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Old 11-07-2012, 07:32 AM   #1
vector_dumb OP
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Alps Mountaineering Mystique tents on sale

FYI Cabela's looks to be having a closeout on Alps Mountaineering Mystique tents. Both the 1.5 and 2.0 are running half off:
2.0 size is $110
http://www.cabelas.com/view-all-tent...2-tent-1.shtml
1.5 size is $95
http://www.cabelas.com/view-all-tent...5-tent-1.shtml

(If you order from Cabela's you can use the promo code 2turkey for free shipping on orders over 99 bucks.)

It's not the lightest or the smallest tent but it aint too bad. It looks to be a good compromise of weight, size, and money. While there weren't many reviews of the tent at Cabela's, the reviews on Amazon looked good: http://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaine.../dp/B003AW61X0

A number of the reviews were from adventure riders, so I'm sure someone on here can give feedback. I'm not sure it will matter, but I think the steeper sides will make the interior space a bit more usable.

I ended up ordering a 2.0 for myself, but I probably would have been fine w/ the 1.5,. I'm cutting the bike some slack with my whopping 165 lbs, so extra pound for a larger tent is O.K.

I'm not associated w/ Cabela's or the tent manufacturer. I just thought this looked like a good deal so I'll pass it along!
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Old 11-07-2012, 07:46 AM   #2
_cy_
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Alps makes high quality low costs tents. they go on sale all the time for that price range.

would not recommend this tent mostly because it's not free standing. I've got a two pole free standing Alps tent that's super light ... under 4lb packed weight with extra stakes and ground cloth. actual tent is 3.5lb

got it on sale about 5 years ago for $80 if I remember right. this Alp tent is super rugged with top quality construction.
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Old 11-07-2012, 07:59 AM   #3
Canuman
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I've been using the 2.0 for a couple of years and have been pretty pleased with it. As noted, it's not free standing, but it can be set up taut to weather a lot of wind and rain. For the price, it's very good quality. I find the 2.0 an ideal size for one rider and gear. I certainly wouldn't want it any smaller. Pack size is not too bad for the comfort and space you get. If your camping is in areas that are extremely rocky or you often camp on tent platforms, it likely wouldn't be a great choice. Otherwise, it's a fine value for the dollar. I prefer the subdued colors of the Alps tents. They are a lot easier to conceal if you happen to be stealth camping, as I was in this picture from the UPAT in July.

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Old 11-07-2012, 02:43 PM   #4
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I guess I never camped with anything other than a non freestanding tent - I suppose I don't know what I'm missing! I could definitely see staking being an issue out west at times.
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:48 PM   #5
_cy_
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vector_dumb View Post
I guess I never camped with anything other than a non freestanding tent - I suppose I don't know what I'm missing! I could definitely see staking being an issue out west at times.
properly staked down above design can be very stable. but have camped at places where it's was so rocky. getting a solid stake point was flaky at best.

used a Sierra Designs Clip flashlight for years that had same layout only smaller. solution was to carry several mongol plastic stakes for critical points with plastic mallet to drive in.

if given a choice, always go with free standing, aluminum poles with external clips/sleeves. this design gives the most room and stability for amount of materials used.

North Face Flint 2 retails $169, right at 4lb... just purchased a new one for $99 shipped on flea. aluminum pole, fast clips, etc. .. as normal this two person tent is really good for one. http://www.backcountry.com/the-north...erson-3-season



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Old 11-07-2012, 05:45 PM   #6
bikerfish
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cool, thanks for the heads-up! been looking for a low-cost solo tent.
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Old 11-07-2012, 06:15 PM   #7
Canuman
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Originally Posted by bikerfish View Post
cool, thanks for the heads-up! been looking for a low-cost solo tent.
Be careful choosing so-called solo tents. They are wicked cramped in many cases, and are as expensive as a good two-person. They are fine for minimalist backpacking, but in many cases the weight difference isn't huge compared to a tandem, while the comfort level of a few extra square feet can be.

I'm really thinking of getting another classic Eureka Timberline. Damn things have been around forever. They are not featherweight, but they are mostly free-standing and are hell for stout. My last one lasted me 25 years of regular use, and then was stolen. It was still in great condition.
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Old 11-07-2012, 09:10 PM   #8
Jim K.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canuman View Post

I'm really thinking of getting another classic Eureka Timberline. Damn things have been around forever. They are not featherweight, but they are mostly free-standing and are hell for stout. My last one lasted me 25 years of regular use, and then was stolen. It was still in great condition.
+1 0n the Timberline, Mine is 22 years old. I've resealed one seam, one time, in 22 years. Lost one of the corner fittings last year. Emailed them & asked to buy another. They sent it in 3 days for free. I think I paid about $120, but I'm not sure. Seemed like a lot of money at the time. Looks pretty cheap now. Used 10 - 20 nights per year & the only wet night I ever spent was the night I found that great spot in the dry creek bed. Thunder began about 11:00. By 1:00 AM I was floating on my air mattress. The tent canopy was still dry. I've learned a little about reading topography since then.
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Old 11-07-2012, 09:34 PM   #9
_cy_
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our scout troop used Timberline tents for decades. tough as nails!
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Old 11-08-2012, 03:47 AM   #10
bikerfish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canuman View Post
Be careful choosing so-called solo tents. They are wicked cramped in many cases, and are as expensive as a good two-person. They are fine for minimalist backpacking, but in many cases the weight difference isn't huge compared to a tandem, while the comfort level of a few extra square feet can be.

