me questions about me trip. They were really amazed that I had decided to visit their small town and wanted to know why I had stopped there. I just told them the truth: it was about a day's ride from where I had started in Las Grutas.

I eventually set up camp, went for a little run, and then started cooking. While I was cooking, I investigated one of the cracks that I had seen forming on my luggage rack. It appeared that the crack had widened and had also broken through one of the gussets that I had had welded onto the outside.



Luckily, there was a second gusset on the inside of the rack that was keeping it from breaking off completely. I debated with myself on whether I should try and ride it all the way into BA in the morning as it was, or try and reinforce it. After a few glasses of wine, I decided I would figure it out in the morning.
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 06:30 AM   #1507
Vstrom650e
Banned
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Oddometer: 101
This is a great read.
Vstrom650e is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 06:31 AM   #1508
ONandOFF
-ROAD-
 
ONandOFF's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Shenandoah Valley riding wonderland
Oddometer: 5,535
Probably ought to tack or clamp that break just in case.
Did you leave something for the caretaker at the campground for letting you stay there?
Que pase buenos dias. :-)
__________________
Let's ride!!! - No offense, but there've been a lot of people over time who were just as sure, yet got it wrong. - Una necedad, aunque la repitan millones de bocas, no deja de ser una necedad. - "you know that I could have me a million more friends and all I'd have to lose is my point of view" (Prine)
ONandOFF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 06:37 AM   #1509
achesley
Old Motorcyclist
 
achesley's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2003
Location: Jennings, Louisiana
Oddometer: 3,425
Still lovin' your report and want to say " Thank You " again for sharing your journey.
__________________

A '00 KLR 650 39,000 miles, A '07 1250S 77,000 actual, A '03 5.3L Chevy Truck 76,000 + '43 style dude , Simper Fi ;-)
achesley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 07:32 AM   #1510
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Oddometer: 966
Nebraska, Argentina

Day 159 (March 24, 2013)
Coronel Pringles, Argentina to Buenos Aires, Argentina
Day's Ride: 320 Miles


View Larger Map

After some debate on what I should do concerning the crack in my luggage rack, I decided to reinforce in order to make sure it didn't crack off while I was riding and become more difficult to fix:



Which leads me to one of my deep thoughts concerning adventure motorcycle travel:

Q: What are the most important spare parts to bring on a 20,000 mile motorcycle trip through Central and South America?

A: Bailing wire, zip ties, and duct tape.


I actually found the bailing wire pictured above laying on the ground in front of the shop in Bolivia where I had my rack re-welded the last time. I'm glad I saved it.

The road north continued through acres and acres of agricultural land. It felt like I was back in Eastern Oregon where I grew up.



Actually, after a while, it felt like I was in Nebraska or some other Midwestern agricultural state. Maybe Iowa. It was crazy. Just tons and tons of farms and ranches. Now I see why Argentina is known for it's beef.

The ride was fairly boring again. Just long straight roads with tons of farming and not much to see. With only about 20 pesos ($5) left in my pocket, I was forced to continue using gas station internet to call my bank and authorize my card to make transactions for gas and food. Thank god this didn't happen somewhere like Bolivia. I would have been dead in the water.

I'm still somewhat of a celebrity whenever I stop. People see the big bike with the strange license plate, the list of countries on the wind screen, and the gypsy wagon load of things hanging off of it and immediately want to know what you are doing and where you are from. As soon as you tell them that you are from the states and that you rode all the way down, their eyes go big and they say things like: "Increible!" or "No!" or "En serio?!".

I snapped a picture of some Argentinas posing in front of my bike. A picture of a picture. I don't think that they knew that the owner of the bike was sitting just inside the gas station



As I neared the outskirts of Buenos Aires, I began to see tons of cars pulled off on the side of the freeway. After a while, I began to realize that there were tons of Argentinos just hanging out on the grass next to the road, having picnics and BBQs. The closer that I got to the city, the more people that I began to see. A lot of them had brought small quads and dirtbikes and the kids were riding around like hooligans right next to the freeway. I guess it's quite common here on Sunday night to go hang out on the grass next to the autopista and have a party.



After literally spending my last few pesos at toll booths, I finally made it to downtown BA and rode straight into absolute chaos.

For some reason, tons of kids and young adults where blocking the streets, banging drums, waving flags, starting fires, throwing trash, and protesting. There were also tons of busses parked all over the place, blocking traffic and generally adding to the mayhem. WTF?

I had no idea what the protest was about, but the cops didn't seem too perturbed, almost like it was something that happened every day. I'm all about the right to free assembly, but damn, it's hard enough navigating a large Latin American city at night on a motorcycle. Add a bunch of angry protesters to the mix and it becomes nearly impossible. It took my about 45 minutes to move a mile. I had to stop a few times and shut my bike off to keep it from overheating.

I eventually found a hostel that bubbletron had told me about, unloaded all of my gear, and took my bike to a parking garage down the street. After making sure it was parked in the light, locking the handlebars, putting on the disc alarm, and chaining it to a steel railing, I figured that it was secure enough for the night and went back to the hostel to crash.

Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 07:41 AM   #1511
bcs
Adventurer
 
bcs's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: SoCal
Oddometer: 71
Yikes, posts like that last one make me nervous, especially after reading about Noah;s experience in Dublin.
bcs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 07:47 AM   #1512
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Oddometer: 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by ONandOFF View Post
Did you leave something for the caretaker at the campground for letting you stay there?
Que pase buenos dias. :-)
I was going to, but I only had like 50 Pesos left in "efectivo" and didn't really have anyway of getting more until I hit BA. And it's a good thing I held onto those pesos because by the time I made it in, I think I had about 2 pesos to my name. I bought him some beer the night before, so I hope that sufficed.
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 07:49 AM   #1513
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Oddometer: 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by achesley View Post
Still lovin' your report and want to say " Thank You " again for sharing your journey.
Thanks for reading along! And semper fi tambien!
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 07:50 AM   #1514
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Oddometer: 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcs View Post
Yikes, posts like that last one make me nervous, especially after reading about Noah;s experience in Dublin.
The protestors or the risk of theft? The protest seemed pretty non-violent. The risk of theft on the other hand....well, I'll have to go see if my bike is still there in a minute.
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 07:51 AM   #1515
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Oddometer: 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vstrom650e View Post
This is a great read.
Thanks!
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 12:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014