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Old 11-08-2012, 11:03 AM   #16
JimVonBaden
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Originally Posted by MrBob View Post
If Tim Burton owned a body shop.


Once painted it looked OK. The back of the headlight isn't visable from the outside of the bike, so no harm. It has held well for 10K miles and over 2 years, nearly three. Saved me $800.

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Old 11-10-2012, 12:39 AM   #17
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After I got knocked off by a car on my '99 Connie both bags were split on the backside, far worse than yours.
I 'welded' the cracks with a soldering iron. Started at the end of the split and worked backwards, drawing the iron back about 3-4 mm them pushing back about half as far to raise a small ridge and repeating hte process along the entire split without taking the iron away. Far easier to do than to explain. And best of all, its a free repair.
The bags held up fine, including the around the one almost torn off mounting tab, for about 3 months of daily use before the other guys insurance finally decided to total it.
I believe in my parts box I have one of the air deflectors that I repaired in the same way. Will try and remember to take a pic tomorrow and post up
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Old 11-10-2012, 06:54 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post


Once painted it looked OK. The back of the headlight isn't visable from the outside of the bike, so no harm. It has held well for 10K miles and over 2 years, nearly three. Saved me $800.

Jim
Saved me $800.

That's what it's about
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Old 11-12-2012, 04:00 AM   #19
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Saved me $800.

That's what it's about
$800 puts a lot of miles between you and where you live, its not a bad reason at all to take the Frankenstein approach.
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:44 AM   #20
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This appeared after my last trip.


The pros tell me that the plastic is some kind of bastardized mix of polypropylene and whatever and that welding is the only fix that might work.
One of my soldering irons should do the trick and I'm hoping to find a chunk of the original luggage to use as filler.
There's a lesson to be learned here when buying the factory luggage; can it be repaired?
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Old 11-12-2012, 11:13 AM   #21
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The pros tell me that the plastic is some kind of bastardized mix of polypropylene and whatever and that welding is the only fix that might work.
One of my soldering irons should do the trick and I'm hoping to find a chunk of the original luggage to use as filler.
There's a lesson to be learned here when buying the factory luggage; can it be repaired?
The salesdrone at the dealer won't know. He may say yes, if he does, probe for the type and grade of plastic so you can get some welding rod and a heat gun. The National Office probably won't know, but they could get you in touch with the designer/engineer that sepc'd the plastic - they'd definitely know.

Except then they wouldn't be able to sell you another $600 case to replace the one you broke.


But all that aside, if you're going to try and repair it, don't use a soldering iron; it isn't the right tool for the job. Plastic welding is done with a high temperature hot air gun equipped with a fine nozzle and a rod of filler material of the same type you're trying to weld. Go to McMaster-carr and search through their plastics selection until you find one that matches what you've got, thats your best bet.

Good luck.
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Old 11-12-2012, 11:31 AM   #22
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The salesdrone at the dealer won't know. He may say yes, if he does, probe for the type and grade of plastic so you can get some welding rod and a heat gun. The National Office probably won't know, but they could get you in touch with the designer/engineer that sepc'd the plastic - they'd definitely know.

Except then they wouldn't be able to sell you another $600 case to replace the one you broke.


But all that aside, if you're going to try and repair it, don't use a soldering iron; it isn't the right tool for the job. Plastic welding is done with a high temperature hot air gun equipped with a fine nozzle and a rod of filler material of the same type you're trying to weld. Go to McMaster-carr and search through their plastics selection until you find one that matches what you've got, thats your best bet.

Good luck.
The guy who ID'd the plastic was a repair technician at a local plastic wholesaler. He wasn't interested in selling me anything. It never occurred to me to involve the dealership in this process. I knew that aggravation would be the result.
I hear what you're saying about the hot air welder but I'm not planning to put any more money into this little adventure. There is a used bag on the Connie member forum for 75.00, as a last resort.
The ultrasonic welding process remains intriguing but I couldn't find anyone in the area who does it.
I just wanted to see where this quest would take me and hoped to come out the other side of it knowing more than when I began.
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Old 11-12-2012, 11:47 AM   #23
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The guy who ID'd the plastic was a repair technician at a local plastic wholesaler. He wasn't interested in selling me anything. It never occurred to me to involve the dealership in this process. I knew that aggravation would be the result.
I hear what you're saying about the hot air welder but I'm not planning to put any more money into this little adventure. There is a used bag on the Connie member forum for 75.00, as a last resort.
The ultrasonic welding process remains intriguing but I couldn't find anyone in the area who does it.
I just wanted to see where this quest would take me and hoped to come out the other side of it knowing more than when I began.
Of course you'll know more, you asked the question "what do you think this is?" and if you got a reply, you're quids in

Ultrasonic welding is very, very good and would fix the crack. Trouble is, you're going to spend more than the entire bike is worth on fixturing to make a repair worth your time. Its a great process for manufacturing, not so great for repair.

