ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Trip Planning
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-15-2014, 01:38 AM   #1
evermore OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
evermore's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Oddometer: 349
Thinking about long term ride....

I completed a ride from California to Argentina on a DR650SE 3 years ago and still think about it every day. I am now considering doing something a bit more long term, as in no set time limit (couple decades?).

Here is my situation:
- US and Swiss passport so both US or Europe are valid starting points.
- no house or vehicle or other things that tie my down.
- sufficient resources to travel for at least a decade.
- good health

So, here's a few things I'm chewing on:

- I don't have any gear (no bike, nothing) right now so I can start from scratch. I can even decide whether to start to kit out in the US or in Europe. I am leaning towards the US where everything is quite a lot cheaper..

- What bike to pick: I did my ride on a DR650SE and knowing the bike has certain advantages but I hate carburation (the carb being the reason for my only 2 breakdowns during that trip). I have since owned a KTM 690SM and a KTM 990 Adventure Dakar Edition though I definitely prefer the bigger bike. I am very intrigued by the KTM 1190 now but picking a brand new model for such an endeavor is likely the wrong choice. Any thoughts or completely other suggestions?

- Ways to extend my funds: What are viable ways generate some income? Unlike last time, I can stay in areas for long periods as there is no real deadline but frugality alone might get me to a couple decades but I would need to make some money to do this indefinitely. What are some ways people have done this?

- As for initial route, if I start in the US, it would be mostly central Mexico, Venezuela, Brazil before going up back up the West coast of SA/NA and then likely taking a ship to Asia.
evermore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2014, 05:26 AM   #2
Mastery
Mr. Funny Man
 
Mastery's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Hoosier Daddy?
Oddometer: 837
I have five words for you: I am available for adoption.

Good luck with your planning. Sounds like you have more experience with international, long distance traveling, than many people on here and would know what bikes would be the best choice already from the experiences you have encountered.

For the stretching your funds question...what are your skills? Can you offer handyman services? Know engine repair? Good at working on boats? Know multiple languages, so you can teach people English? There's a real big market in Asia for learning English....start an English only immersion class or school.

Take a piece of paper, and write down all the things you are good at...that somebody would pay for or want to learn. I think you'll be surprised at what you could offer to others.
__________________
Nothing witty to say today. Better luck tomorrow!
Mastery is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2014, 08:42 AM   #3
Pecha72
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Oddometer: 3,111
Did Europe > Oz years back. Great trip! Also used to spend many of my winters drinking be... I mean, riding! in South/Southeast Asia. Easy, cheap, warm, friendly, exotic..highly recommended from a RTW biker's point of view!

for one-up riding, I'd take maximum 650cc bike, esp. the twins have enough even for highways, not much to gain from bigger cc's.
__________________
Countries ridden FIN SWE NOR DK EE LV LT POL SK HU RO BG GR IT AT DE CZ CH SMR LIE NL BE FR AND ES GBR LUX SI HR BIH SRB MK TR IR PAK IND TH KH LA MY ID AUS CR USA ZA LS SWZ MZ NA BW ZM ZW
Pecha72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2014, 01:09 PM   #4
bush pilot
Beastly Adventurer
 
bush pilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Location: Thailand
Oddometer: 2,399
I would stick with the 650, simple and reliable cheap to replace, doesn't attract too much attention. I like the KLR650 because they are fairly cheap and easy to acquire good used ones. Or go smaller. Bicycles have an appeal because they are easier to transport and countries like Burma China Vietnam are tough about motorcycle import. Air freight is a chunk of my budget. Also consider keeping a bike in each continent. I got three now one for Asia one in South America and will be taking one to Europe this summer an leaving it there. When I explore OZ, NZ and South Africa I figure on picking up used bikes locally. Temp import into those countries has gotten silly.

Sent from my SM-N900 using Tapatalk
__________________
USA travels 09'
Anchorage to Ushuaia
Iron Butt #35784
bush pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2014, 12:50 AM   #5
evermore OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
evermore's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Oddometer: 349
Thanks for the responses

Bike wise, the difference between getting a DR650 and a larger bike is probably a year's worth of riding money. And as much as I hate the carb, I frankly know the damn thing pretty well by now (nightmares anyone?) so that's almost an advantage. I just a recall a stretch in Peru where I would go from sea level to 14k+ ft and back down 5 times in 4 weeks. Nothing exposes the limits of carburation as elevation changes.

Anyhow, riding for twenty years would use up all my savings including my 401(k) so I would approach retirement age (36 now) without a penny on me but who can predict what the world will look like 20 years from now? Will retirement as we know it today even be an option (or a desirable option) at that time? Or as the saying goes, predictions are difficult, especially about the future.

Generating income to stretch the cash would offset that and it comes in two main forms:

1. ride related and independent of location. That seems to be the path of having a nice website and sponsorships. Whether this pays enough to meet costs (say about $1200 a month) seems doubtful and should not be the main strategy, is my guess.

2. find local work: teach, wrench, bartend? I have an engineering/project management background, obviously speak English so these are options. Of course this requires staying put for certain periods which may actually interfere with strategy 1.

