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Old 11-13-2012, 02:29 AM   #16
Flood
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I have a japanese water stone, but I never got the hang of it. In the end I always go back to my Lansky set, which is practically foolproof.
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Old 11-13-2012, 05:49 AM   #17
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I have used a Spyderco Sharpmaker for well over 10 years now. It works very well at making a sharp edge sharper. The ceramics are too fine for neglected edges. For those I use a DMT stone then switch over to the sharpmaker.
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Old 11-13-2012, 08:39 AM   #18
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the dmt stones are great for lapping water stones.
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Old 11-13-2012, 10:49 AM   #19
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I use a WorkSharp (it stores easier than a 1x30 belt grinder) and leather hones with polishing compounds.
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Old 11-13-2012, 10:58 AM   #20
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what's the belt length on the worksharp? I'd like it more if I could use more standard belts... maybe an additional idler pulley to take up the 30" slack :P

love love LOVE trizact belts, but they're not available in a whole lot of sizes.
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:50 PM   #21
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Doing it by hand, how in the heck do you maintain the proper angle?
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Old 11-13-2012, 01:01 PM   #22
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straight up is 90 degrees, half of that is 45, half of that is 22.5, half of that's 11.25. I use the halves because its easy to visualize. Just figure out what you're using the knife for, then the strength of the steel, and use those to determine the angle. Personally I have my santoku at 11 degrees, single bevel, most of my pocket knives are around 30-40 degrees inclusive (or, 15-20 degrees on each side).

here's an article for you http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/De...es-W28C60.aspx
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Old 11-13-2012, 05:51 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeraux View Post
Doing it by hand, how in the heck do you maintain the proper angle?
That's the art, finding a way to hold a consistent angle by hand. Jigs make it easier, but to just eyeball it and have it not dip and wave across the length of the blade - that's craftsmanship.

Practice, practice, practice. Watch other people do it. Practice some more.
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Old 11-13-2012, 09:07 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeraux View Post
Doing it by hand, how in the heck do you maintain the proper angle?
I made this extremely simple jig:


It's a block of wood with 11 degree from verticle saw kerfs. I've got a few different chunks of aluminum plate, with sandpaper from 240 to 2000 grit glued on. It's easy to keep the knife vertical. I used to sharpen entirely by feel, and I could get a very sharp edge, but I wasn't as consistent or fast. The first time I sharpen a knife, I'll start with a belt sander to shape the edge- most knives that have been sharpened before have a very fat edge, like 45 degree included angle.

I bought a lansky for my in laws, and I often use it when I visit, so that I can use a sharp knife, but I think it's slow, and I'm not that happy with the coarseness of the stones. I sharpen woodworking tools on an almost daily basis to a razor edge, and sandpaper (and occasionally buffing compound on a piece of maple) is all I use.
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Old 11-13-2012, 09:30 PM   #25
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I use a Spyderco tri-edge if the edge is okay, a cardboard wheel followed by the Spyderco if the Spyderco alone doesn't cut it, and a 400 grit belt followed by the rest if the edge is completely shot.

I can use a whetstone, but they take forever....
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Old 11-14-2012, 06:33 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithy View Post
That's the art, finding a way to hold a consistent angle by hand. Jigs make it easier, but to just eyeball it and have it not dip and wave across the length of the blade - that's craftsmanship.

Practice, practice, practice. Watch other people do it. Practice some more.

That's what I thought.

With my good knives, it's much better left to a professional.

Thanks.
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Old 11-14-2012, 06:59 AM   #27
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^ I am thinking by hand on a variety of stones it is not that hard; however, I remember starting out when I was twelve and how frustrating it was. My Dad said to keep at it and after some time it became natural to accomplish consistent enough angles to produce good edges. After 50 years of by hand I can sharpen a knife on smooth concrete if I have to.

What is good about hand sharpening is that you can just to it anywhere without much setup. I have been over to dinner at houses where there was not a sharp knife in the house. Scrounge around find some bullshit carborundum stone, throw it on top of a wet towel on the counter and sharp away. Five minutes later one can cut a tomato or slice some meat. Not perfect but a hell of a lot better that sawing with a butter knife.
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Old 11-14-2012, 07:08 AM   #28
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True, true. But I'd probably just use the knife I brought with me.
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Old 11-14-2012, 10:19 AM   #29
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Lansky Issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by slackmeyer View Post
I made this extremely simple jig:


It's a block of wood with 11 degree from verticle saw kerfs. I've got a few different chunks of aluminum plate, with sandpaper from 240 to 2000 grit glued on. It's easy to keep the knife vertical. I used to sharpen entirely by feel, and I could get a very sharp edge, but I wasn't as consistent or fast. The first time I sharpen a knife, I'll start with a belt sander to shape the edge- most knives that have been sharpened before have a very fat edge, like 45 degree included angle.

I bought a Lansky for my in laws, and I often use it when I visit, so that I can use a sharp knife, but I think it's slow, and I'm not that happy with the coarseness of the stones. I sharpen woodworking tools on an almost daily basis to a razor edge, and sandpaper (and occasionally buffing compound on a piece of maple) is all I use.

What are you not happy with? Too Coarse, Too Fine?

I agree that they can be slow, in the two or three decades I have been using mine I have upgraded all the stones to diamond and added some of their "ultra" fine (non diamond) stones to finish up the edges. Having the Extra-Coarse diamond stone has really sped up the process for me to straighten out a poorly contoured factory edge, wish they had brought it out in the beginning. There are still some steels that take a long time to shape, even with that stone. My Gerber LHR (S30V?) came out of the box looking like a rookies first day project and that required a couple of hours to get where I wanted it.
My only issue with Lansky (besides getting bored or hand cramps from a really 'needy' edge) has been the plastic 'holders' for the stones, most come unglued eventually and I have managed to break one at the rod attachment but that was probably from being too lazy to take the rod out and bend it with pliers (or a vice) to get it to align with the stone.


Bruce
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Old 11-14-2012, 10:27 AM   #30
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Fixtures and stones are mentioned, but just as important is the direction the edge moves relative to the stone. What do you guys do? My dad taught me to use backhand to get a very thin rolled wire edge with the coarser/medium grits, then break that "wire" off with finer stones and polish with a strop.
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