I'm really thinking of getting another classic Eureka Timberline. Damn things have been around forever. They are not featherweight, but they are mostly free-standing and are hell for stout. My last one lasted me 25 years of regular use, and then was stolen. It was still in great condition.
no worries, been doing this a LONG time, solo tent for me means a 2 person. for my two-up trips we use a eureka mountain pass 3, which is one damn nice tent. I was looking to get the 2 person one for solo use, but they're kinda pricy, and I only need the tent for one or two trips a year. the alps tents are nice, I've seen them and like them. I think the guy that started the company used to work for kelty.
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:54 AM   #11
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I've used an ALPS tent for years on motorcycle trips and shorter backpacking trips where weight isn't as much of an issue. I have the Zephyr 2, which is freestanding (usually available on Amazon for about $120 or so). It's a good, well-built tent that has stood up pretty well.
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Old 11-08-2012, 07:45 AM   #12
Canuman
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Originally Posted by Jim K. View Post
+1 0n the Timberline, Mine is 22 years old. I've resealed one seam, one time, in 22 years. Lost one of the corner fittings last year. Emailed them & asked to buy another. They sent it in 3 days for free. I think I paid about $120, but I'm not sure. Seemed like a lot of money at the time. Looks pretty cheap now. Used 10 - 20 nights per year & the only wet night I ever spent was the night I found that great spot in the dry creek bed. Thunder began about 11:00. By 1:00 AM I was floating on my air mattress. The tent canopy was still dry. I've learned a little about reading topography since then.
Hah! I pitched my Timberline in what turned out to be a wind tunnel in Death Valley. Around 4 am, the winds hit 70-80 mph, which finally flattened the tent. I wasn't getting much sleep anyway. It was ok except for a bent pole, which I straightened in the field. It soldiered on without problems for many years. Only issue had was the Timberline was somewhat hot in the summer. The Alps is a better hot-weather tent, but I think the Timberline is better in colder conditions. You can use Timberlines for moderate four-season use below treeline. They are not suitable for "exteme mountaineering," but few tents below $500 are.

I have no complaints about the design, stability, or durability of the Mystique. I purchased two Eureka tents before I settled on the Alps. Both were a disappointment. I had an Apex, which had very poor weatherproofing, and a Solitare, which was so cramped I couldn't sleep in it.
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Old 11-08-2012, 03:48 PM   #13
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Hah! I pitched my Timberline in what turned out to be a wind tunnel in Death Valley. Around 4 am, the winds hit 70-80 mph, which finally flattened the tent. I wasn't getting much sleep anyway. It was ok except for a bent pole, which I straightened in the field. It soldiered on without problems for many years. Only issue had was the Timberline was somewhat hot in the summer. The Alps is a better hot-weather tent, but I think the Timberline is better in colder conditions. You can use Timberlines for moderate four-season use below treeline. They are not suitable for "exteme mountaineering," but few tents below $500 are.

I have no complaints about the design, stability, or durability of the Mystique. I purchased two Eureka tents before I settled on the Alps. Both were a disappointment. I had an Apex, which had very poor weatherproofing, and a Solitare, which was so cramped I couldn't sleep in it.
timberline tents while extremely rugged are not good in high winds. gotta disagree with your statement that most tents under $500 wouldn't be good under extreme conditions.

for instance the very affordable two man north face tent post above is extremely stable. I've camped out in 95+ mph winds in an Alp tent with almost identical design that I paid about $85. that Alps tent survived two separate Philmont trips and umpteen campouts and is still going strong. the brand new North Face just sits, while the Alps tent is what gets used. only purchased the North Face tent for a backup when Alps tent finally wears out.

the north face two man tent above is what I call a 3 1/2 season tent. any tent that can survive 95+ mph winds can sustain a snow load too. just that a true four season tent has much more durable construction. which also limits use in super hot conditions.

also got a Bibler I-tent which is a true four season tent. would not want to use that tent during 100f+ summer runs. also have a Sierra Designs Stretch Prelude (4 man) which have been used as Mt Everest base tents. have camped in that tent during a Tornado with winds 110+ mph. it survived with no problems. but most of the football field full of tents got flattened. this was during Freewheel a bike ride across Oklahoma.

here's the Alps two man tent setup... note the aluminum poles and how it looks almost identical to the North Face two man tent above. super fast setup .. usually in 3-4 minutes

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Old 11-08-2012, 04:29 PM   #14
JohnBoy777
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""I've camped out in 95+ mph winds in an Alp tent""

Really, are those internet 95+ MPH winds or regular 95+ MPH winds?

Cause internet winds are kinda like dog years, but in reverse.
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Old 11-08-2012, 04:55 PM   #15
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Wow _cy_, it sounds like you're a pretty wild guy to camp with! I think one trip with hurricane speed winds would be enough for me. (nice bike too)
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