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Old 05-19-2015, 06:20 AM   #1
Auto-X Fil OP
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Help selecting a trials bike for backyard fun.

I have zero interest in competitive trials - well, that's not true, but I have more interest in other things, so it's not going to be something I dedicate time to. In fact, I'm considering a trials bike because I am cutting back on the amount of time I spend riding without my kids, and it seems that a trials bike would be a good choice for following my son around on his 4 wheeler.

I currently ride my WRR around with him, and amuse myself (and him) by hopping logs and stone walls and doing wheelies. If I could perform even more of those types of antics, at even lower speeds, riding with him would be that much more fun. A trials bike seems like a logical choice for that sort of silly stunting in the woods and backyard.

Should I care what kind of bike I get? I'm looking used and cheap, and will most likely get something in poor shape and fix it up, because I tend to tear apart everything I buy anyway. So, parts availability and cost is probably a concern. Given that it's just for fun, and improving my skills on normal dirtbikes, should I be concerned about specs or age at all?

Thanks!
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Old 05-19-2015, 07:57 AM   #2
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Sounds like a job for an '86/'87 Honda Reflex (TLR200). Cheap, easy to maintain, Honda parts support and can be made street-legal. The other thought would be a Yamaha TY250 but it may not be as cheap to buy/maintain.
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Old 05-19-2015, 08:02 AM   #3
slicktop
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Sounds like you want an older twin shock.
The main advantage of the newer models are lighter weight.
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Old 05-19-2015, 10:27 AM   #4
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For the kind of riding your talking about I would go with the ones that seem to run forever and are good on the trails.

Low cost: I would go with a mid 2000's Beta Rev, Beta 4T, Scorpa 4T (if you can find one). And if your close in size to me 5' 10" and 180 lbs I would go with a 250.

Spend a little more: Maybe a used Montesa 4RT, or really any of the good condition modern bikes in the 250 range.

My 2 cents for what its worth. Good luck and let us know what you decide to get.
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Old 05-19-2015, 11:43 AM   #5
Gordo83
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I agree with the twin shock idea as well. Plus, you'll have an actual seat to sit on while you're riding with your kids. Quite a bit more comfortable than a modern bike, especially if you have no interest in competing. And if you find, down the road, you might be interested, Vintage is a great way to get started.
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Old 05-19-2015, 01:28 PM   #6
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What should I pay for something like a yellow TY250 in rideable shape?
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Old 05-19-2015, 01:41 PM   #7
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Totally disagree on the vintage bike being what you want, esp. the 200 Reflex idea. My brother in law had one. No power or torque, heavy, crappy suspension and brakes. Makes all those maneuvers you spoke of just that much more difficult or damn near impossible.

Since you want cheap, that excludes the modern 4 strokes. That leaves the modern 2 strokes. Modern = those newer than 2002 or so. My suggestion would be the newest Beta Rev 3 (270) you can find in you price range (I'm assuming your price range goes to at least $2k). They are reliable, well built w/ good components, easy and cheap to work on, silly light and have smooth, progressive power. Very easy to ride/get used to, like a motorized mountain bike.
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Old 05-19-2015, 02:32 PM   #8
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A Rev 3 270 is the only trials bike I've ridden for any amount of time. It was very nice, and part of why I want one now.

Trials bikes don't trade much on CL near me. Should I be checking some Trials forums or something?
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Old 05-19-2015, 04:15 PM   #9
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I'd get in touch w/ shops and clubs like the ones listed below and let them know what you are looking for.

http://www.tryalsshop.com/

http://trialstrainingcenter.com/

http://www.mid-atlantictrials.com/

http://d6trials.com/

http://www.district4trials.com/
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Old 05-20-2015, 07:07 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SRG
Totally disagree on the vintage bike being what you want, esp. the 200 Reflex idea. My brother in law had one. No power or torque, heavy, crappy suspension and brakes. Makes all those maneuvers you spoke of just that much more difficult or damn near impossible.
Yeah, but what are you comparing the Reflex to? If it's any bike made since the turn of the Century, then, yeah, the Reflex is going to be a crappy choice.

Auto-X: I have a '92 Aprilia Climber 280R. I bought it, last Fall, for $800 (locally - northern Illinois). I've put about $400 into it (fork seals, tires, fluids, etc.) and time (TLC). I'd probably sell it for $1100 or so (which I plan to do if I enjoy this season's competitive events as much as I think). If you can find an older bike, that's in good condition, you shouldn't have to pay more than $1000. If you want something newer, the price will increase to at least twice that. I guess it depends on what you can afford.
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Old 05-20-2015, 01:45 PM   #11
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In the end it is influenced by what you can afford.

To me its worth the extra $ for something like the Beta Rev 3 270 and I held out tell I could afford that level or more to get one. But if that $2000 to $3500 range is to much then the older good condition bikes start to be a better option.

If you do go to the Beta Rev 3 level I am sure we can dig up one of the old threads on what to look for when buying one. Let us know...
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Old 05-20-2015, 04:02 PM   #12
tastethesoup
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I've been reading along with interest and could gladly use a point to one of those old threads on the Rev 3.

Not to hijack here but I'm a street rider looking to get some dirt skills
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Old 05-20-2015, 07:49 PM   #13
Gordy
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If noise is a concern, not all trials bikes have mufflers that can be re-packed. I know, it's stupid, but people keep buying them.
It cost us about $250 to buy a new muffler for a Sherco that only needed to be re-packed but couldn't.
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Old 05-20-2015, 10:13 PM   #14
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I have to agree with SRG. Modern is the way to go.

I ride with my kids all of the time on my Gas Gas 280 Eco. You can have so much fun riding at their pace and you don't need a seat for the level of exertion that you will put out keeping up with them.

I'm starting competition this year after owning another trials bike for almost a decade. I would have started competing a long time ago if I lived in a state where there was a competitive trials environment.

Maybe I'm just getting old, but trials seems to get more entertaining for me with every passing year.
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Old 05-23-2015, 04:30 PM   #15
MATTY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Auto-X Fil View Post
I have zero interest in competitive trials - well, that's not true, but I have more interest in other things, so it's not going to be something I dedicate time to. In fact, I'm considering a trials bike because I am cutting back on the amount of time I spend riding without my kids, and it seems that a trials bike would be a good choice for following my son around on his 4 wheeler.

I currently ride my WRR around with him, and amuse myself (and him) by hopping logs and stone walls and doing wheelies. If I could perform even more of those types of antics, at even lower speeds, riding with him would be that much more fun. A trials bike seems like a logical choice for that sort of silly stunting in the woods and backyard.

Should I care what kind of bike I get? I'm looking used and cheap, and will most likely get something in poor shape and fix it up, because I tend to tear apart everything I buy anyway. So, parts availability and cost is probably a concern. Given that it's just for fun, and improving my skills on normal dirtbikes, should I be concerned about specs or age at all?

Thanks!
The riding in the woods aspect of this, implies to me there may be a little distance involved.

The modern beta rev 3 or sherco trials montessa 315 r type machines are totally impractical for this type of riding it it is to be anymore than a chore within an hour of operation, sure you could do this i suppose, but why would you want or need to.

The older twin shock style trials bikes are far more comfortable to use for woods riding like you mention. i would go with a small capacity lighter weight more classic style twin shock trials bike like say a cota 125 or perhaps a ty175 or even a ty80 these could double up duties as your kids bike too when necessary, not tying up a bike for just one task.

We used a ty 80 for just such a task, no trials family should be without a ty80 .
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