The hot air gun is handy elsewhere - use it for heat shrink tubing, solder splices in wiring (think crimped connection, but soldered and sealed in one shot with hot air) and heating metal to break bolts free. It really is a useful tool, an adequate one can be bought from Harbor Freight, a quite good one is available at McMaster-Carr.
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Old 11-12-2012, 12:04 PM   #24
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[QUOTE=Twilight Error;20027867

The hot air gun is handy elsewhere - use it for heat shrink tubing, solder splices in wiring (think crimped connection, but soldered and sealed in one shot with hot air) and heating metal to break bolts free. It really is a useful tool, an adequate one can be bought from Harbor Freight, a quite good one is available at McMaster-Carr.[/QUOTE]

A heat gun has been on my list for some time but money is ridiculously short right now so I've been checking Craig's List and local second hand stores for a good used unit. Eventually, something will pop up. I agree that it would be much better than a soldering iron for the repair and for sure better than using a match on heat shrink.
Reading the Harbor Freight reviews of their cheapest heat guns is hilarious: "First I heard a pop and then sparks stared shooting out of the tool".
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Old 11-12-2012, 12:49 PM   #25
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A heat gun has been on my list for some time but money is ridiculously short right now so I've been checking Craig's List and local second hand stores for a good used unit. Eventually, something will pop up. I agree that it would be much better than a soldering iron for the repair and for sure better than using a match on heat shrink.
Reading the Harbor Freight reviews of their cheapest heat guns is hilarious: "First I heard a pop and then sparks stared shooting out of the tool".
Yeah, Harbor Freight can be hit or miss. The stuff without moving parts or a need for precision seems to be okay.
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Old 11-12-2012, 05:39 PM   #26
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Why not fiberglass it? Maybe I'm looking at the picture wrong, but I would stop-drill the crack and then use a small strip of fiberglass and epoxy on the inside. With good surface prep, it should adhere just fine.
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Old 11-12-2012, 06:04 PM   #27
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Why not fiberglass it? Maybe I'm looking at the picture wrong, but I would stop-drill the crack and then use a small strip of fiberglass and epoxy on the inside. With good surface prep, it should adhere just fine.

From my post in the Concours Owners Group forum:
I stopped at Home Depot and picked up an epoxy billed as a plastic welder. After carefully preparing the crack with grinding and an acetone wipe I laid down a nice bead of epoxy and let it set up for a few hours. It took almost no effort to peel if off.
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Old 11-13-2012, 05:57 AM   #28
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I often use a elec soldering gun with the "paddle tip" to weld plastics. A water spray btl at hand helps to set the welded areas as you work. Clamping is essential to allow working when melted, then set-up/hardening. It's possible to make very strong and esthetically decent repairs this way & for me often exceeds what a plastic welder offers to the job. I've saved some very pricey parts this way.Working from both sides can help & also having some scraps of the same thermoplastic material as a "filler rod" can help. I built wrecks & always saved scraps of the various plastics to use as fillers. A trip to a AB shop will get you some scraps to use as such. The AP store plastic epoxies work at times but a pricey solution.
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Old 11-13-2012, 10:10 AM   #29
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I often use a elec soldering gun with the "paddle tip" to weld plastics. A water spray btl at hand helps to set the welded areas as you work. Clamping is essential to allow working when melted, then set-up/hardening. It's possible to make very strong and esthetically decent repairs this way & for me often exceeds what a plastic welder offers to the job. I've saved some very pricey parts this way.Working from both sides can help & also having some scraps of the same thermoplastic material as a "filler rod" can help. I built wrecks & always saved scraps of the various plastics to use as fillers. A trip to a AB shop will get you some scraps to use as such. The AP store plastic epoxies work at times but a pricey solution.
I'm hoping another Connie owner can come up with a scrap of broken luggage I can use for filler.
I like the paddle tip and I'm also looking for a used heat gun because I want to have on anyway.
Learning how to make this repair has been a good learning experience for me.
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Old 11-14-2012, 05:24 AM   #30
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Look for the plastic symbol type on the luggage then find the same plastic to use for repair-doesn't have to be the same item, just same plastic. Take a look at some other plastic items and see what they are made of or google the symbols.
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