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Old 04-20-2014, 08:20 PM   #1
McRed OP
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SYM Citycom 300i-got one?

Considering a Citycom, looking for input from the collective.
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Old 04-20-2014, 09:59 PM   #2
brianwheelies
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My local dealer in Vegas has one

From all accounts it is a great bike.

Low maintenance as the valves stay in spec on the FI model through 30,000 miles(quoted by Ooty's Scooters in Santa Barbara) and they have ceramic coated cylinder and one piece cylinder/head.

The only negatives are parts availability and power is down compared to Kymco 300's and the Piaggio 350. I think the true top speed is mid to high 70's mph. The comparable models listed are closer to 90mph.
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Old 04-21-2014, 05:05 AM   #3
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http://www.justgottascoot.com/citycom2013.htm

Here's a review buy a guy who is pretty unbiased (other than he loves Kymcos). I think Brianwheelies is spot on. My only concern would be if you have access to a decent dealer. They are few and far between.

There's a forum for SYM: http://www.symforum.com/
and a dealer in CA Ooty's scoots is probably the most helpful guy I've heard of with regard to SYM. Check out the forums and you'll get a sense of the strengths and weaknesses of the Citycom.

If you decide to get one please let us know- it's helpful to have owners chime in with real world insight into the many cool ride options out there.
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Old 06-22-2014, 09:36 PM   #4
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Citycom

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Originally Posted by McRed View Post
Considering a Citycom, looking for input from the collective.
I have an 09 that I bought non current at a healthy discount. Mine has 32000 km which is 20,000 miles and it has been very reliable. It's been used for mountain backroad riding, commuting as well as for a week long camping trip. The valves are good; they've never needed adjusting. The OE front tire is still good, I have a Michelin CityGrip on the back which is the second tire, also still good. I did have to replace the battery with a much stronger Yuasa AGM, but the plug is still OE and works fine. There is a little stepper motor that regulates the FI and the idle speed that got stuck. I could still ride the bike but it was running too rich. Engineer brother told me this is common with bikes and FI and that " W/D 40 is your friend " and so it turned out to be. This was my big mechanical failure. Cost: $0. Just some time.

Stick to the stock Mitsu belts for the CVT. Aftermarket belts have a much shorter life. I change my OE belt every 20,000 km and there isn't really much that will usually cause trouble if the bike is left stock. About the only thing I seem to spend money on is brake pads. I got 8000km or 5000 miles out of the OE front. 12000 km or 7000 miles with EBC organics.

The last time I had a new bike this reliable was my 1970 Honda CB350.

As far as performance goes; my Citycom runs well. It took a long time to fully break in and run it's best; about 20,000 km or 12400 miles. It's quick up to 55mph and it will cruise all day easily at 7000 rpm which works out to 68 mph and this is also the HP peak. Once broken in the bike will easily go faster, but I limit mine to 7000 rpm and usually less. Scooters of this class were engineered to be urban commuters not high speed sport bikes. Kept stock and used gently these bikes can last a very, very long time. As an example there are a pair of SYM HD 125's on the SYM owners site that are used for backroad cruising and have well over 60,000 miles on them. The Citycom is a great little cruiser that has replaced my big cruiser for most of my riding.

Phipsd screwed with this post 06-22-2014 at 10:19 PM
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Old 06-22-2014, 11:09 PM   #5
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I test road the Citicom the day I bought my BV350. I probably would have bought the Citicom if I didn't find out how much faster the BV was.

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Old 06-23-2014, 06:10 PM   #6
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Personally; I'm happy with my Citycom's performance. There would be something wrong if the BV350 wasn't faster. It's 330cc and a higher price vs 263. I look at the total package of price, reliability, comfort , weather protection and handling when I consider a scooter. Once a scooter has a sufficient level of performance; speed doesn't enter into it. I don't need to buy a scooter for speed thrills; my main ride is a V-strom 1000 which has double the power of even the most powerful scoots.