A mix of the two would seem the best option overall though. I have a feeling the journey itself will ultimately suggest additional ways of making money.
evermore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2014, 04:47 PM   #6
B.C.Biker
mighty fine
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: southern interior B.C.
Oddometer: 614
I've things that tie me down a bit right now ( mostly all good and worthwhile things) but am doing this on a smaller scale. In north America for now.
I'm working on turning 50 in a couple years. At about your age it was time for me to shit or get off the pot. I was more than ready to wander off but some family stuff came up. Talked it over in my mind and went for a compromise.
For me it was simple but not always easy. Now when I do work it's all I do and make way more $ than doing 8 hour days and sleeping at night. I leave for work and a month or three later I come home and do nothing workwise for a month or several. We find it's actually not bad for a family. I can give much more of my time this way and have the funds to do it. Also can travel more often and more epic. Been keeping a bike in the southern U.S. the last while. Even with storage and flights it still makes for cheap winter get aways.
If you're a single dude with no stuff and money in the bank it will be way easier for you. Work in North America where wages are big and then wander off for ten months or a year. Working a job for only a couple three months can be fun and not really needing a job swings the power over to you, not the boss or company. Lots of companies and industries are seasonal and need/ employees that can fit in their schedules. Being a traveler makes you interesting and you pick up points of view and skills the regular ho hum gen pop never gets exposed to. Plus being able to tell people you are "semi retired" makes you seem less "odd" to new people and perspective mates you'll meet along the way. Ten years from now when a 1/3 or 1/2 of your money is gone you'll wish you had worked a little bit. Being broke and homeless and 60 with a real story to tell is cool. Being 60 with bucks in the bank and a real story to tell is cooler yet. If you end up 60 but in poor health with no employment history you might have cool stories to tell under the bridge but the others guys that live under the bridge can make up any story they want.
__________________
worship no one.
B.C.Biker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2014, 11:29 PM   #7
evermore OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
evermore's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Oddometer: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by B.C.Biker View Post
...If you end up 60 but in poor health with no employment history you might have cool stories to tell under the bridge but the others guys that live under the bridge can make up any story they want.
Yeah, I've thought about that worst case scenario but the Swiss passport comes in handy in that case. It won't be sipping champagne time but being homeless is luckily not something I'd have to fear. Anyhow, twenty years of traveling, writing, and photography should leave me with something of value to sell I would think. My prior work was in semiconductors so I have little exposure to seasonal work nor any contacts where short term project management experience would be sought. Things will develop though. My last consulting job had me spend 5 months in India so it's not that I lack in flexibility.
evermore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2014, 08:48 PM   #8
B.C.Biker
mighty fine
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: southern interior B.C.
Oddometer: 614
For sure. I'm Canadian, impossible to go hungry here unless it's self inflicted. I just mean once you are ahead financially it's easier to stay ahead by adding to the pot a bit as you go as compared to being broke and trying for a big score.
This subject is timely for me as it's something my middle aged friends and I have be discussing it a lot lately. Would have-should haves and the like. I always vote for an interesting life. I don't have the trophy house and cars like some of my friends from the old days but I've stories to tell and few regrets.
But I must say I'm envious of your position!
__________________
worship no one.
B.C.Biker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2014, 01:32 PM   #9
BaronVonDarrin
Studly Adventurer
 
BaronVonDarrin's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Philadelphia, and at times Western Maryland
Oddometer: 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by evermore View Post
Anyhow, riding for twenty years would use up all my savings including my 401(k)
haha. must be nice to have such things. id trade my non existent 401k for a fucking WEEK of riding i never get to do.
__________________
"Dammit Bobby"
Husqvarna 2011 te630
BaronVonDarrin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2014, 12:13 PM   #10
Stu
Buffo Maximus
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: Eastern YahooLand
Oddometer: 885
Bombing Around for a Decade

Quote:
Originally Posted by BaronVonDarrin View Post
haha. must be nice to have such things. id trade my non existent 401k for a fucking WEEK of riding i never get to do.
Your Husky will do just fine. Call your boss and tell him riding weather is here and you will call when you return. Work on the way. That is what I did when I was younger.

Now I'm older, have responsibilities and a KTM 500 EXC. So that is what I will take for my long trips.

Evermore: I have two rules on bikes for very long trips where you are by yourself for lengthy distances: 1) you have to be able to pick it up if you drop it (which means it also has to be durable enough to survive drops) and 2) you have to be able to troubleshoot and fix it. My KTM 500 fits that. The KTM 690 single fits that as well. I did purchase a spare injector nozzle and the two mounting screws "just in case" I get gas pumped from the bottom of someone's tank and it is full of sludge and sand. The KTMs are also electronically fairly simple without complicated ECUs (i.e., they don't rat on you to the taxing authorities, dealers or the police about your driving mileage, habits and speeds). And they are a hell of a lot of fun. Light, quick and great handling in rougher conditions. The 1190 Adventure is a proven bike and the new one is an upgrade so I would not worry about it. I found my 950 to be tough to pick up alone and not as much fun in rough stuff. Vibration on the street at 60~65 was the same as I have with the 500. So I sold it.

Making money. With your background I would try consulting. You can do that with a notebook from anywhere, especially with an internet connection from T-Mobile plugged into the notebook. T-Mobile is world wide. Writing and photography are extremely competitive and do not pay a lot. It is also difficult to carry pro shooting gear on a bike. Large sensors require large optics and downsizing the optics (full frame lenses, for example) just isn't currently possible.

Stu
Stu is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 02:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014