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Old 11-25-2012, 05:31 PM   #1
jgrady1982 OP
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Location: Cleveland, Ohio
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Delta 28-303 14 inch bandsaw repair

I purchased a Delta 20-303 14" bandsaw about a month ago from HGR.

It worked great in high speed, and I think it was used for cutting mostly wood. The saw had a dusting of wood shavings and a wood blade when I bought it. There is a clutch system that allows you to change from high to low speed and I could not get the saw to engage the low speed setting.

So I removed the lower pulley gear system after I drained about a quart and a half of gear lube. Inside the lower case was a sheared off roll pin that I think is the culprate for the inner slow speed clutch not working.

My question is how do I get the shaft out of the lower wheel drive?

There are two woodruff keys it looks like that I think need to be punched out before I remove the shaft. How do I do this? Heat them up and tap them out? Or is there another way?

Here are the pics. The saw is very nice overall, and judging from this thread http://owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=117620 I think that this clutch engagement issue is kind of common.

Thanks,

Jack





One whole roll pin and one sheared in half, the broken one was sitting in the bottom oil when I removed the lower drive/gear shaft.





Drive wheel side of saw


I made a mobile dolly out of 1/8" x 2" angle plate welded together with some harbor freight casters on the bottom. My garage is so small that everything needs to be on wheels. One coat of oil based machine shop grey applied today.


I also made a surface plate stand out of the same material along with some braces for two shelves to store mill vices as well as lathe chucks. That gets painted once I weld on some caster mounting plates to the bottom.

jgrady1982 screwed with this post 11-25-2012 at 05:37 PM
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Old 11-25-2012, 05:44 PM   #2
sailah
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I used to rebuild really big old American Iron woodworking machines. They are really fun to work on and bring back to life. Nothing modern can touch them. Good to see you found OWWM, that was my first suggestion.

As far as taking out the keys, I usually take a junk screwdriver and grind it down and beat it in between the shaft and key. Sometimes a drift right on the point will knock it loose. I always replace with new too.

Hard to tell from that pic how the shaft comes out, it looks like it is a solid shaft that goes through both sides of the casting and the gear drops down into the oil? If so be very careful smacking the end of that shaft with metal. Based on the fact that you have surface plate in one of your pics, you probably knew that though
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Old 11-26-2012, 09:57 AM   #3
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Woodruff keys are easy. Take a pair of side cutters and grab the sides of the key, then rock them down on the shaft to lever the key out. When you replace the roll pin, use a Spirol pin. It's made of spiral rolled steel and is stronger than an ordinary roll pin.
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Old 11-26-2012, 05:09 PM   #4
jgrady1982 OP
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I checked out the spirol website. Thanks for that tip by the way.

Where do I buy these things at, McMaster Carr?

From the looks of it I am not the first person to have this apart. I found a loosely threaded set screw holding the inner clutch gear off of the large gear for the slow metal speeds. Also there were a bunch of washers on the outside of the clutch keeping the outer clutch engaged to the large fast wood speed pulley.

When I got it all apart I cleaned the drive shaft up in the parts washer and then cleaned the inner clutch. It was full of dry sticky caked on oil and this was making it not move freely on the shaft. So I buffed the shaft (great description...right) and then cleaned up the inner clutch and now it moves freely.

It is a pretty neat, simple design when it gets broked down. All the bearings spin freely and there is no binding going on. I just need some new roll pins and this thing is ready to go.

I pounded out the assembly from the drive wheel (saw blade) side. Then I used my gear puller to pull off the remaining bearing with the slot on the side of it and then had to use the same pulley to remove the inner clutch, that is how caked on it was with old oil. Pretty nasty. Cleaned everything up in the parts washer, and now I am two roll pins away from getting this thing back and running.

Here are the pics:

Thanks for the replies btw, I love this site. People here know a lot about a lot of stuff!

I re-created my method for pounding out the assembly. I used a brass brush to keep the shaft kind of level while I hit a hammer on a piece of oak that was against the shaft.




You can see the small set screw in this pic on the inner clutch. They did not even thread the clutch, just kind of jammed/threaded it in there. It came right out.




This is how the gear comes out


You can see how caked on with dry sticky oil this thing is here


I had to use the puller to remove the inner clutch that is supposed to glide freely on the drive shaft




Good and bad roll pins


Backside of the gear, this bearing feels nice so I am going to leave the retainer screw alone and not remove it.


I also cleaned up the lower drive gear in the parts washer
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Old 11-26-2012, 05:26 PM   #5
ttpete
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McMaster's is probably the logical place to get the small hardware. If you want a more secure set screw setup, stack two short headless setscrews in the hole. The second one locks the first one.
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