The salesman who sold me my Citycom traded his Citycom for a BV350. After the new wore off, he told me he understood why I preferred the Citycom.

I'm a big guy. the Citycom fits me better than any other midsize scoot. I chose SYM reliability over Italian flash and sizzle. That's what floats my boat.
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Old 06-23-2014, 10:38 PM   #7
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Is it easy to inspect/adjust the valves?
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:50 AM   #8
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Sounds like they go a long way in between adjustments:

"Remove seat bucket and floorboard for access to valve cover. Adjust as you would your Kymco. You won't need to do this until 20,000 - 30,000 mi., unlike the the Kymco." That's Ootscoot over on Symforum....he's a highly regarded dealer and resident SYM guru-guy....

I'd actually love to see a Citycom some day....
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Old 06-26-2014, 09:33 PM   #9
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A bike like the Citycom will appeal most to an experienced rider who can appreciate a bike that works well; that has a harmonious feel. It's not a powerful bike, but it's zippy and quickest once the clutch engages, which is helpful keeping ahead of the urban death wish car drivers.

The stock clutch engages quickly, which makes the stop and go painless. A touch of throttle allows me to feather the clutch briefly like I would in my manual car to creep along in slow moving gridlock without the need for constant clutch slipping. I would not want to give up the useful freewheel at low speeds. Even in very slow traffic, I seldom need to put my feet down if I'm moving at all; the bike is so well balanced. It's effortless.

Moving more quickly; the bike tips into corners beautifully with a wonderful fluid feel that is both nimble and stable. It's stable on the highway even in gusty winds. In more serious conditions, I move up on the seat and the bike becomes both more agile and solid whether in knarly twists or more challenging weather. Overall, it's a decent little bike, but the handling, the feel of the bike as it goes about it's business, makes it special.

Back in the day VW ran an ad campaign" Few things in life work as well as a Volkswagen " As a VW Bug owner I 'got it' even though they weren't high tech , powerful or the fastest. I feel the same way about my Citycom.
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Old 06-27-2014, 03:51 AM   #10
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Phipsd-

Nice write up. As noted I have never seen a Citycom nor seen one advertised in Atlanta (I check Craigslist cycle ads multiple times per day).

I'm curious as to whether you've ever checked the top speed with GPS on it?

One of the things that always puzzled me was that Justgottascoot's road test could only get 79mph tops out of it.

http://www.justgottascoot.com/citycom.htm

It's not that this is necessarily bad, just strange that the HD200 will do 72 with a 171cc engine and the Citycom is 263cc. Thoughts?
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Old 06-27-2014, 01:04 PM   #11
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There was a fellow in NZ: Kiwiscoot who put over 40,000 km on his Citycom in a fairly short period of time. He found that his Citycom was a much faster bike at 20,000 km. I had the same experience with mine. Mine was a little pokey when new, by 8000 km it was starting to perk up and by 13000 km it could climb hills much more easily. The performance on mine continued to improve until the 20,000 mark. SYM says 130 kph, and on a bike that is well broken in that sounds about right.

My Navy Chief Engineer father told me many moons ago that an engine that takes a long time to fully break in will likely be a long lasting engine and that being under stressed is a good thing. Clearly that is what SYM has done with the Citycom. It's peak HP is at a low 7000 rpm. This is low, even for a scooter.This should be very good for longterm durability, as well as providing better performance at lower rpm. Compared to the HD 200, I would rather have the larger displacement lower stress motor, even if it isn't much faster.

It's not as if the Citycom is a dog. I recall a British test when the Citycom first came out, and they found that the 263 Citycom was actually a little quicker to 50 kph (31 mph ) than the 500 T-Max. The Citycom is a machine designed for the urban environment, that also by virtue of a roomy upright riding position, good weather protection and steady handling to be an excellent comfortable long distance scooter. I know a GTi 300 is quicker, but it's also much less comfortable and costs more.

I want a reliable, all day comfortable scooter that really handles well and goes fast enough and that is what I got. I have zero interest in trading my comfort and handling for a few more mph.
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Old 06-27-2014, 02:26 PM   #12
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After pacing Binh at 50mph+/- on the highway I think the Citycom's performance is adequate. Sounds similar to the RV250 I had.
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Old 06-27-2014, 03:30 PM   #13
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The Right Tool For The Job

Compared to the RV250, the Citycom will be quicker off the line and will climb hills more easily but not quite as fast on the top end. Compared to the 250's, the FI 263 motor was retuned for better real world performance, a couple less HP on top, but better midrange and fuel economy.

I've been riding my 1000 V-Strom. Yesterday I dug out the Citycom for a run to Vancouver. There must be something wrong with me. I was enjoying the responsive performance of my scoot. I can easily leave traffic behind at the lights, accelerate up the steep Alex Fraser Bridge . Not once during the day ever feeling that my ride was somehow lacking. I really don't understand all this concern about top speed on a midsize commuter scooter. It seems to me to be the wrong question.

It would be like buying a new Hyundai Accent and obsessing over the top speed. Or my favourite example are the hordes of people buying 50's then thrashing them trying to make them go faster. For the money they put into fixing and maintaining a thrashed 50; they could have bought a 125 and rode the same speed trouble free for years.

A Citycom can cruise 60 to 70 mph without undue strain. If a person needs to go faster than that they should be looking at a bike with a larger higher spec engine that can go the speed they want without pushing it. You may use a little more gas, but that is nothing compared to having a bike that can go four times further before major repairs are needed. Just because a bike with a small engine can be pushed to go a certain speed, doesn't mean that it is prudent to do so. I like all these guys who boast on scooter forums about running their Burgman's or Majesty's at 80 mph all day on the Interstate then they are shocked when their engines lunch themselves at 40,000 miles when they expected to get 100,000. Small scooters are not the vehicle for sustained high speed travel. The right tool for the job.

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Old 06-27-2014, 04:33 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phipsd View Post
Compared to the RV250, the Citycom will be quicker off the line and will climb hills more easily but not quite as fast on the top end. Compared to the 250's, the FI 263 motor was retuned for better real world performance, a couple less HP on top, but better midrange and fuel economy.

I've been riding my 1000 V-Strom. Yesterday I dug out the Citycom for a run to Vancouver. There must be something wrong with me. I was enjoying the responsive performance of my scoot. I can easily leave traffic behind at the lights, accelerate up the steep Alex Fraser Bridge . Not once during the day ever feeling that my ride was somehow lacking. I really don't understand all this concern about top speed on a midsize commuter scooter. It seems to me to be the wrong question.

It would be like buying a new Hyundai Accent and obsessing over the top speed. Or my favourite example are the hordes of people buying 50's then thrashing them trying to make them go faster. For the money they put into fixing and maintaining a thrashed 50; they could have bought a 125 and rode the same speed trouble free for years.

A Citycom can cruise 60 to 70 mph without undue strain. If a person needs to go faster than that they should be looking at a bike with a larger higher spec engine that can go the speed they want without pushing it. You may use a little more gas, but that is nothing compared to having a bike that can go four times further before major repairs are needed. Just because a bike with a small engine can be pushed to go a certain speed, doesn't mean that it is prudent to do so. I like all these guys who boast on scooter forums about running their Burgman's or Majesty's at 80 mph all day on the Interstate then they are shocked when their engines lunch themselves at 40,000 miles when they expected to get 100,000. Small scooters are not the vehicle for sustained high speed travel. The right tool for the job.
+1

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Old 06-27-2014, 05:21 PM   #15
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Well I'm certainly not obsessing about the Citycom's speed, just curious as to why 90 additional cc's were only gaining 7 mph over the HD.

It sounds like a great scooter but sadly like the rest of SYM they are not represented in our metro area of 6 million people.
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